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caliber 33 sailboat data

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caliber 33 sailboat data

When the McCreary brothers (Michael, a naval architect, and George, a business major) got out of college, they built a boat in their garage. The next year, 1980, they formed a company and introduced a snappy 28-foot performance cruiser. In 1985, in the midst of boatbuilding’s grimmest times, they opened a plant and launched the Caliber 33.

Now Caliber offers a four-boat line, and its newest boat is a 47-foot “Long Range Cruiser.” The company’s business philosophy begins, “though no longer a backyard operation, we still believe that smaller is better.” While we have to wonder how their progression from 28 to 47 feet bears that out, Caliber’s position, practices and products all reflect the brothers’ brand of “small is beautiful.” Neither volume nor custom builders, they have staked out a somewhat unique piece of the waterfront.

The 33 was discontinued prior to 1990 and fewer than 70 were sold. Still, it was large in building Caliber’s reputation and identity. She is a peculiar blend of tradition and innovation, of security and performance, of practicality and pizzazz. All of the owners we heard from were “satisfied.” One called the 33 his favorite boat over six decades of sailing. The brothers received very good ratings, too, for listening to owners, dealing with problems and refining the boats.

The Design Halsey Herreshoff once let slip the family’s secret, that Nathanael Herreshoff drew the masterstroke stem of the classic New York 40 “using a straightedge.” It looks like many of the Caliber’s lines were drawn the same way. The sheerline, house crown, house edge and cockpit coamings are, in designer McCreary’s profile drawing and sail plan, dead straight. The real boat, however, is not as angular as the blueprint. Trim, accents, curved toe-rails, stripes and refraction all bend and soften those knife-edges; the boat has a “sharp” look and (because most sailboats depend on fair curves for their appeal) the 33 is distinctive. Its bowsprit confuses the line of the stem, the stern is a bit too upright to be sexy, house and coaming are a touch blocky, but she gets second looks.

What sets the Caliber 33 apart from the smallcruiser crowd, though, is its stability. Depending on which brochure you believe, the displacement is variously reported as 11,400 pounds and 13,000 pounds. Same with ballast: 5,500 or 6,100 pounds of internal lead. For a well-above-average ballast/displacement ratio of about 48 per cent, it should be stiff. Low deadrise angles in the way of the keel, firm bilges and sections aft that are relatively flat add form stability.

Several years ago, we told George McCreary we’d like to test sail one of his boats. He declined. In the April 1996 issue, we asked for Caliber 33 owners to volunteer taking a PS editor sailing. Many responded, for which we are grateful. We ended up going out with Allan Barry, owner of a 1987 model in Marion, Massachusetts.

Caliber 33

Under single-reefed main and genoa rolled-in one third, we were hard-pressed to heel her 20 degrees on the wind in 20 knots of true breeze. Our test model had the standard draft of 4′ 6″; a shoal draft model with 4′ 0″ draft and 500 pounds more ballast was offered.

Michael McCreary arranged the other elements of the design—a somewhat tall rig, smoothly modeled waterlines and a fairly long sailing length to minimize wetted surface—to make the 33 a rewarding boat to sail. Still, his first priorities seem to have been “big boat” feel and motion, a large interior and notable stability. That he managed this and still kept the displacement/length ratio at 198 (or 226, again depending on displacement) helps explain why so many cruising owners report satisfaction with her all-round performance. However, its medium-sized sailplan coupled with the parasitic drag of a big skeg/ rudder assembly and big keel, plus its overall heft, make light air a weak point.

Caliber 33

Construction The 33 was among the quietest boats we’ve sailed. In 5′ Buzzard’s Bay slop, the creaks and groans that can come with torquing and pounding in a seaway were absent. Caliber glasses the bulkheads and furniture to the solid-glass hull (as opposed to employing an interior “pan”). That is no automatic assurance of soundness; the precision of fit and bedding plus the care and materials that go into the glassing are all variable, but our 10-year-old test boat seemed well made. Caliber calls for double taping at all points and quadruple taping of structural bulkheads.

The fiberglass deck is cored with 3″ squares of plywood. Where most builders today use balsa, sometimes employing plywood for areas where compression is a concern (such as under hardware), the Caliber 33 has plywood throughout. It’s heavier than balsa and if it gets wet (hardware bedding wears out), localized delamination would be a likely consequence.

The McCrearys have trademarked their hull-deck joint. The “Quad-Seal” joint gets its name from the four separate seals against water penetration incorporated in the process. Most interesting, we felt, was the “gasket” formed by a ring of copolymer tape around the inboard end of the joint between hull and deck flanges. George McCreary explained that the tape forms a seal when hull and deck are joined. The remainder of the space between the hull and deck parts is sealed with 3M 5200. The joint is capped with an aluminum toe-rail (through-bolted on 6″ centers), and faced with a rubrail (stainless steel with cushioned rubber backing.) The tape gasket forces the sealant outboard, into the joint, rather than letting it escape into the boat. Caliber uses carriage bolts that fit square holes in the toerail so that tightening the bolts won’t cause them to turn and disrupt the seal. There are simpler, quicker ways, but George McCreary said, “We almost never get leaks, and when we do it’s usually from deck hardware.” Only one Caliber owner wrote about a leak, and it was traced to a stanchion base.

Caliber uses large, closely-spaced floor timbers; over-sized standing rigging and spar section; chainplates bonded with extra fiberglass; extra glass in the way of the engine beds and shaft log; stainless propeller and rudder shafts; steel rudder backbone, and cast bronze rudder shaft stuffing box.

Our owner was surprised and distrubed when, shortly after he took delivery, his anchor platform/ bowsprit, splintered in a heavy head sea. “We realized that it was too light,” said McCreary, “so we made the platform heavier, cut relieving slits in it, and went from schedule 80 to schedule 160 pipe for the support structure. We also used to weld the base in place. We changed it to a bolt-on nose piece, which made it much easier to repair.”

Interior When the 33 appeared, making a “stateroom” by enclosing an over-sized quarter berth (to starboard) with a bi-fold partition was something of an innovation. Owners say that it has worked well, “a bit cozfor two,” a fine sea berth, and an appreciated “catch all” underway. One owner put a hand rail next to the folded doors because people grabbed the doors so often negotiating the companionway.

The companionway is broad, wider at the top than the bottom, and has four wide, gradually-spaced steps. Without a full bridge deck, getting up and down and fitting through are very easy. A rail to port (to prevent lurching into the galley) would make it even more secure. To blue-water purists, the opening might seem overly large. McCreary says the companionway boards lock in place, which is advised in heavy weather.

The galley is well-sited and efficient; stowage received high marks from owners. The owners of our test boat also customized utensil stowage with cutouts for their own pots and pans. It’s good to see a back-up foot pump for freshwater (70-gallon tank capacity) and seawater. Counter space extends beneath the wrap-around cabinets. Near the companionway and served by a small overhead hatch and porthole, the galley is well ventilated.

The fold-up table opens up the saloon (6′ 3″ headroom), though one owner reported having to beef up its bulkhead hardware.

Wood and white overheads, teak panels and trim, a teak & holly sole…the 33’s interior is traditional. It avoids “teakiness” with woods chosen from the bright side and ample natural light but is more conservative than memorable.

All non-cosmetic fiberglass used to be painted brown, but the owners of our test boat convinced the McCrearys to lighten up with white.

The navigation station could be bigger. Perhaps as a trade-off, the head is quite large. You can enter from either the saloon or forward cabin without disturbing the other space. The V-berth is 7′ long, but the taper forward (for foot room) restricts the useable length.

Performance Depending on the ballast figure used, the sail area/ displacement ratio of 15.2 (with 13,000 lbs. displacement) or 16.3 (11,400 lbs.) is quite an accurate window on her performance—better than some, but not as good as many. Many dedicated cruisers in this size range have hit the market over the past 10 years. Many incorporate advances in foil design, rig geometry, weight-sensitive construction, even hull shape. These modern boats might not deliver everything they promise, but the Caliber 33 enjoys none of them; as a result, its performance is “traditional.”

Handling is another story. Time and again, owners call the 33 “agile,” “nimble” and “lively.” Its generous, skeg-hung rudder gives superior control.The considerable beam helps the boat stand on its feet and, while large, its girth is well-modulated so that she has a regular hull shape with consequent good manners under sail. When you start heeling, control remains good and helm builds only gradually. Weather helm occasionally becomes an issue over 18 knots, but shortening sail is an acceptable cure. Whiplash is not a problem, but neither is boredom.

Negotiating a narrow, winding channel and picking up a mooring under sail, our test boat did all that we asked. Beating to a weather mark in big seas and moderate air, she was much more efficient cracked off slightly than when we tried to point up to around 35° with the apparent wind.

The deck layout is conventional. Inboard shrouds allow tight sheeting angles and make it easy to go forward. Our owner replaced the standard winches with bigger ones and was happy that he did.

Reefing and traveler controls do their job. Several owners praised the quality, size, and placement of standard hardware: “Just what I would have bought myself.” Our owner felt the need to install a winch dedicated to the roller furling controls. “We don’t put on roller furling ourselves, so we leave that to the owners,” McCreary said.

The 3-cylinder (28-hp.) Yanmar 3GM 30F diesel provides good reserve power. Our boat cruised at better than 6 knots at 2800 rpm in flat water. Exhaust grime staining the transom was a problem for several owners. Engine access is from both companionway and sail locker and was rated excellent by a number of owners. Fuel capacity is 26 gallons. The prop is a 15″ x 11″ three-blade, which will give good powering performance, but substantial drag under sail. As one owner noted, switching to a feathering prop can add up to an extra knot of boat speed. Two owners reported that the prop shaft came loose from the engine coupling.

Caliber 33

Conclusion This is a pleasant boat to sail, but there are going to be other boats, sometimes even smaller boats, that inch by you in the course of port-to-port or relaxed daysailing. Catch your competition when the wind is on the beam and over 15, however, and you can puff out your chest. The 33 is large enough and workable enough below that some couples might choose to live aboard, but they would have to be a dedicated pair.

It is built well. In fact, compared to most production sailboats today, it is overbuilt. Someone had to pay for the materials that went into her. As a used boat that should make her something of a bargain.

Her motion is more gradual and kindly than lighter boats. Her draft (4’6″) is convenient, but she’s not great on the wind. There are hatches where there should be hatches; several are on the small side. Perhaps with 11 opening house ports there’s no need to cut bigger holes in the deck.

We liked this boat and the care with which the McCreary brothers put her together.

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caliber 33 sailboat data

First impressions The Caliber 33 looks better in the water than it does on paper. Although I like the hull shape design-heck, it's the kind of shape I've been scribbling on cocktail napkins for years-most lines appear razor straight in the drawings. The sheerline looks like it was drawn with a ruler, as does the run of the coachroof and cockpit coamings. In the water, the softer side of the 33 becomes apparent. The slope of the forward end of the coachroof flows naturally out of the deck, the radius of the coamings becomes obvious, and the straight rake of the stem is muted a bit by the bowsprit. It's been noted that the appearance of the 33 is a curious blend between traditional and modern and I concur but it's a look I like. Below the waterline the 33 has fairly flat forefoot that abruptly turns south at the leading edge of the large fin keel section. The standard draft is 4 feet, 6 inches and a 4-foot shoal-draft keel was also offered. The west coast of Florida pretty well demands a draft of less than 5 feet and many builders in the area have been influenced by local conditions. The rudder is supported by a full skeg and mounted well aft. Although various sources list slightly different figures, by any terms the 33 is a stiff, stable hull. As a delivery skipper I have long been skeptical of published specifications for secondhand boats that invariably tip the scales well above their designed fighting weights. Immersion factors and different sail configurations further skew the numbers so I generally don't put much stock in ratios. Still, one figure that jumps off the 33's spec sheet is an impressive ballast/displacement ratio of 47 percent. A masthead sloop rig, the 33 carries 525 square feet of working sail. One of the best features added to later 35 models was the addition of an easily removed cutter stay.

Construction Caliber builds its boats the old fashioned way and that's a compliment. Although they are not quite a custom builder, they're anything but a mass production builder. Caliber eschews molded liners and pans, instead it painstakingly laminates specific components into its hand-laid solid fiberglass hulls. The 33 has beefy, closely spaced floors glassed directly to the hull, providing support and rigidity. The teak-and-plywood furniture fittings and bulkheads are also glassed in place with structural bulkheads receiving added attention. The 33's hull-and-deck joint is one of the best I've seen. Set on an inward flange, the joint is made with 3M 5200 and through bolted on six-inch centers. A gasket is then formed around the inboard edge of the joint where any leaks might occur. The toerail and stainless steel rubrail are also incorporated into the joint. Square headed carriage bolts, instead of pan head bolts, fit securely into the rail and won't easily loosen or twist when being tightened. The deck is cored with small plywood sections that are extremely strong but heavy and can delaminate when wet. However, deck problems don't seem to be an issue, probably because Caliber goes to great lengths to keep its boats dry. Still, it is a good idea to carefully inspect and occasionally re-bed deck hardware. The lead ballast in encapsulated in the keel cavity. Quality material and hardware are used throughout the boat, a key reason why older 33s have aged very well.

What to look for Documented problems with Caliber 33s are actually few and far between. The original bowsprit, which is actually just an anchoring platform, was not husky enough and in some cases came apart. Caliber recognized the problem and beefed up the platform and switched to heavier tubing as well. One of the owners I corresponded with mentioned that the standard prop is too small and another noted the shaft had come loose from the coupler. Still, it's fairly impressive how few common complaints I heard. Like all boats, be on the lookout for age-related issues. All 33s are at least 13 years old, and some are nearly 20 years old. Check the standing rigging, especially the original swage fittings. Many Calibers appear to be one-owner boats, which is a nice testament but longtime owners are often blind to problems. Also, Calibers were not spared during the blister woes of the early to mid-1980s-try to find out when and if an epoxy bottom job was last done.

On deck The cockpit of the 33 is a little bit cramped; this is where you remember this is just a 33-foot boat, after all. There also isn't much of a bridgedeck but I confess this worried me more 20 years ago than it does today. The cockpit seats are narrow, although they're also nicely scooped to allow access to the helm seat. Wheel steering was standard and most pedestals are equipped with a teak table. All sail controls are led aft, usually to control stations on the coachroof that are complete with stoppers and a winch. The primary sheet winches can be easily reached from the helm. The traveler is out of the way, mounted forward of the companionway with midboom sheeting arrangement. I recognize this is a compromise that loads up the boom, yet in a boat of this size it makes sense from a space perspective. There is good storage in the port lazarette and under the helm seat. The sturdy aluminum mast is deck stepped, another indication of the big boat mentality of the Caliber 33, and the standing rigging is oversized. Chainplates are set inboard enough for good sheeting angles. Caliber specs called for quality deck gear, from winches to hatches. The nonskid is fairly aggressive and teak handrails on the coachroof are well placed. A large chain locker can hold a couple of anchors and rodes, and the boat I inspected in Miami had rigged a nice wash-down system. I am not usually a fan of bowsprits but I'm okay with the arrangement on the 33. Although the updated version is well supported, it's primarily an anchoring platform and the rig is structurally supported at stem, not via the sprit and bobstay. And, it is nice to stow and deploy the anchors from the platform.

Down below The interior of the Caliber 33 is very nicely finished in teak and innovatively laid out. The companionway steps are wide and there is good headroom throughout, an advantage of a less than sleek coachroof. The white headliner brightens the cabin and nicely offsets the otherwise all- teak interior. The galley is immediately to port as you drop below. Unlike a lot of boats under 35 feet, Caliber built in drawers and lockers instead of resorting to bins. Double stainless sinks with both pressure water and a backup foot pump were standard. The stove and oven are outboard and the icebox is aft. Counter space is more than adequate. The aft quarter cabin arrangement is quite clever. A bi-fold door allows the cabin to be closed for privacy without the encumbrance of a full door. The nav station is tucked away in this cabin, an arrangement that I have on my 47-foot cutter, and it works well, although the chart desk is a bit small. The bunk is a bit snug for two, but it does make an ideal sea berth. The saloon is spacious. A fold-up, bulkhead mounted table is a great idea on any boat under 40 feet. The port settee is straight while the starboard is L-shaped. There's storage behind and under the seat backs and there are full-length shelves above. The teak-and-holly sole adds a bit of elegance. The head, which is to starboard, is quite large for a 33-footer and includes an integral shower. It can be entered from both the saloon and the forward cabin. The V-berth is long, more than 7 feet and has nicely fitted drawers below. There is a decent-sized hanging locker to port. Ventilation throughout the boat is terrific with stainless steel opening ports. Tropical sailors know that portlights are more useful for airflow than overhead hatches. The Caliber 33 interior is certainly large and comfortable enough for a couple to contemplate long-term cruising.

Engine The standard original power plant in the 33 was the reliable Yanmar 3GM30F, a three-cylinder 27-horsepower diesel. As noted earlier, the original prop was a bit undersized and some owners have switched to feathering models, an expensive but worthwhile upgrade. The horsepower is only just adequate for the 33, which is no lightweight, but what you lose in speed you make up for in fuel economy. The 26-gallon fuel tank will likely translate into nearly 50 hours of motoring. One of the key upgrades in the new LRC Calibers is increased tank size. Access to the engine is good from behind the companionway, although reaching the stuffing box still requires a bit of flexibility through the cockpit sail locker.

Under way Several years ago I delivered a 1992 Caliber 35 from Key West to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, and later that same year I took a Caliber 38 from Punta Gorda, Florida, up to Charleston, South Carolina. Although I haven't specifically sailed the 33, I have a good feeling about how Calibers handle. Also, I corresponded with several owners, who incidentally were almost universally pleased with their boats. On my deliveries, we had a range of conditions, from flat calms to a nasty Gulf Stream squall, and the boats coped with the conditions without missing a beat. In fact, we reeled off a 200-mile day on the way to Charleston with an assist from the current. Sailing the 35 we had fresh winds the entire way and completed the 170-mile passage in 30 hours. Owners report that although the 33 is stiff, it develops a fair bit of weather helm when winds approach 20 knots. That's fair enough, and a single reef in the main solves the problem. The boat is not overly close winded and the shoal draft model in particular makes a bit of leeway when sailing hard on the wind. I don't dispute the merits of shoal draft but I still don't like it. The flat forefoot can occasionally pound in a chop but overall the boat has soft motion, which is among the most important features for any cruising boat. The 33 is, however, a bit sluggish in light air.

Conclusion The Caliber 33 is something of a sleeper on the used boat market. It's a high-quality boat, quite comfortable, and when given a bit of wind, it's a decent performer. It will also stand up to a blow and hold up to the rigors of the cruising life. It's an ideal small boat for a Caribbean sabbatical; it was made for the trade winds. With prices ranging from $45,000 to $70,000 it is also a good value.

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caliber 33 sailboat data

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Bluewater Sailboat – Caliber 33

Also known as: caliber 35, caliber 35 lrc.

The Bluewater Sailboat Caliber 33 is a well-liked classic with a large interior in a compact package. The boat, which Michael McCreary, a co-founder of the firm, designed, was introduced in 1985 with a clear focus on the performance-conscious cruiser. The design has undergone numerous advancements over the years, and the current model, the Caliber 35 LRC, is a world-class yacht that is regarded as an exceptional deal on the used market. These boats maintain their value well and typically sell quickly.

Calibers, which have a conventional draught of barely four and a half feet, were created for the East Coast’s shallow seas. If that wasn’t enough, a shoal draught variant drawing four feet was an additional option.

  • LOA: 32′ 6″
  • LWL: 29′ 6″
  • Beam: 11′ 4″
  • Draft, Standard: 4′ 6″
  • Draft, Shoal: 4′ 0″
  • Ballast: 6,100 lbs.
  • Displacement: 11,400 lbs.
  • Sail area: 525 sq.ft.
  • Bridge Clearance: 50′ 1″
  • Headroom: 6′ 3″
  • Fuel: 30 US Gal.
  • Water: 68 US Gal.
  • Engine: Yanmar 27hp diesel
  • Year Introduced: 1985
  • Total Built: 70 (over 100 including Caliber 35 / 35LRC)
  • Designer: Michael McCreary
  • Builder: Caliber Yachts, United States
  • Also Known As: Caliber 35, Caliber 35 LRC

Michael and George McCreary, two brothers who had just graduated from college, started Caliber Yachts in 1980. George concentrated on business and marketing, and Michael got to work on designing the full lineup of Caliber boats as the two worked on a tight budget.

Their first vessel was the Caliber 28, a sturdy coastal cruiser that was packed with qualities that would later come to characterize their sailboats. It was highly accepted, which enabled them to follow up in 1985 with the Caliber 33.

The Caliber 33 was a hit despite being released during leaner economic times, which many people credited to their quality. Before the design was changed into the Caliber 35 in 1990, Caliber’s modest plant in Clearwater, Florida produced a total of 70 boats. The more recent evolution, in addition to numerous other improvements, lengthened the overall length by adding a reverse transom.

The most recent model, the Caliber 35 LRC, was released in 1995 and includes the “long-range cruiser” suffix. The name change most likely occurred for marketing purposes because the Caliber 40 and Caliber 30 LRC, the Caliber 40’s younger sister, were both being released at the same time.

Including the seventy Caliber 33 hulls produced prior to 1990, the total production run of all variants produced by Caliber Yachts (Caliber 33, 35 and 35 LRC) stands at over 100 boats.

The Caliber 33 subtly combines a touch of antiquity with a dash of modernity with to its geometric features and practically flat face. The rudder is skeg hung and set well aft, and the underbelly is relatively modern with flat front sections leading into a fin keel with a straight leading edge. The 33-footer’s hull is solid and stiff, carrying the majority of its beam well aft like modern boats. As a result, there is plenty of space below decks for a couple to live onboard comfortably plus storage space.

Performance

This Bluewater Sailboat has a good grade of build quality, despite the fact that her design isn’t particularly innovative. Without the use of a pre-fabricated liner typically found in contemporary production yachts in this price range, the hull is made entirely of solid fiberglass. Instead, two to four layers of hand-laid fiberglass cloth and glue are used to fix each bulkhead, creating a boat with good access to all parts of the superstructure. The entire bilge is covered with thick, closely spaced floorboards.

The deck-to-hull joint is sealed with polyurethane glue and through bolted to an aluminum toe rail on fiberglass decks with a plywood core. Overall, the result is a sturdy frame free of the stresses-related creaks and groans that are sometimes heard in less-than-stellar boats. Some of the early models had issues with bowsprits failing under heavy loads, which Caliber later fixed with a stronger frame.

Looking for a used sailboat for sale? Check out the Bluewater sailboat data and specs to make an informed decision. Ocean Wave Sail has data for over 10000+ boats that can help you select one to meet your sailing needs.

Now you can also precisely calculate the expenses related to boat ownership to make smart choices based on your budget and sailing needs. Use this bluewater Sailboat Calculator to explore different options and make the best decision.

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caliber 33 sailboat data

The Cal 33 is a 32.67ft masthead sloop designed by C. William Lapworth and built in fiberglass by Jensen Marine/Cal Boats between 1971 and 1973.

191 units have been built..

The Cal 33 is a moderate weight sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a good righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser. The fuel capacity is originally small. There is a very short water supply range.

Cal 33 for sale elsewhere on the web:

caliber 33 sailboat data

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Seller's Description

Way too much to list,call or email for more info.$60,000 OBO.

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

From BlueWaterBoats.org :

With a loyal following the Caliber 33 is an old favourite with big boat interior in a small package. Designed by company co-founder Michael McCreary the boat was launched in 1985, aimed squarely at the performance conscious cruiser. The design has seen many improvements over the decades and todays offering, the Caliber 35 LRC, is a world class yacht and is considered excellent value on the used market, hold their value and generally sell fast.

Calibers were designed for shallow waters of the East Coast with only four and a half feet of draft in standard form. If that’s not enough, an optional shoal draft version drawing four feet was also available.

With angular lines and a nearly flat sheer, the Caliber 33 quietly blends tradition with a taste of the modern. The underbelly is quite contemporary, with flat front sections leading into a fin keel with a straight leading edge, while the rudder is skeg hung and mounted well aft. The hull is stiff and stable, carrying most of its beam well aft like modern boats, a configuration that makes for generous room belowdecks, enough for comfortable live aboard for a couple and lots of stowage for a 33 footer.

Construction

While there’s nothing especially radical about her design, a high standard of build quality is clearly visible on the boat. The hull is constructed of solid fiberglass, without the use of a pre-fabricated liner commonly seen in modern production yachts of this price range. Instead each bulkhead is secured with two to four layers of hand-laid fiberglass cloth and resin, resulting in a boat with excellent accessibility to all areas of the superstructure. There are substantial and closely spaced floors throughout the bilge.

Decks are fiberglass with a plywood core and the deck-to-hull joint is sealed with a polyurethane adhesive and through bolted to an aluminum toe rail. The overall result is a strong structure, devoid of creaks and groans under stress which is often seen in lesser boats. Some of the early models had some problems with bowsprits that failed under extreme load which was later rectified by Caliber with a beefed-up structure.

Caliber Yachts was founded by two brothers, Michael and George McCreary, fresh out of college in 1980. The two worked on a shoestring budget while George focused on business and marketing and Michael set to work on designing the entire line up of Caliber yachts.

Their first boat was the Caliber 28, a solidly built coastal cruiser that was loaded with features which defined the nature of their sailboats to come. It was received well which helped them follow up with the Caliber 33 in 1985.

Despite being introduced during harder economic times, the Caliber 33 was a success, many attributed this to their quality. A total of seventy boats were built from Caliber’s small plant in Clearwater Florida before the model was evolved into the Caliber 35 in 1990. The newer evolution added a reverse transom that stretched the overall length along with many other refinements.

The latest version, the Caliber 35 LRC, introduced in 1995 adds the LRC suffix denoting “long range cruiser”. The name change was probably for marketing reasons as it came at a time when Caliber introduced the LRC suffix to the Caliber 40 alongside the introduction of a smaller sibling, the Caliber 30 LRC.

Including the seventy Caliber 33 hulls produced prior to 1990, the total production run of all variants produced by Caliber Yachts (Caliber 33, 35 and 35 LRC) stands at over 100 boats.

Links, References and Further Reading

» Jack Horner’s review of the Caliber 33/35 » Sailing Magazine’s review of the Caliber 33 , by John Kretschmer

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IMAGES

  1. Specifications CALIBER 33

    caliber 33 sailboat data

  2. Caliber 33

    caliber 33 sailboat data

  3. The Caliber 33 and 35 Used Boat Revie

    caliber 33 sailboat data

  4. 1989 Caliber 33 sailboat for sale in Florida

    caliber 33 sailboat data

  5. Caliber 33 Specification Brochure

    caliber 33 sailboat data

  6. Caliber 33

    caliber 33 sailboat data

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COMMENTS

  1. CALIBER 33

    40 to 50 indicates a heavy bluewater boat; over 50 indicates an extremely heavy bluewater boat. Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam^1.33), where displacement is expressed in pounds, and length is expressed in feet. Capsize Screening Formula (CSF): Designed to determine if a boat has blue water capability.

  2. Caliber 33

    When the McCreary brothers (Michael, a naval architect, and George, a business major) got out of college, they built a boat in their garage. The next year, 1980, they formed a company and introduced a snappy 28-foot performance cruiser. In 1985, in the midst of boatbuilding's grimmest times, they opened a plant and launched the Caliber 33.

  3. CALIBER 33

    Blue Water Surf Value Rank (BWSVR) 3107. Capsize Comfort Value Rank (CCVR)

  4. Caliber 33

    The Caliber 33 is a big boat tucked into a small package. Designed by company co-founder, Michael McCreary, the 33 is a solidly built cruiser of moderate to slightly heavy proportions and well respected by sailors around the country. First launched in 1985, approximately 70 boats were completed in Caliber's small but efficient plant in ...

  5. Caliber 33

    The Caliber 33 is a 32.5ft cutter designed by Michael McCreary and built in fiberglass by Caliber Yachts (USA) between 1986 and 1991. The Caliber 33 is a moderate weight sailboat which is slightly under powered. It is very stable / stiff and has a good righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser.

  6. Caliber 33

    Caliber 33 is a 32′ 6″ / 9.9 m monohull sailboat designed by Michael McCreary and built by Caliber Yachts between 1986 and 1991. ... Including the seventy Caliber 33 hulls produced prior to 1990, the total production run of all variants produced by Caliber Yachts (Caliber 33, 35 and 35 LRC) stands at over 100 boats. Links, References and ...

  7. Caliber 33 sd

    The Caliber 33 sd is a 32.5ft masthead sloop designed by Michael McCreary and built in fiberglass since 1986. The Caliber 33 sd is a moderate weight sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is reasonably stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser.

  8. Caliber 33 SD

    Caliber 33 SD is a 32′ 6″ / 9.9 m monohull sailboat designed by Michael McCreary and built by Caliber Yachts starting in 1986.

  9. Caliber 33 Bluewater Sailboat

    The Bluewater Sailboat Caliber 33 is a well-liked classic with a large interior in a compact package. The boat, which Michael McCreary, a co-founder of the firm, designed, was introduced in 1985 with a clear focus on the performance-conscious cruiser. The design has undergone numerous advancements over the years, and the current model, the ...

  10. Caliber 33 Sail Data

    Complete Sail Plan Data for the Caliber 33 Sail Data. Sailrite offers free rig and sail dimensions with featured products and canvas kits that fit the boat. ... Sailboat Data ; Caliber 33 Sail Data ; Caliber 33 Sail Data. Pinit. SKU: X-SD-6114 . Quantity discounts available . Quantity Price; Quantity -+ Add to Cart . Details. Details. LOA 32.5 ...

  11. The Caliber 33 and 35 Used Boat Revie

    The original 33 and early 35 models had a 26-gallon fuel capacity while the 35LRC boasts an enormous 120-gallon fuel capacity. They aren't kidding about this long-range cruiser stuff. The sail area to displacement ratio of the Caliber 33/35 averages a conservative 16 with an average displacement length ratio of a less conservative 210.

  12. CALIBER 33 SD

    Blue Water Surf Value Rank (BWSVR) 3601. Capsize Comfort Value Rank (CCVR)

  13. CALIBER 33 SD

    40 to 50 indicates a heavy bluewater boat; over 50 indicates an extremely heavy bluewater boat. Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam^1.33), where displacement is expressed in pounds, and length is expressed in feet. Capsize Screening Formula (CSF): Designed to determine if a boat has blue water capability.

  14. caliber33

    Help Sealing Under Waterline Through Bolts for New Rudder Port. We could really use some good advice! We have recently installed a new bronze rudder port on our Caliber 33. After weeks of work we put our boat back in the water only to discover the bedding underneath our port was leaking! We had them haul us out again, got a brand new Bud ...

  15. Caliber Yachts (USA)

    Caliber Yachts (USA) www.caliberyacht.com. Founded by George and Michael McCreary and located in Clearwater Florida USA. The first model was the CALIBER 28. This was followed by the 30, 33, 35, 40 and 47 all Micheal McCreary designs. Years in Business: 1980 - present.

  16. 1989 Caliber 33 sailboat for sale in Florida

    4.5'. Florida. $24,000. Description: Good opportunity to own a very well made Sailboat. We are the second owners of this Caliber 33. Full refit 2020-2021. New: standing & running rigging, canvas cover for jib & main-sail bag, thruhulls, mast wiring, added compressor to make cool-box fridge/freezer, solar and controller, toilet, plumbing, led ...

  17. Cal 33

    The Cal 33 is a 32.67ft masthead sloop designed by C. William Lapworth and built in fiberglass by Jensen Marine/Cal Boats between 1971 and 1973. 191 units have been built. The Cal 33 is a moderate weight sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a good righting capability if capsized.

  18. Caliber 33

    With a loyal following the Caliber 33 is an old favourite with big boat interior in a small package. Designed by company co-founder Michael McCreary the boat was launched in 1985, aimed squarely at the performance conscious cruiser. The design has seen many improvements over the decades and todays offering, the Caliber 35 LRC, is a world class ...

  19. CAL 33

    40 to 50 indicates a heavy bluewater boat; over 50 indicates an extremely heavy bluewater boat. Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam^1.33), where displacement is expressed in pounds, and length is expressed in feet. Capsize Screening Formula (CSF): Designed to determine if a boat has blue water capability.

  20. Caliber boats for sale

    Type of yachts by Caliber. This boat builder presents a variety of hull types: monohull and displacement. ... 33 and 38. Various Caliber models are currently offered for sale by specialized yacht brokers, dealers and brokerages on YachtWorld, with listings ranging from 1989 year models up to 2008. Caliber By Condition. Used Caliber 23 listings .

  21. caliber 33 Archives

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  22. CAL 33 (HUNT)

    40 to 50 indicates a heavy bluewater boat; over 50 indicates an extremely heavy bluewater boat. Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam^1.33), where displacement is expressed in pounds, and length is expressed in feet. Capsize Screening Formula (CSF): Designed to determine if a boat has blue water capability.

  23. CALIBER 35

    See CALIBER 33 for more details. Updated and renamed again to CALIBER 35 LRC in 1995. Sailboat Forum. View All Topics: ... Like the LWL, it will vary with the weights of fuel, water, stores and equipment. A boat's actual draft is usually somewhat more than the original designed or advertised draft. For boats with adjustable keels ...