life-of-sailing-logo

What Is a Wave Piercing Hull?

What Is a Wave Piercing Hull? | Life of Sailing

Last Updated by

Daniel Wade

August 30, 2022

Plenty of different sailboats allow you to experience life on the sea. One design that can improve your experience is a wave piercing hull.

Some hull designs are catered to certain outcomes, with many of them being debatable. How is a wave piercing hull different from a conventional hull?

A wave piercing hull does exactly what the name suggests, as it helps cut through waves due to its fine bow and reduced buoyancy. Traditional bows will ride a wave, whereas a wave piercing hull slices right through. The rounded bottom and sharp top of the hull give a boat this unique ability.

While wave piercing hulls benefit from cutting through waves, it does not reduce the ability to stay dry. The main focus of this hull design is to maintain forward speed through a wave, so you will be soaked in the process.

According to experienced sailors, some love to use boats with wave piercing hulls since they have minimal resistance through waves. However, this is debatable for sailors that want a smoother ride.

Table of contents

‍ Positives to a Wave Piercing Hull

Wave piercing hulls are either loved or hated by sailors, but it all boils down to how you want to sail. Depending on your sailing goals, you need to understand that there are many options available to reach those goals.

There are a handful of positives to consider in a wave piercing hull. There are variations of a wave piercing hull, such as an axe-bow or reverse hull, that have slightly different characteristics and can provide positives to sailors.

For example, an axe-bow is meant to help the crew be more comfortable and is better suited for medium or larger waves. The boat size, for this type of wave piercing hull variation, is best for smaller vessels. A reverse hull is another name for a wave piercing hull.

Unique Design

In comparison to a traditional bow on a boat, the wave piercing hull offers a longer waterline length. These boats will submerge in the water during rough conditions, but the top of the bow provides an increase in downforce and allows for buoyancy.

The design also allows it to reduce pitching motion, which is when a boat rides a wave and then drops when the wave is going down. This means a smoother ride all around if you are able to cut through a wave, but arguably a wet one.

Wave piercing hulls are a bit slower and do not accelerate as fast as traditional hulls. However, they are likely to remain at a constant speed since they can cut through waves and help you save on fuel.

This can help, in some situations, remain at high speeds in some cruisers or catamarans. In some smaller vessels, this also has a better effect.

The larger the boat, the better, when it comes to the boat’s ability to cut through the waves. The long length will actually cut through waves a little more effectively than smaller vessels.

Reliable in Rough Conditions

When wind and waves are becoming increasingly dangerous, a wave piercing hull could provide a smoother ride. Depending on the situation, you could potentially make the ride more manageable with this type of hull cutting through rough waters.

Since these designs are fairly sleek and slender, it is easier to turn the boat at a higher speed. If you are in a catamaran, this will likely not be the case since that design is much different even with two hulls. No matter what the marine environment is throwing at you, a wave piercing hull can help dramatically in rough waters.

Compared to other traditional hulls, these offer less vibration and noise. When cutting through a wave, you are likely going to feel more than just some vibration, but the overall comfort is much different than a traditional hull.

Drawbacks to Wave Piercing Hulls

Not everyone enjoys a wave piercing hull and that is perfectly fine. Every sailor is going to have their preferences, especially with the traditional boats being the most common.

You could argue that these boats are an acquired taste and need some experience to perform confidently in them. There are definitely some negatives to look at before you decide to purchase one.

Since you are cutting through a wave instead of riding it, there will be water everywhere. On a racer or cruiser, it might not be that big of a deal since they usually experience a lot of water anyway, but on a catamaran, this might not be favorable.

As mentioned, you are not riding a wave’s pitch and are cutting through the water. If you are doing any long trips, this might be undesirable.

If you were to ask an experienced sailor which they would prefer, being dry and safe would be the universal answer all the way around. However, that does not stop many sailors from enjoying the benefits of a wave piercing hull.

Potential Dangers on Deck

Since the deck is constantly wet, this could cause some issues walking around or trying to remain stable on your feet. The slippery surface is one hazard to deal with, which seems to be something sailors are just going to have to deal with.

The other issue is that if you have guests or your crew walking around while you are trying to cut through a wave, they are at risk of being swept off of the deck. If the wave is strong enough, it could potentially push someone off of the deck.

It does not appear to be a friendly environment to be in when waters become rough, especially when the front of the boat is going down into the water. This could also increase the risk of the boat capsizing if mishandled.

Motion and Pitch

If you are used to being on a boat that follows a wave’s pitch, then you are not going to find that here. Following a wave’s contour is not what these hulls are designed to do.

In some instances, too long of a bow might create too much yawing motion or side to side movement. This all depends on how you encounter the wave, but the boat might not be desirable for some sailors.

This will be a new feeling if you are used to riding a wave’s pitch and might even create seasickness for some sailors or their crew. If possible, you might want to experience a ride on one yourself before committing to one.

What to Expect with a Wave Piercing Hull

Out of all of the pros and cons of a wave piercing hull, it is up to the individual sailor on what they could do with or without. Depending on your desired sailing experience, this type of hull could work in your favor.

If you are trying to optimize the best resistance for waves, then a wave piercing hull is a proven design to help combat pitch. Keep in mind that you are going to be wet, essentially the entire time you are on the boat.

You would likely need to utilize clothing fit for wet conditions and quality shoes to help remain stable. You also might want to plan out your trip for shorter stops to make sure you are not overwhelmed in the process.

One of the best things you can do is take a ride on someone else’s wave piercing hull boat and get a good feel for what is going on. This way you can try it and work any issues out so to speak before you decide to buy a boat with this hull design.

Keep in mind that the perfect bow is not going to exist, so take into account what you want to accomplish. Compared to a traditional hull, this could potentially be the hull design for you if you are up for te challenge.

Related Articles

Types of Sailboat Hulls

What Is a Sailboat Hull?

14 Best Monohull Sailboats

I've personally had thousands of questions about sailing and sailboats over the years. As I learn and experience sailing, and the community, I share the answers that work and make sense to me, here on Life of Sailing.

by this author

Sailboat Parts

Most Recent

What Does "Sailing By The Lee" Mean? | Life of Sailing

What Does "Sailing By The Lee" Mean?

October 3, 2023

The Best Sailing Schools And Programs: Reviews & Ratings | Life of Sailing

The Best Sailing Schools And Programs: Reviews & Ratings

September 26, 2023

Important Legal Info

Lifeofsailing.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon. This site also participates in other affiliate programs and is compensated for referring traffic and business to these companies.

Similar Posts

How To Choose The Right Sailing Instructor | Life of Sailing

How To Choose The Right Sailing Instructor

August 16, 2023

Cost To Sail Around The World | Life of Sailing

Cost To Sail Around The World

May 16, 2023

Small Sailboat Sizes: A Complete Guide | Life of Sailing

Small Sailboat Sizes: A Complete Guide

October 30, 2022

Popular Posts

Best Liveaboard Catamaran Sailboats | Life of Sailing

Best Liveaboard Catamaran Sailboats

December 28, 2023

Can a Novice Sail Around the World? | Life of Sailing

Can a Novice Sail Around the World?

Elizabeth O'Malley

June 15, 2022

Best Electric Outboard Motors | Life of Sailing

4 Best Electric Outboard Motors

How Long Did It Take The Vikings To Sail To England? | Life of Sailing

How Long Did It Take The Vikings To Sail To England?

10 Best Sailboat Brands | Life of Sailing

10 Best Sailboat Brands (And Why)

December 20, 2023

7 Best Places To Liveaboard A Sailboat | Life of Sailing

7 Best Places To Liveaboard A Sailboat

Get the best sailing content.

Top Rated Posts

Lifeofsailing.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon. This site also participates in other affiliate programs and is compensated for referring traffic and business to these companies. (866) 342-SAIL

© 2024 Life of Sailing Email: [email protected] Address: 11816 Inwood Rd #3024 Dallas, TX 75244 Disclaimer Privacy Policy

Wave-Piercing Vessels

  • First Online: 30 October 2018

Cite this chapter

wave piercing catamaran

  • Liang Yun 4 ,
  • Alan Bliault 5 &
  • Huan Zong Rong 4  

1009 Accesses

In the next three chapters, we will introduce a number of hybrid vessel types linked with the catamaran configuration that aim to improve seakeeping and seagoing performance. We start with the wave-piercing catamaran (WPC) and then continue with the small-waterplane-area twin hull (SWATH) in Chap. 9 and other multihulls in Chap. 10 . We will briefly touch on the WPC plus air cushion support in this chapter, SWATH plus air cushion support in the next chapter, and concepts such as the tunnel planing craft (TPC) and super-slender twin hull (SSTH) in Chap. 10 to give a flavor of the challenges presented by hybrid designs and the performance tradeoffs that they introduce. There are similarly a number of options for vessels with a central hull and outrigger support, such as the high-speed trimaran and the pentamaran. These can also employ additional concept adjustments such as hydrofoils to enhance performance. We will give a flavor of these also in Chap. 10 .

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
  • Durable hardcover edition

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Bliault A, Yun L (2000) Theory and design of air cushion craft. Arnold/Elsevier, UK, ISBN 0 340 67650 7 and 0 470 23621 3 (Wiley), 632 pp

Google Scholar  

Yun L, Bliault A, Doo J (2010) WIG craft and ekranoplan, ground effect craft technology. Springer, New York, ISBN 978-1-4419-0041-8

Song GH (1987) Catamaran class B, research & design of ships, vol 11. Chinese Naval Ships Academy, Beijing, China (in Chinese)

Faltinsen OM (1991) Speed loss & operability of catamaran & SES in a sea way. In: FAST’91 proceedings

Sato R, Miyata H (1991) Hydrodynamic design of fast ferries by the concept of super slender twin hull. In: Proceedings of FAST 91, Trondheim

Mao T, Ming T (1996) Novel hybrid craft – experimental investigation on wave piercing air cushion catamaran craft (WPAC). In: Information & trend. High Performance Marine Vehicle Design Subcommittee of CSNAME, Shanghai (in Chinese)

Lu X-P et al (1999) Investigation on resistance of WPC (in Chinese). In: 8th national seminar on high performance ships

Zhao L-E et al (1995) Investigation on performances and hull form design of wave piercing catamaran (in Chinese). In: Symposium on seminar of ship resistance and performance

Rong H-Z (2002) Application of linearized theory of wave resistance to HACAT, SWATH and wave piercing catamaran (in Chinese). Research report, MARIC

Download references

Author information

Authors and affiliations.

Marine Design and Research Institute of China, Shanghai, China

Liang Yun & Huan Zong Rong

Naval Architect, Sola, Norway

Alan Bliault

You can also search for this author in PubMed   Google Scholar

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2019 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature

About this chapter

Yun, L., Bliault, A., Rong, H.Z. (2019). Wave-Piercing Vessels. In: High Speed Catamarans and Multihulls. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7891-5_8

Download citation

DOI : https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7891-5_8

Published : 30 October 2018

Publisher Name : Springer, New York, NY

Print ISBN : 978-1-4939-7889-2

Online ISBN : 978-1-4939-7891-5

eBook Packages : Engineering Engineering (R0)

Share this chapter

Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:

Sorry, a shareable link is not currently available for this article.

Provided by the Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative

  • Publish with us

Policies and ethics

  • Find a journal
  • Track your research

This website has been archived and is no longer updated.

  • Powerhouse Museum
  • Hours and charges
  • Events and activities
  • How to get here
  • Activities for kids
  • Disability access
  • Become a member
  • Cafes and food
  • Current exhibitions
  • Coming soon
  • Travelling exhibitions
  • Previous exhibitions
  • Powerhouse Discovery Centre
  • Education Programs
  • Teachers notes and resources
  • Specialist studios
  • The Mars Lab
  • Lace Study Centre
  • Search/browse our collection
  • New acquisitions
  • Making a donation
  • Hedda Morrison photographic collection
  • Sydney 2000 Games collection
  • Australian Dress Register
  • Specialist research services
  • Museum archives
  • Research library
  • Photo library
  • Conservation
  • Object Name Thesaurus
  • Regional programs & services
  • Migration Heritage Centre
  • Show all online resources
  • Collection database
  • Inside the Collection blog
  • D*Hub: Unpacking design
  • Photo of the Day
  • Online games for kids
  • Open house: museum conversations
  • Mobile Apps

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

  • About Aeroyacht
  • Aeroyacht Design
  • Aeroyacht TV
  • Mission Statement & Privacy Policy
  • Aeroyacht Racing
  • Favorite Links
  • Customer Testimonials
  • Office Location
  • BUY A MULTIHULL
  • Specifications
  • Photo Gallery
  • Try Before You Buy
  • Yacht Ownership and Demo Sails
  • BUY A POWER CATAMARAN
  • Yacht Business Ownership FAQ
  • MULTIHULLS FOR SALE
  • Aeroyacht Superyacht Catamarans
  • Global Multihull Search
  • Buy A Multihull
  • Sell a Multihull
  • Multihull News
  • Publications & Articles
  • Commissioning & Delivery Services
  • Wave-Piercing Bows

WAVE-PIERCING BOW TECHNOLOGY EXPLAINED

by Gregor Tarjan photo:  Billy Black

Wave-piercing bows – or reverse or hammerhead bows are part of today’s cutting edge naval architecture and the latest thinking in go fast comfort. Versus conventional overhanging or straight stem bows, wave-piercing bows are reversed and are designed to cut through waves, increase performance by reducing pitch resistance. The added benefit is not only higher speeds but a much more comfortable motion at sea.

There are several reasons to consider designing a boat with reverse rake bows. The primary rationale why we consider this hull shape is to reduce pitching motion caused by waves of certain amplitude and frequency. I think an easy way to explain it is this: Assume you are sailing along in smooth water with a conventional shaped hull with no pitching motion. Along comes a single wave. As your bow starts to penetrate into the wave, you pick up buoyancy in the overhanging bow region. The boat reacts to this increase in buoyancy by pitching bow-up. As the wave passes under the boat, the bow then must fall back to equilibrium. The more reserve buoyancy the wave sees as the bow penetrates through the wave, the more pitching moment is imparted onto the boat by the wave and the greater the potential for pitching motion. So if your bow has a lot of overhang or flare (vertical angle of the hull sides), then you naturally have a lot of reserve buoyancy high up in the bow region and this may result in excessive pitching motion. Of course the downside to a reverse -wave piercing bow might be a slightly wetter ride on a small multihull such as a beach cat, but on cats larger than 35′ this is hardly an issue.

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

Morrelli & Melvin designed 62′ catamaran

Why do we care if the boat pitches? Because pitching increases hull resistance, reduces the efficiency of the rig and underwater foils due to unsteady flow, and causes motion discomfort for the people on the boat. In order to keep the boat from pitch poling (or turning back over front), you need a certain amount of buoyancy forward. On a wave-piercing type bow, this buoyancy and lift are achieved by making the hull fuller down low. On some wave piercing designs, the hull is wider at the waterline than at the deck, especially near the bow. The wider, flatter underwater shape provides lift at high velocities and dampens pitching at all speeds. Other benefits of wave piercing bows are reduced weight and wind age. You can really feel this difference on medium displacement and light weight multihulls. The older designs with tall bows get pushed around in higher wind and sea states whereas the newer wave piercers are easier to steer and maneuver in waves.

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

Variations of these shapes are now making their way into some larger racing and cruising designs – such as our own, giant Aeroyacht 85′, 110′ and 125′ catamarans. Other boats worth mentioning are the Morrelli Melvin 62′ and 65′, some McConaghy multihulls (from 50-80′) the advanced Neel 47′ and 51′ trimarans and the new range of Sunreef custom catamarans. The faster and longer your boat, the more sense reverse bows make. Today even America’s Cup racing yachts all feature reverse bows and they are definitely part of our boating future.

  • Catamaran Learning Center
  • Catamarans vs. Monohulls
  • Catamaran Speed
  • Catamaran Efficiency
  • Catamaran Stability
  • Catamaran Safety
  • Catamaran Shallow Draft
  • Catamaran No Heel Sailing
  • Catamarans and Seasickness
  • Catamaran Space
  • Catamaran Boat Handling
  • Catamaran Advantages over Monohulls

Catamaran News

The Stunning Interior Design of the McConaghy Multihull Range

The Stunning Interior Design of the McConaghy Multihull Range

Nautitech Spareparts – Order Simple and Quick

Nautitech Spareparts – Order Simple and Quick

For Immediate Delivery – Nautitech 44 Owner Version

For Immediate Delivery – Nautitech 44 Owner Version

Yannick Bestaven’s NEEL 47 Trimaran

Yannick Bestaven’s NEEL 47 Trimaran

Conser 47/50′ FOR SALE

Conser 47/50′ FOR SALE

  • Catamaran Steering Positions
  • Catamaran Sailing Schools
  • Catamaran Insurance
  • Catamaran Charter Business and Tax Savings
  • Ask the Owner
  • 5 Valuable Tips
  • Survey Checklist
  • Sea Trial Checklist
  • MULTIHULLS & CATAMARANS App for Iphone
  • Catamaran Surveys
  • Multihull Services
  • Catamaran Build Consultation
  • Financing Services
  • Catamaran Repair & Service Facilities
  • Catamaran Demo Rides & Shows
  • Catamarans for China
  • Yacht Design
  • Interior Styling & Yacht Art
  • Photography

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

Planet Sail tests a McConaghy Multihull

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

Charles Caudrelier wins Arkea Ultim Challenge

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

Nautitech 48 – Control of the Wind

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

Boat Test: Nautitech 48 Open catamaran

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

NEEL 52 Trimaran VIDEO – Sailing at 17 knots

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

McConaghy MC63 Power Tourer – showing her pace

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

Nautitech 48 Open catamaran – Video

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

Nautitech 48 catamaran – Interior Design

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

How the Nautitech 48 catamaran was conceived – Designer Comments.

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

Launched ! – McConaghy MC82P Power

Helpful tips from aeroyacht.

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

AEROYACHT PUBLICATIONS

Catamaran books by gregor tarjan.

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

JOIN AEROYACHT’S NEWSLETTER

Aeroyacht Multihull Specialists Catamarans for Sale

Switch language:

ST

Saint John Paul II High Speed Wave Piercing Catamaran

Saint John Paul II is a high-speed vehicle passenger (RoPax) ferry built by Incat Tasmania shipyard in Hobart, Australia, for Virtu Ferries, a Maltese ferry services operator. It is the world’s second biggest catamaran to operate at more than 70km/h.

Vessel Type

High-speed catamaran ferry

Virtu Ferries

Incat Tasmania

Construction Started

February 2019

Length Overall

wave piercing catamaran

A contract worth approximately $80m for the design and construction of the ferry was awarded to Incat Tasmania by Virtu Ferries in October 2016. The planning and design phase of the project lasted for approximately one year.

Recommended White Papers

Whitepaper

AIDAnova Put to the Test

Sustainable water solutions for the marine industry, recommended buyers guides.

Buyers-Guide

Marine corrosion inhibitors: Control, prevention and protection

Sustainable shipping companies and solutions.

Construction on the ship began in 2017 and its launching ceremony was held in December 2018. The ship was delivered in February 2019.

The wave-piercing catamaran joins Virtu Ferries’ existing fleet of 14 high-speed craft. It allows the company to provide year-round fast-ferry services between Malta and Sicily in the Mediterranean Sea basin with increased reliability and passenger comfort.

Saint John Paul II catamaran design

Saint John Paul II  features a wave-piercing  catamaran  hull structure with two slender hulls built using welded and bonded aluminium. The hulls are connected by a bridging section. A wave-piercing type bow is installed in the centre line to provide increased speed and a comfortable voyage at sea.

The high-speed catamaran is built in line with the standards of DNV-GL classification society. Design techniques and safety features of the ferry are designed in compliance with International Code of Safety for High Speed Craft (HSC) 2000 adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

The ferry complies with the requirements of Italian Port State and is registered under Malta Flag following the receipt of necessary approvals.

With a dead weight of 1,000t, the vessel can carry up to 900 passengers. The overall length and breadths of the vessel are 110.6m and 28.2m respectively.

Deck details of Saint John Paul II

The high-speed wave-piercing catamaran vessel is equipped with two passenger decks, containing four lounges.

The interior is designed to offer three classes of seating with economy, VIP, and business class. It incorporates 996 indoor passenger seats and 138 outdoor passenger seats.

The garage deck of the ferry can accommodate up to 23 heavy commercial trailers / 167 cars / 490 truck lane metres.

Up to two rigid hulled boats are carried at the stern of the ship to for transportation at sea. The boats are launched or retrieved using a crane.

Operation and control of the vessel are performed from the wheelhouse located amid ships. Marine radars and  communication  systems are fitted atop the wheelhouse to ensure safe operation of the ferry.

Large windows on the passenger deck and bridge areas provide an unobstructed view of the sea.

Propulsion details

The Saint John Paul II RoPax ferry is powered by four MTU 20V 8000 series diesel engines, each generating an output power of 9,100kW.

The vessel’s  propulsion  system comprises four Wärtsilä LJX 1500 SRI modular waterjets, which ensure fast and reliable operation of the ferry by providing a 10% reduction in weight and improved fuel efficiency.

The high-speed wave-piercing catamaran is installed with a Lipstronic control system, also developed by Wärtsilä, for controlling vessel speed, relative load, pitch and rotations per minute (rpm).

Saint John Paul II performance

Virtu Ferries’ new wave-piercing catamaran has a service speed of 38k. The ferry is capable of completing its journey from Malta and Sicily in approximately 90 minutes.

The ship’s slender demi-hulls provide low wave-making resistance and high transverse stability.

Contractors involved

Incat Tasmania awarded a contract to Wärtsilä in April 2017 for the supply of water jet cutters.

Australian company Revolution Design provided design and architectural solutions for Virtu Ferries’ new RoPax ferry (hull number 089). The ship’s design was also supported by Seaspeed Marine Consulting.

Related Projects

 alt=

More Projects

 alt=

Radio controlled shunter supporting ports in Finland 

Spanish port grapples with allegations of ships carrying arms to israel, rhine port of kehl launches feasibility study for wind energy, india and iran strengthen chabahar port partnership with new deal, sign up for our daily news round-up.

Give your business an edge with our leading industry insights.

Sign up to the newsletter

Your corporate email address.

Ship Technology In Brief

Ship Technology Global

I consent to Verdict Media Limited collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with Privacy Policy

Thank you for subscribing

View all newsletters from across the GlobalData Media network.

Advertisement

Issue Cover

  • Previous Article
  • Next Article

Slam Loads and Kinematics of Wave-Piercing Catamarans During Bow Entry Events in Head Seas

  • Split-Screen
  • Open the PDF for in another window
  • View This Citation
  • Add to Citation Manager
  • Get Permissions
  • Search Site

Shabani, Babak, Lavroff, Jason, Davis, Michael R., Holloway, Damien S., and Giles A. Thomas. "Slam Loads and Kinematics of Wave-Piercing Catamarans During Bow Entry Events in Head Seas." J Ship Res 62 (2018): 134–155. doi: https://doi.org/10.5957/JOSR.180001

Download citation file:

  • Ris (Zotero)
  • Reference Manager

Centre bow (CB) design for wave-piercing catamarans (WPCs) is a critical compromise between minimization of slamming and protection against deck diving. To inform the design process, this article investigates the slam loads and kinematics during bow entry events in regular head seas for a 112-m WPC with systematic variations to its CB and wet-deck geometry. Model tests using a 2.5-m hydroelastic segmented catamaran considered five different CB configurations, designated as the parent, high, low, long, and short CB. The results indicated that changes in the CB length had little effect on the general kinematic trends obtained for the pitch, heave, and bow vertical displacement at the instant of slamming, but increasing the wet-deck height resulted in an increase in heave (but not pitch) at slamming. Two new design ratios are proposed. The CB immersion depth to arch height ratio showed slamming occurring in the range of 0.3–0.6 depending on the wave encounter frequency and the CB configuration. The CB buoyancy in the encountered waves was estimated by considering both immersion depth and area along the CB in waves through relative motion analyses. It was found that the buoyancy to slam force ratio increased with increasing wet-deck height but not with increasing CB length. This suggests that an optimal CB configuration could be achieved by first modifying the arched cross-structure to reduce the arch filling effect on slamming severity and then maximizing the CB buoyancy to slam force ratio by increasing either the wet-deck height or the CB length.

An above-water centre bow (CB) for improving seakeeping is a feature of modern wave-piercing catamarans (WPCs) (Soars 1993; Boulton 1998; Fang & Chan 2007; Dubrovsky 2014). Figure 1 shows a 112-m Incat WPC with the CB located between the two demihulls.

There are several important factors to be considered when designing such a central bow. First, the reserve buoyancy offered by the CB is the primary design factor for providing a pitchrestoring moment and eliminating deck diving in the following waves (Davis & Whelan 2007). Second, the CB configuration can influence the slamming loads in WPCs during bow entry in waves (Lavroff et al. 2013). This is due to the complex fluid-structure interaction in the CB area. When the CB enters waves, the water gradually fills the spaces between the CB and demihulls, referred to here as archways, and may result in complete closure of the archways and slamming in excessive pitch conditions. Finally, the frequency of slamming occurrence is, to some extent, related to the CB design as it contributes to lateral jet flow during the CB entry. As a result, slamming may occur in even partial water entrapment below the arch wet-deck cross-structure, which could be the case in small pitch motions (Lavroff & Davis 2015).

Email Alerts

Suggested reading, affiliations.

  • Online ISSN 1542-0604
  • Print ISSN 0022-4502
  • Conferences
  • Content Alerts
  • SPE Member Pricing
  • Terms of Use

Sign In or Register to Continue

Sign In or Register

Yachthub

Incat Wavepiercer Passenger Ferry

Used boats for sale, commercial vessels,        incat boats for sale.

wave piercing catamaran

3D Virtual Tour

Click anywhere on this image to start the tour

Incat Wavepiercer Passenger Ferry

Buy with Confidence

wave piercing catamaran

Log in or Sign up

You are using an out of date browser. It may not display this or other websites correctly. You should upgrade or use an alternative browser .

Super economical wave piercing catamaran cruisers

Discussion in ' Boat Design ' started by Greenseas2 , Feb 4, 2008 .

Greenseas2

Greenseas2 Senior Member

In St Thomas there is a fleet of passenger carrying wave piercing catamarans that are owned by Dohm's Water taxi and built by Gold Coast Yachts of St. Croix. The outboard powered work horses are definitely fast with their elongated bows and are inexpensive to operate. The long narrow low friction hulls slice through the waves with ease. The deckhouses on the larger boats are quite spacious and elevated well above the hulls. It doesn't appear that deck space has been sacrificed by the design and the superstructure is only moderately streamlined. It would appear that the wave piercing catamarans of this particular design would be ideal for long distance live aboard cruisers whose primary focus is on fuel economy. A large version of the wave piercing design may be seen in Key West. It's used for taking passengers out to the Dry Tortugas and is inherently stable. One really great aspect of the design is that it leaves almost no wake at full throttle when operating in what could be considered past-hull-speed in monohulls. The construction of the boats is composite wood/epoxy and should be well within the building ability of dedicated amateurs. Other than a very futuristic look, I can find no faults with the design and feel that there is a good future use for it with private as well as commercial applications.  

rwatson

rwatson Senior Member

I have had the experience of riding in "wave piercing" commercial catamarans - (developed by Incat in Australia), and one design fault became obvious - the ride motion in fairly calm water at high speed. I have expressed my opinion in a several threads on boat comfort over the last few months, but in brief they developed the name of "Spew Cats", and lasted only two seasons as ferries in open seas off southern australia. I and most other passengers got queasy riding them in calm seas because the narrow hulls resulted in lots of 'dipping' as they did indeed slice through long smooth swells. It was like being in the back seat of a car where the suspension is way too soft. In calmish waters, the ride on conventional hulls with stabilisers is much more agreeable. I guess in rough seas, everyone gets sick no matter what type of boat, but to get queasy in fine weather is not a great feature.  

Manie B

Manie B Senior Member

Any websites or pics available ???  

tom28571

tom28571 Senior Member

rwatson said: ↑ I have had the experience of riding in "wave piercing" commercial catamarans - (developed by Incat in Australia), and one design fault became obvious - the ride motion in fairly calm water at high speed. I have expressed my opinion in a several threads on boat comfort over the last few months, but in brief they developed the name of "Spew Cats", and lasted only two seasons as ferries in open seas off southern australia. I and most other passengers got queasy riding them in calm seas because the narrow hulls resulted in lots of 'dipping' as they did indeed slice through long smooth swells. It was like being in the back seat of a car where the suspension is way too soft. In calmish waters, the ride on conventional hulls with stabilisers is much more agreeable. I guess in rough seas, everyone gets sick no matter what type of boat, but to get queasy in fine weather is not a great feature. Click to expand...

SeaSpark

A super economical boat will never go really fast, does anyone have experience on a wave piercing cat at lower speeds, say lower than or only a bit above the hull speed of a displacement boat at the same length?  

Fanie

Fanie Fanie

Reading Rwatson's post on this I can only agree with him. If the hull's don't move right with the water then you are going to get seasick, that's a given. Super piercing hulls go through waves, often with the oposite motion (or not obvious or predicted motion). Me, I'll just stick to something that moves right. Besides, what's the fun going to be when there's no motion ? Aint that called 'land' ?  
"does anyone have experience on a wave piercing cat at lower speeds" I can tell you about wave piercing hull performance at moderate speeds, based on a 20 ft trimaran. I built the centre hull with a really fine entry, and when powered by a 6hp outboard, it was a real joy at around 10 knots. The wave piercing meant that in short uncomfortable chops, the boat wasnt knocked around like traditional runabouts. It stayed wonderfully level and comfortable. Being a trimaran, fishing was great, as the small swells didnt make the boat rock badly at anchor, which had been the bane of many fishermen in the 'standard' fishing boat.  
Ive ridden both the Key West wave piercer in rough weather and the Dohm's boat in St. Thomas and didn't experience adverse motion on either. I also had an opportunity to discuss economy of operation with the crews and found out that fuel consumption was less than half of an equivalent monohull. The drift of the thread is more toward speed and economical cruising in relatively protected waters. Of course, we can all introduce extremes that could make seasoned mariners heave their cookies. The economy of operation of a wave piercer would make it an ideal long distance cruiser on the ICW. It also has good load carrying capability.  
Do note however, I was complaining about SMOOTH weather operations. My observations were that under autopilot, the small course corrections (say every 3 -5 minutes) were done by increasing pressure from one or other of the twin waterjets. This caused the accellerated hull to dip - giving the very uncomfortable feeling of being in a car whose driver was accellerating and turning the wheel every 3 minutes - most puke provoking. They would have done better to have some sort of small rudder/trim tab to do the small course corrections I think. In rough weather, all boats are the pits!  

SaltOntheBrain

SaltOntheBrain Senior Member

Hey Geenseas, When I lived down there, one of those water taxi's hit a big wave on the south shore of St. John. It blew the windows out and scattered debris all over the place. Here's my opinion: Those boats are fantastic for what they were designed for, which is a smooth ride in confused chop up to three or four foot wave height, but that bridge deck is an un-aero-hydro-dynamic wall not meant to meet big waves head-on. Guys, when he called them fast, he's only talking about 20 knots or so, which is a lot higher than displacement speed, and is a pretty good rate of travel in the chop we saw most days down there. I grew up fishing the Texas Coast, and when I moved down there, I never could figure how to time the waves in my little boat, I was always getting beat up and tired. Then I watched the water from a plane one day and notices a cross-hatch wave pattern. Waves came from two directions. From the SE (Caribbean) and from the NE( Atlantic). It was brutal in a small monohull, but those Gold Coast cats ate it up. I just don't think they'd make a good cruising boat in the open ocean. Lance.  

kengrome

kengrome Senior Member

In St Thomas there is a fleet of passenger carrying wave piercing catamarans that are owned by Dohm's Water taxi and built by Gold Coast Yachts of St. Croix. Click to expand...

[​IMG]

masalai masalai

Ken, I am still researching, but have a look in my gallery. There is several pictures of a 10 metre Robin Chamberlin design which had 2 x 50 hp kubuto engines and did 16 knots for a 12 knot cruise getting near 1 litre/mile. John is building a 12 m version in Brisbane now. I hope to see it before it goes to the buyer... should be ready in a couple of months.... Robin now lives in Tasmania (I think??)  
Hi Malasai, The Chamberlain boat certainly looks efficient with those very slim hulls! There's a new design I'm interested in investigating further, it is called "Derby Gravel Truck" (DGT) and it's from a little known designer by the name of Jeff Gilbert, a Kiwi who lives and works in Australia. Jeff's boat is smaller, and although it is designed for efficiency he has also given it a very desirable safety feature: Derby Gravel Truck is a genuine SELF-RIGHTING catamaran! I guess he figured that if he could design a self-righting cruising power catamaran he will have accomplished something no one else in the world has managed to do. He gets his efficiency from the catamaran design of course, but it could be said that the proper classification for this boat is a motor sailer since he also specifies twin "downwind sails" to help with efficiency whenever the boat is moving in the right direction, which theoreticlaly should be at least half the time, right? Here's a preliminary sketch, which as you can see is particularly 'rustic' in terms of its appearance. Personally I very much enjoy seeing boats designed to look like real old fashioned working boats, rather than the high-tech 'space ships' that so many designers are producing these days: Note that Jeff has nothing more than the premininary sketches of this boat at the moment. The plans are probably a year off or more since he is finishing his last year of "real employment" this year, after which he intends to devote full time to his boat design work. Fortunately Jeff is very proficient at designing with the actual materials in mind. What I mean by this is that he considers every piece that goes into the boat and tries to design for the efficient and economical use of materials -- to keep the actual building costs as low as possible so that "less than wealthy" retirees can afford his boats. Here are the rest of his sketches: That's the grand total of all the images he has made public at this point in time. I have them in my gallery in case anyone wants to see larger views. Sorry for going off-topic here, I'll stop now so the conversation can continue on wave-piercing hulls ...  
It is still "wave piercing"... Thanks for the other offer too...  
  • Advertisement:
It is still "wave piercing"... Click to expand...

Steve W

Any super economical motorboats out there?

schakel

A ground effect boat: The super Boo

jehardiman

Submersible Superyacht

Squidly-Diddly

super-size 15'4" Grumman SportBoat into 23'6" SportsUtilityVessel?

Quidnic

Superbrick challenge $1000 prize if you build her

mustafaumu sarac

Straight Lines Segments connects Sharp Angles - Thin sharp angle Supersonic inspired Hydrofoil

newbeee

Superyacht concepts

Kkuzmicki14

Help redesigning hull of custom jet ski jet boat powered by supercharged 572 jet propelled by Scott

Radenpm9

Superstructure design factors

Vitmus

super custom 70+ft cat. need feedback

  • No, create an account now.
  • Yes, my password is:
  • Forgot your password?

Boat Design Net

wave piercing catamaran

wave piercing catamaran

IMAGES

  1. 30m Wave Piercing Catamaran Ferry

    wave piercing catamaran

  2. 065

    wave piercing catamaran

  3. 30m Wave Piercing Catamaran Utility Craft

    wave piercing catamaran

  4. Saint John Paul II High Speed Wave Piercing Catamaran

    wave piercing catamaran

  5. 30m Wave Piercing Catamaran Ferry

    wave piercing catamaran

  6. World's Fastest Ship Incat's Wave Piercing Catamaran

    wave piercing catamaran

VIDEO

  1. Rogue 90' displacment catamaran Explorer crew's quarters

  2. New Inflatable Boat

  3. Veecraft 30m Wave piercer

  4. Incat Hull 068 Akane Sea Trials

  5. Incat Hull 059 Hai Xia Hao, During Sea Trials before beginning service on the Taiwan Strait

  6. How To Create Mermaid Waves Using Babe Waves Jumbo Hair Waving Iron By Trademark Beauty

COMMENTS

  1. Incat

    Incat Industry Shipbuilding Founded 1977 Founder Bob Clifford Headquarters Derwent Park, Tasmania Products Wave-piercing catamarans Owner Bob Clifford Website www.incat.com.au Incat Tasmania is an Australian manufacturer of high-speed craft (HSC) catamaran ferries. Its greatest success has been with large, sea going passenger and vehicle ferries, but it has also built military transports and ...

  2. World's Fastest Ship: Incat's Wave Piercing Catamaran

    Built at Incat's shipyards in Hobart, Tasmania, this is the world's fastest ship. With a cargo of over 1,000 passengers and 150 cars, the 99-meter catamaran ...

  3. What Is a Wave Piercing Hull?

    A wave piercing hull does exactly what the name suggests, as it helps cut through waves due to its fine bow and reduced buoyancy. Traditional bows will ride a wave, whereas a wave piercing hull slices right through. The rounded bottom and sharp top of the hull give a boat this unique ability. While wave piercing hulls benefit from cutting ...

  4. Custom Wave Piercing Catamaran boats for sale

    Custom Wave piercing catamaran By Condition. Used Custom Wave piercing catamaran 1 listing. Find Custom Wave Piercing Catamaran boats for sale in your area & across the world on YachtWorld. Offering the best selection of Custom boats to choose from.

  5. Wave-piercing hull

    Axe bow - Wave-piercing type of a ship's bow; Bulbous bow - Protruding bulb at the front of a ship; Earthrace - 24m wave-piercing power trimaran, later renamed MY Ady Gil; HMAS Jervis Bay (AKR 45) HSV-2 Swift - Hybrid catamaran; Incat - Manufacturer of large high-speed craft catamarans, a pioneer of the design; Inverted bow - Bow whose farthest forward point is not at the top

  6. Wave-Piercing Vessels

    The concept for a wave-piercing craft is a hybrid combining elements of a catamaran, semi-SWATH, and semiplaning monohull high-speed vessel. The advantages and disadvantages of the three types individually are summarized briefly in the following table.

  7. Wave Piercing Catamaran

    The Wave Piercing Catamaran is a good example of innovation through the combination of two technologies. The traditional catamaran, developed over the centuries by South Pacific cultures, is a fast, stable, two-hulled boat, but on choppy seas it gives a rough ride. In 1984 New Zealand-born Phil Hercus successfully combined the strength and ...

  8. Wave impact loads on wave-piercing catamarans

    Wave slamming is investigated for the 112 m INCAT wave-piercer catamaran with reference to experimental work conducted at full scale, numerical computation by CFD and FEA and testing at model scale using a 2.5 m segmented hydro-elastic model.The segmented model was tested in regular head seas to investigate the magnitude and location of the dynamic wave slam force and slam induced hull bending ...

  9. Slam loads and pressures acting on high-speed wave-piercing catamarans

    The effects of CB length on slamming loads and pressures for a wave piercing catamaran were investigated using a 2.5 m hydroelastic segmented catamaran model in regular head-sea waves. Three CB length were tested that represented 18%, 24% and 30% of the overall model length. Slamming pressures were measured by 18 pressure transducers.

  10. Natchan World, INCAT 112m wave-piercing catamaran

    A hydro-elastic 2.5 m wave piercing catamaran model with a short centre bow has been tested in random head seas. Slamming wave impacts were found to be close to the aft end of the short centre bow.

  11. Wave-Piercing Bows

    Wave-piercing bows - or reverse or hammerhead bows are part of today's cutting edge naval architecture and the latest thinking in catamaran go fast comfort. ... 110′ and 125′ catamarans. Other boats worth mentioning are the Morrelli Melvin 62′ and 65′, some McConaghy multihulls (from 50-80′) the advanced Neel 47′ and 51′ trimarans ...

  12. Saint John Paul II High Speed Wave Piercing Catamaran

    The high-speed wave-piercing catamaran is installed with a Lipstronic control system, also developed by Wärtsilä, for controlling vessel speed, relative load, pitch and rotations per minute (rpm). Saint John Paul II performance. Virtu Ferries' new wave-piercing catamaran has a service speed of 38k. The ferry is capable of completing its ...

  13. 72ft Wave Piercing Hull Design

    www.floethyachts.comThis is a 72ft wave piercing catamaran hull design. Please visit out factory to see the real boat. To be launched 2017

  14. Slam Loads and Kinematics of Wave-Piercing Catamarans During ...

    Centre bow (CB) design for wave-piercing catamarans (WPCs) is a critical compromise between minimization of slamming and protection against deck diving. To inform the design process, this article investigates the slam loads and kinematics during bow entry events in regular head seas for a 112-m WPC with systematic variations to its CB and wet-deck geometry. Model tests using a 2.5-m ...

  15. INCAT Wave Piercing Catamaran Tour & Review

    In this video, I tour and Review the new INCAT Wave Piercing Catamaran. If you did enjoy the video, a like and subscribe would be greatly appreciated.My Main...

  16. Used Incat Wavepiercer Passenger Ferry for Sale

    AU $2,900,000 Plus GST if applicable. Introducing the MV2000 - A state of the art Wave Piercer Catamaran - This incredible Passenger Ferry provides endless commercial and recreational opportunities! Engineered to optimise speed, performance and comfortable long range cruising, this Catamaran has been designed to cut through waves with ease ...

  17. 2003 Custom Wave Piercing Catamaran Power Catamaran for sale

    A custom build and designed Wave Piercing Catamaran, this vessel is a strong, robust expedition motor yacht designed to cross oceans that does not sacrifice comfort for functionality. Guest cabins are roomy; the vessel features 2 double cabin and 1 twin cabin with en suite bathrooms and individual wardrobes on the main deck.

  18. Super economical wave piercing catamaran cruisers

    Greenseas2 Senior Member. In St Thomas there is a fleet of passenger carrying wave piercing catamarans that are owned by Dohm's Water taxi and built by Gold Coast Yachts of St. Croix. The outboard powered work horses are definitely fast with their elongated bows and are inexpensive to operate. The long narrow low friction hulls slice through ...

  19. 628DirtRooster

    Welcome to the 628DirtRooster website where you can find video links to Randy McCaffrey's (AKA DirtRooster) YouTube videos, community support and other resources for the Hobby Beekeepers and the official 628DirtRooster online store where you can find 628DirtRooster hats and shirts, local Mississippi honey and whole lot more!

  20. Touring BOTH Skins for the INCAT Wave Piercing Catamaran

    In this video, I showcase the Reef and Express skins for the INCAT Wave Piercing Catamaran. If you did enjoy this video, a like and subscribe would be greatl...

  21. Flag of Elektrostal, Moscow Oblast, Russia : r/vexillology

    596K subscribers in the vexillology community. A subreddit for those who enjoy learning about flags, their place in society past and present, and…

  22. Elektrostal Map

    Elektrostal is a city in Moscow Oblast, Russia, located 58 kilometers east of Moscow. Elektrostal has about 158,000 residents. Mapcarta, the open map.

  23. UUDO

    Heliport information about UUDO - Orlovo, MOS, RU. Information on this site may not be accurate or current and is not valid for flight planning or navigation.