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10 Most Famous Ship Paintings

One of the most iconic painting niches in the world is that of ship paintings. For centuries, the world’s seas were dominated by various nations who sent trading vessels and warships out into the blue horizon.

Over many years, these ships became the lifeblood of the economies of certain countries like Portugal and Great Britain, their crews bringing and delivering precious cargo of all kinds.

Ships of all shapes and sizes have sailed the seas for more than a thousand years. The juxtaposition of a sophisticated man-made ship with the unpredictable and dangerous nature of the ocean and Mother Nature itself is part of what draws the admiration of so many art lovers and enthusiasts, especially along coastal regions.

Many artists throughout history have dabbled in producing works that featured ships and their legendary voyages on the high seas with some focusing solely on the subject of maritime travel. Here are some of the most famous ship paintings ever created.

Famous Ship Paintings

1. the fighting temeraire tugged to her last berth to be broken up   – j.m.w turner.

The Fighting Temeraire Tugged to her Last Berth to be Broken Up

One of J.M.W. Turner’s most famous paintings involves a well-known warship that was the star of at least one iconic battle for the British Royal Navy in the 18th century. His work is titled The Fighting Temeraire Tugged to her last Berth to be Broken Up, a lackluster, but fitting description of the fate of this once feared vessel that was pivotal to the nation’s fleet of warships.

The painting was done in 1839 and depicts the final moments of the Temeraire as it is slowly tugged out to sea to be dashed and parted out.

The painting is from the Romanticism era and is an interesting contrast between the changing technologies that were happening in maritime shipbuilding and travel during the early 1800’s.

The majestic and once-famous warship, who played a major role at the Battle of Trafalgar, is now being dragged away from port by a lowly, steam-powered tugboat.

It is a sad reminder that a certain sense of elegance and grandeur is often lost in what many deem to be a progressive advance of technology.

2. A First Rate Man-of-War Driven Onto a Reef of Rocks, Floundering in a Gale – George Philip Reinagle

yacht ship painting

The early 1800’s is likely the height of the era of famous ship paintings. One of the most well-known maritime painters was George Philip Reinagle, who was well-known for his ability to capture the essence of the sea’s sometimes tumultuous character that had destroyed so many powerful, strong vessels throughout history.

His 1836 work titled A First Rate Man-of-War Driven Onto a Reef of Rocks, Floundering in a Gale is aptly-named as it features just that—a ship that has been caught in the clutches of the raging sea.

One of the most intriguing aspects of maritime travel was the possibility that sailors could meet a terrifying demise if they were caught in a blustering storm, otherwise known as a gale.

This painting is iconic for Reinagle’s ability to depict the giant, crushing force of the waves along with the sea spray that has been kicked up by the high winds. This work is a grim reminder that not all seafaring travel and adventure ends safely.

Many ocean paintings containing ships will invariably make the ship the main focus, but in Reinagle’s piece it is the power of the ocean waves that dominate.

3. Battle of Trafalgar 1805 – Louis Phillipe Crepin

yacht ship painting

Some of the most famous ship paintings involve intense, deadly battles at sea between powerful naval fleets. Such is the case with Louis Phillipe Crepin’s 1805 work titled Battle of Trafalgar.

This painting depicts one of the most famous naval battles in history that took place in the year noted.

The Battle of Trafalgar featured the mighty British Royal Navy as they were pitted against two other worthy opponents—the Spanish and French naval forces—who had joined forces to try and topple the powerful force that had dominated the waters surrounding Europe and much of the world during this time.

Crepin’s painting portrays, with great accuracy, the close-quarters combat that so often occurred in naval battles.

4. Snow Storm – Steam-Boat off a Harbour’s Mouth   – J.M.W Turner

Snow Storm – Steam- Boat off a Harbours Mouth

As noted above, J.M.W. Turner was among the most famous artists who focused on the life and voyages of sailors and their ships.

Many times, these voyages were undertaken during powerful, unpredictable storms that all-too-often led to the ships capsizing and the entire crews being lost.

Turner’s 1842 work titled Snow Storm – Steam-Boat off a Harbour’s Mouth is one such painting that depicts the sea’s ability to make any vessel, large or small, feel the power of its might from time to time.

Also Read: Famous Lighthouse Paintings

The painting features the steam boat ship caught in a frigid snow storm , the wind sweeping and whipping in every direction as the ship struggles to stay on course and avoid succumbing to the massive waves.

According to many art historians, Turner went to great lengths to accompany various ships’ crews on their journeys so that he could paint his works as accurately as possible.

5. Becalmed off Halfway Rock   – Fitz Hugh Lane

Becalmed off Halfway Rock

So many of the most famous ship paintings ever created feature vessels that are either engaged in raging battles, or caught in powerful gales on the open ocean. However, there are a few notable works that depict the calm, serene nature of the ocean or coastal areas.

Fitz Hugh Lane’s Becalmed off Halfway Rock is one such work that depicts a scene of beauty that few people outside the world of ships and sailing ever get to experience.

This 1860 work depicts ships anchored down next to Halfway Rock, a famous sea marker that is situated approximately halfway between Boston and Cape Ann.

This marker was a popular stop for trading vessels and supply ships as they could join up with other ships and carry out various types of maritime business at a specific location.

Lane’s work features a number of ships anchored down with small row boats working their way from one to another, likely swapping various cargo and other items.

6. Dutch Men-O’-War and Other Shipping in a Calm – Willem van de Velde II

Dutch Men-O'-War and Other Shipping in a Calm - Willem van de Velde II

Willem van de Velde II was a painter who specialized in maritime art during his career in the late 17th century.

This was a time when sailing ships were the height of mankind’s technological achievements and the naval fleets of various nations were the most vital part of any military force.

Velde’s work titled Dutch Men-O’-War and Other Shipping in a Calm was created in 1665 and features the Dutch navy’s vast fleet of ships that include the deadly and feared Men-O’-War vessels.

These ships were known as floating fortresses who possessed the ability to mercilessly pummel opposing ships or coastal forts and cities with impressive precision.

7. The Home Fleet Saluting the State Barge – Jan van de Cappelle

The Home Fleet Saluting the State Barge - Jan van de Cappelle

The mid-1600’s was a time in which maritime travel was responsible for reshaping the people and nations of the world as many pilgrims and travelers ventured to the New World across the Atlantic Ocean.

Jan van de Cappelle captured one instance of significance from this time period in his 1650 work titled The Home Fleet Saluting the State Barge.

The painting depicts a number of different ships gathered together in a port to salute a prominent vessel as it embarked on its voyage.

Cappelle’s work is one of the most well-known ship paintings in history as he masterfully depicts the water’s ability to mirror the happenings above its surface with stunning detail.

8. Argenteuil (Red Boats) – Claude Monet

yacht ship painting

Claude Monet is celebrated as one of the most famous impressionist painters , but most of his work featured scenes from dry land instead of ships and maritime travel. However, his 1875 painting titled Argenteuil (Red Boats) is among one of the most recognized ship paintings ever created.

This work features Monet’s trademarked Impressionist painting style and depicts a calm scene that features contrasting colors that truly highlight the boats in the center of the canvas.

The smooth water appears almost like glass in its ability to reflect the boats and their towering masts.

Monet’s brushstrokes vary greatly when one focuses on the sky above the water and the boats, which are crafted with short, choppy strokes that are able to convey great detail.

9. Nelson’s Inshore Blockading Squadron at Cadiz – Thomas Buttersworth

yacht ship painting

The British Royal Navy was at the peak of its seafaring prowess across much of Europe and the rest of the world during the latter half of the 18th century.

The nation’s powerful fleet engaged in many battles along the coast of Portugal during this time as the two countries were locked in a bout to control the waters around coastal Europe and other parts of the Atlantic.

Thomas Buttersworth painted a work in 1797 that is a testament to a great naval battle for the British forces off the coast of Lisbon. Following the famous Battle of St. Vincent, rear-admiral Nelson and 10 bargemen were engaging in a raid on Spanish gun-boats under the cover of darkness.

The Spanish commander realized his boats were under attack and launched an effort to defend them with 26 of his own men. Despite the British being heavily outnumbered, they managed to kill 18 Spanish sailors and capture the remaining few after a bloody sword fight ensued.

Buttersworth’s painting is a testament to that incident that was a historical victory for the British Navy.

10. Breezing Up (A Fair Wind)   – Winslow Homer

Breezing Up A Fair Wind

One of the most iconic American paintings of all time was done by Winslow Homer, who was another artist that was well-known for his maritime paintings.

His 1876 painting titled Breezing Up (A Fair Wind) features a highly-detailed scene of a small sailboat cruising along on the waves as the sun is at the backs of the men and boys aboard the boat.

In the painting, the boat’s sail is clearly filled with what many would consider to be a ‘fair wind’ as it leans heavily toward the water while the boat’s rudder is steered toward their destination.

The painting is meant to depict a common scene from the late 19th century America as sailing was one of the most popular means of travel around coastal New England at this time.

The work is known for Homer’s masterful use of light and dark, along with the colors and how the sunlight brings out the depth in the varying hues.

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Famous Ship Paintings – Best Nautical Paintings of Ships at Sea

Avatar for Isabella Meyer

Paintings of ships at sea are among the iconic artworks in the world. For centuries, numerous civilizations ruled the world’s waters, sending commercial vessels and ships of war out into the blue horizon; as a result, marine art emerged to depict these adventures and battles. Today, we will celebrate these famous ship paintings and boat paintings by giving them a deeper look. 

Table of Contents

  • 1.1 The Storm on the Sea of Galilee (1633) by Rembrandt
  • 1.2 The Home Fleet Saluting the State Barge (1650) by Jan van de Cappelle
  • 1.3 Nelson’s Inshore Blockading Squadron at Cadiz (1797) by Thomas Buttersworth
  • 1.4 Battle of Trafalgar (1805) by Louis Philippe Crepin
  • 1.5 A First Rate Man-of-War Driven Onto a Reef of Rocks, Floundering in a Gale (1826) by George Philip Reinagle
  • 1.6 The Fighting Temeraire (1839) by J. M. W. Turner
  • 1.7 Becalmed off Halfway Rock (1860) by Fitz Hugh Lane
  • 1.8 Red Boats, Argenteuil (1875) by Claude Monet
  • 1.9 Breezing Up (A Fair Wind) (1876) by Winslow Homer
  • 1.10 Fishing Boats on the Beach at Saintes-Maries (1888) by Vincent van Gogh
  • 2.1 Why Are Paintings of Ships at Sea Such a Popular Topic?
  • 2.2 What Do Famous Ship Paintings Portray?

Our Favorite Famous Ship Paintings

Nautical paintings commemorate the incredible vessels that once sailed the seas, as well as more subdued sailboat paintings. Over time, these vessels became the lifeline of the economies of nations such as the United Kingdom and Portugal, with their sailors carrying and delivering valuable goods of various types. For over a thousand years, ships of diverse kinds and sizes have sailed the oceans.

Part of what inspires the adoration of so many art lovers and aficionados, especially in coastal areas, is the contrast between brilliant man-made ships and the unpredictability and dangers of the ocean and Mother Nature herself.

Many painters have experimented with creating nautical paintings and their legendary sea excursions throughout history, with others specializing entirely in the theme of nautical travel. Here are our favorite paintings of ships at sea.

The Storm on the Sea of Galilee (1633) by Rembrandt

(1606 – 1669)
1633
Oil on canvas
160 x 128
Stolen

This well-known marine artwork was looted in 1990 from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. The boat painting’s whereabouts are still unknown, and it might never be found again. However, there is some debate around the work. It has been the focus of various theft-related investigations ever since it vanished. During the 1630s, just as Rembrandt arrived in Amsterdam to start his professional career, he created what many believe to be his most dramatic works.

This artwork is an example of this period. Rembrandt picked a Bible narrative to demonstrate the seriousness of his creative ambitions.

Rembrandt moved to Amsterdam with the intention of being recognized for his historical artworks and portraits. Using a New Testament narrative, he illustrated how to blend a historical picture with a seascape. This New Testament incident would have been recognizable to Rembrandt’s contemporaries and, more than likely, admired by them. The suspense produced in the picture, on the other hand, would present the narrative with a totally new and surprising interpretation. This example of innovation and risk-taking by Rembrandt, then 27 years old, set him apart from his colleagues and became the foundation of his creative growth.

Paintings of Ships at Sea

The Home Fleet Saluting the State Barge (1650) by Jan van de Cappelle

Jan van de Cappelle (1624 – 1679)
1650
Oil on panel
64 x 92.5
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands

As numerous pilgrims and travelers journeyed to the New World across the Atlantic Ocean in the mid-1600s, seafaring transportation was responsible for shaping the world’s individuals and nations. In his 1650 marine artwork, Jan van de Cappelle caught one significant event from this time period. The picture portrays a variety of ships gathered in a port to honor a major vessel as it set off on its trip.

Cappelle’s artwork is considered among the most famous ship paintings because he captures the water’s capacity to reflect events above its surface in exquisite clarity.

Jan van de Cappelle was a painter of winter landscapes and paintings of ships at sea from the Dutch Golden Age , as well as an entrepreneur and art collector. He is widely regarded as the greatest marine artist of 17th-century Holland.

Boat Painting

Nelson’s Inshore Blockading Squadron at Cadiz (1797) by Thomas Buttersworth

Thomas Buttersworth (1768 – 1842)
1797
Oil painting
63.5 x 99
National Maritime Museum, London

During the second part of the 18th century, the British Royal Navy was at the pinnacle of its nautical power throughout most of Europe and the rest of the world. During this period, the nation’s formidable navy fought in several conflicts off the coast of Portugal as the two countries competed for supremacy of the waterways around coastal Europe and other regions of the Atlantic. In 1797, Thomas Buttersworth produced this picture commemorating a decisive naval fight for British forces off the coastline of Portugal.

Following the historic Battle of St. Vincent, Nelson and ten bargemen were conducting a night attack against Spanish gunboats.

Sailboat Painting

Battle of Trafalgar (1805) by Louis Philippe Crepin

Louis Phillipe Crepin (1772 – 1851)
1805
Oil on canvas
90.93 x 80.78
National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London

A number of the most famous ship paintings depict bloody sea conflicts between formidable naval forces. This is true of Louis Phillipe Crepin’s 1805 work. This picture shows one of the most well-known naval battles, which occurred in the year the artwork was made. The fight faced the formidable British Royal Navy against two other worthy adversaries—the French and Spanish naval forces—who had collaborated to try to overthrow the overwhelming force that had controlled the waterways surrounding Europe and most of the world at the time.

Crepin’s picture depicts the close-quarters warfare that was common in naval conflicts with exceptional precision.

Famous Boat Painting

A First Rate Man-of-War Driven Onto a Reef of Rocks, Floundering in a Gale (1826) by George Philip Reinagle

George Philip Reinagle (1802 – 1835)
1826
Oil on canvas
102 x 127.2
Royal Albert Memorial Museum, Exeter

The early 1800s were most likely the peak of the legendary ship painting era. George Philip Reinagle was a well-known marine artist noted for his ability to portray the character of the sea’s often violent nature that has wrecked so many big, strong ships throughout history.

His 1826 masterpiece is adequately titled since it depicts a ship caught in the grasp of the surging sea.

One of the most exciting features of maritime travel was the risk that mariners may perish if caught in a raging storm, sometimes known as a gale. This work is famous for Reinagle’s ability to capture the massive, crushing power of the waves, as well as the sea spray whipped up by the fierce winds. This piece serves as a sobering reminder that not all marine exploration and adventure are safe.

Marine Art

The Fighting Temeraire (1839) by J. M. W. Turner

J. M. W. Turner (1775 – 1851)
1839
Oil paint
90.7 x 121.6
National Gallery, London

The early industrial revolution is suggested by the marine artwork’s surroundings. Even though the sky is illuminated, a tugboat is rushing to assist. The tugboat stands for the new era of steam, coal, and fire. Turner’s own emotions and imagination are revealed in the image, which is intriguing and romantic. Although it is difficult to determine the painting’s message, it is unquestionably an important symbol of its time.

Turner’s boat painting features opposing hues that give it a magical or ethereal appearance. In contrast to the gloomy sky, the tugboat pops out.

A little portion of the painting’s bottom is taken up by the water, striking a balance between the sky and water. The Fighting Temeraire , while not well-liked in its day, has grown in popularity over time. A significant character in British art history, John Ruskin, spoke favorably of the piece. Although the artwork was eventually taken off the auction board, many reviewers, including Turner himself, praised it as a masterpiece. Nevertheless, Turner kept promoting his work despite the numerous unfavorable reviews.

Famous Paintings of Ships at Sea

Becalmed off Halfway Rock (1860) by Fitz Hugh Lane

Fitz Hugh Lane (1804 – 1865)
1860
Oil on canvas
70.4 x 120.5
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

Several of the most famous ship paintings ever made depict warships engaged in furious conflicts or stuck in tremendous gales on the wide sea. There are, though, a few significant nautical paintings that reflect the placid, quiet character of the ocean or coastal regions. This piece portrays ships tied around Halfway Rock, a prominent maritime landmark located roughly halfway between Cape Ann and Boston.

This place was a popular stopping point for commercial vessels and supply ships since it allowed them to connect with other ships and conduct many forms of maritime commerce at a precise spot.

Famous Marine Art

Red Boats, Argenteuil (1875) by Claude Monet

Claude Monet (1840 – 1926)
1875
Oil painting
61.8 x 82.5
Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France

Monet depicted the town and outlying areas of Argenteuil during the 1870s, creating images of harmony and beauty that were sometimes at odds with the realities of the time. Despite his belief in en Plein air painting , Monet painstakingly selected the components he wanted to incorporate and often completed his works in the studio.

His works include no hints of the contamination of the river at Argenteuil or the chaos of a community pushing all into its industry.

Monet created the composition in this painting by using boats, particularly the verticals of the masts. Again, he used contrasting colors in the form of oranges, blues, greens, and reds. The painting is vibrant with color, and the blues and purples depict the depth of the sea.

Famous Nautical Paintings

Breezing Up (A Fair Wind) (1876) by Winslow Homer

Winslow Homer (1836 – 1910)
1876
Oil on canvas
61.5 x 97
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

After visiting Massachusetts, where he first painted in watercolor, Homer started this painting in New York in 1873. He utilized the sketches he made there to create an oil painting that he worked on for three years. Infrared reflectography has shown the several composition modifications he made during this period, including the erasure of a fourth youngster near the mast and a second ship in the distance.

The artwork’s theme is upbeat; despite the turbulent seas, the boaters appear to be at ease. The anchor that substituted the person in the bow was said to represent hope.

The youngster at the helm looks to the horizon, an expression of hope for his and the nascent United States’ future. The final piece demonstrates that Homer was influenced by the substantial impact of Japanese art on Western artists in the 19th century, notably in the compositional balance between the dynamic and sparse parts. In 1866, Homer visited France, and the influence of French artists Claude Monet and Gustave Courbet’s nautical paintings is also visible.

Nautical Paintings

Fishing Boats on the Beach at Saintes-Maries (1888) by Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh (1853 – 1890)
1888
Oil on canvas
39.5 x 53.3
Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

This sailboat painting is a reworking of the artist’s drawing and is one of his most impressive attempts at establishing balance and harmony. The fishing boats stand in sharp contrast to his condition, serving as a source of optimism for the painter as he neared the end of his life. Vincent van Gogh applied his colors with a palette knife, and the contrasting blue and white portions of the water are filled with greens and blues to form the waves. He also produced the boats with a reed pen and added the white and blue colors with big scribbles.

As a result, the picture has a flowing movement and a blend of Impressionist and Realism elements.

Famous Sailboat Painting

Warship and sailboat paintings have always been popular subjects. This is likely due to the fact that ships have played such an important role in the development of civilization. Thanks to artists who are fascinated with these incredible vessels, we have many famous ship paintings to admire nowadays.

Take a look at our ship paintings webstory here!

Frequently Asked Questions

Why are paintings of ships at sea such a popular topic.

Ships have played an essential role in the past for humans, helping us explore new lands and peoples. Perhaps it is this sense of adventure and free spirit that artists personally resonate with. Or perhaps creating nautical paintings provides them with the chance to portray both nature and man-man creations.

What Do Famous Ship Paintings Portray?

Some artists depict intense battle scenes from human history. Others prefer to create sailboat paintings that have a more subdued and peaceful atmosphere. Other times, the artwork can have a biblical or mythological tale attached to it. Paintings of ships at sea are not only numerous but diverse in their themes and styles.

isabella meyer

Isabella studied at the University of Cape Town in South Africa and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts majoring in English Literature & Language and Psychology. Throughout her undergraduate years, she took Art History as an additional subject and absolutely loved it. Building on from her art history knowledge that began in high school, art has always been a particular area of fascination for her. From learning about artworks previously unknown to her, or sharpening her existing understanding of specific works, the ability to continue learning within this interesting sphere excites her greatly.

Her focal points of interest in art history encompass profiling specific artists and art movements, as it is these areas where she is able to really dig deep into the rich narrative of the art world. Additionally, she particularly enjoys exploring the different artistic styles of the 20 th century, as well as the important impact that female artists have had on the development of art history.

Learn more about Isabella Meyer and the Art in Context Team .

Cite this Article

Isabella, Meyer, “Famous Ship Paintings – Best Nautical Paintings of Ships at Sea.” Art in Context. November 23, 2022. URL: https://artincontext.org/famous-ship-paintings/

Meyer, I. (2022, 23 November). Famous Ship Paintings – Best Nautical Paintings of Ships at Sea. Art in Context. https://artincontext.org/famous-ship-paintings/

Meyer, Isabella. “Famous Ship Paintings – Best Nautical Paintings of Ships at Sea.” Art in Context , November 23, 2022. https://artincontext.org/famous-ship-paintings/ .

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The Most Famous Artists and Artworks

Discover the most famous artists, paintings, sculptors…in all of history! 

yacht ship painting

MOST FAMOUS ARTISTS AND ARTWORKS

Discover the most famous artists, paintings, sculptors!

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Marine Insight

10 Famous Ship Paintings In The World

Marine Art or ship paintings are a broad niche in the world of painting and sculpture. Many themes, ideas, emotions and periods are beautifully portrayed in such paintings, depicting ships engaged in battle, merchant vessels gliding over the horizon, exploration vessels of the bygone times, ships of powerful generals and pirates and so on.

Most of the world’s famous ship paintings date back to the Age of Exploration and the Age of Conquest, from the 16th to the 18th centuries. These were the times when rapid advancements in maritime technology brought about a revolution in shipping. Many new maritime vessels were being constructed to fulfil the needs of powerful naval states like Portugal, Spain and later the British Empire.

Ships of this era played a vital role in propelling these mercantilist economies and allowed trade between the European continent, the Americas and South East Asia. That may be why ship paintings intrigue art lovers and history enthusiasts alike.

In this article, let us look at the world’s ten famous ship paintings.

Table of Contents

1. The Fighting Temeraire Tugged to her last Berth to be Broken Up (1838)

One of the most renowned paintings by the English painter and artist Joseph Mallord William Turner, it depicts the last voyage of the Admiralty’s premier vessel 90-gun HMS Temeraire as it was being taken from the Thames River to Rotherhithe in London for being scrapped. 

The  1838 oil-on-canvas painting received great attention from art lovers and audiences for its symbolism and vivid play of colours. Painted in the era of Romanticism, it also portrayed the coming of the age of steamships.

The veteran vessel was once dreaded by the enemy states and played a pivotal role in the 1805 Battle of Trafalgar, fought between the British Royal Navy and the combined fleets of the Spanish and French Navies.

The Fighting Temeraire Tugged to her last Berth to be Broken Up

However, by 1838 the warship was more than 40 years old and was sold off to a private company, evident in the painting, as the ship carries a white flag instead of the union flag. The Royal Academy exhibited it in 1839, along with a line adapted by Turner from Thomas Campbell’s poem. It said, ‘Ye Mariners of England: The Flag which brave the battle and the breeze, No longer owns her’.

There is a disagreement among people regarding whether Turner saw it being tugged or recreated the scene from his imagination. Nonetheless, he has aptly portrayed the glorious old warship, once the pride of the British Naval fleet.

In 2020, it was printed on the new £20 banknote, while the original can be admired in the National Gallery of London.

2. The Storm on the Sea of Galilee

The 1633 oil painting by Dutch Baroque artist Rembrandt Van Rijn is one of the greatest art thefts in the world. The serene work depicts the biblical event of Jesus calming the storm on this sea, as described in the holy book. It is the painter’s only seascape painting. However, it was stolen in 1990 from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. 

The painting remains missing, and the mystery behind its theft remains unsolved. However, it has been in the news quite a few times.

The Storm on the Sea of Galilee

It shows Jesus sitting peacefully while his disciples are trying to remain composed in the face of a heavy storm that has engulfed their boat. While they are tense, they try to hide their concerns and solely rely on Jesus to help them face the crisis. 

While the painting is not very exciting or dramatic, it gives a spiritual feel to many. The emotions and feelings of the disciples have been beautifully portrayed by Rembrandt.

3. A First Rate Man-of-War Driven Onto a Reef of Rocks, Floundering in a Gale

The eighteenth century was the era of ship paintings, usually commissioned by wealthy patrons like Merchants apart from Royals. However, sometimes the artists also depicted some famous ships in their artworks. One such masterpiece was painted by George Philip Reinagle, known for his mesmerising sea paintings. 

Unlike other artists, who focussed on the vessel, he highlighted the ever-changing character of the seas, the power and the might of waves that tore apart many famous ships.

His 1836 painting is true to its name as it shows a vessel caught in the clutches of a raging and tumultuous sea.

A First Rate Man-of-War Driven Onto a Reef of Rocks, Floundering in a Gale

It also highlights one of the most dangerous aspects of marine travel: the possibility of death if the seamen were caught in a terrible storm, also called a gale.

This work is iconic as it depicts an almost realistic scene as if it were happening in front of one’s eyes. It also lets one imagine how many lives must have been taken by the high seas during those times.

4. Becalmed off Halfway Rock

Most ship paintings depict vessels engaged in naval wars or caught between the powerful waves on the high seas. However, very few portray the calm and serene nature of the seas.

One such work is the 1860 painting by Fitz Hugh Lane that beautifully captures a scene that people outside of the maritime world can never experience. It portrays a vessel close to Halfway Rock, a popular marker between Boston and Cape Ann.

Becalmed off Halfway Rock

It was a famous halting point for merchant vessels and supply ships. They could catch up with other boats and also promote their business at this point, while it also allowed the sailors to relax and rejuvenate themselves on land.

The painting shows two big ships anchored and three boats moving from one point to another as if dealing with cargo items being carried in the big ships. This painting is currently in the National Gallery, Washington.

5. Breezing Up 

A Fair Wind/Breezing Up, painted by Winslow Homer between 1873-76, shows a catboat with three young lads and a man. It is one of the most iconic paintings in the US. It has excellent symbolism and portrays harsh waves, yet the people on the boat look calm and in control of the situation.

Hence, a certain kind of optimism is evident in the work, and though it is not a large painting, it truly reflects the spirit of American life in those days. The anchor in the bow of the vessel is interpreted as symbolising hope for the bright future of the newly formed United States.

Breezing Up 

The painting portrays the growing influence of Japanese styles of art on European painters in the 19th century. Homer had been to France to get inspiration for his paintings from his contemporaries like Gustave Courbet and Claude Monet. The painting was completed in 1876 and showcased many influences of the time.

6. The Home Fleet Saluting The State Barge

Jan Van de Cappelle was one of the most famous painters who aptly captured the essence of marine travel and the vivid emotions associated with it in his works. He did not paint harsh seas or cloudless skies but showed vessels and clouds over the horizon.

In the 16th and 17th centuries, marine travel or seafaring gained prominence, and many seemed to make great fortunes through it. It also modelled communities and newly emerging nation-states. Also, many cultural exchanges between people and diverse religious and ethnic groups were made possible by sea voyages of exploration. 

The Home Fleet Saluting The State Barge

Dutch painter Cappelle was known for his seascapes or river views with many ships in sight. In this particular work, we can see a row of vessels anchored while two yachts fire a salute for the sailors or officials sailing by in a state-owned barge. The water is calm and almost crystal-clear as it reflects the passengers’ and the vessel’s image. 

The 1650 painting depicting some ships anchored in port, saluting a vessel going on its voyage, depicts how popular sea travel had become, for many reasons, in this case for the Dutch Empire.

7. Seascape in the Morning

The painting was executed by Simon de Vlieger sometime around 1640-45. Born in Rotterdam in 1601, Vlieger’s ‘Seascape in the morning’ tells the story of deliverance after travail. The artist portrays this through the hues of the sky.

On the right of the painting, the sky is dark, and one can see a sailor or seaman on a damaged boat. A fire can be seen, a boat rowing to the shore and some vessels are waiting in the distance. A figure of a man is standing; whether for thanksgiving or deliverance, that is unknown.

Seascape in the Morning

In the middle is a large ship heading towards the horizon and other vessels seem like ghostly apparitions the closer they get to the horizon.

The horizon is portrayed as kind, evident from the white light that comes down from the clouds. It is morning, and it seems the ships have survived a tumultuous sea at night and survived.

Many look at it with great optimism, as if it were a religious painting. It beautifully portrays human sufferings in this world, trials and tribulations and the hope for heaven.

8. Dutch Men-O’-War and Other Shipping in a Calm

Willem van de Velde II was a Dutch painter admired for his marine paintings, executed in the 17th century. It was a time when vessels marked the height of humankind’s technological breakthroughs, and naval fleets were an intrinsic part of a nation’s military prowess. 

His ‘Dutch Men-O’-War and Other Shipping in a Calm’ was painted in 1665 and portrayed the Dutch navy’s enormous fleet of naval ships, including the much feared and dreaded Men-O’-war vessels. 

They were known as floating fortresses laden with weapons and could overtake enemy ships, coastal forts, settlements, and cities in no time.

Dutch Men-O’-War and Other Shipping in a Calm

The painting shows many of these ships, laden with captains and crews, portraying the naval power of the Dutch.

Although the term ‘Men-O-War never acquired a specific meaning, it was used for a vessel with cannons and usually sails, as opposed to a galley with oars.

9. The Slave Ship

One of J.M.W Turner’s most recognised and acclaimed works, ‘The Slave Ship’ is a beautiful yet deeply saddening work depicting the harsh realities of the time. At a glance, the painting seems ordinary, showing a seafaring ship caught in a storm. Its thin masts indicate that the vessel could sink at any time, while the red and black used for the sky convey the sense of foreboding and demise.

It is an unfortunate vessel, and the scene depicted in the painting is hear-wrenching. One of the slave men has a manacled ankle, and looking at the work, one can gauge that the victims onboard the vessels are slaves trapped in a sinking ship. While the scene is blurred, Turner uses strong and bright colours and sharp brushstrokes to portray the feelings behind the painting.

The Slave Ship

Such happenings were not uncommon. During those times, ships sailing with slaves were sometimes deliberately sunk in case disease spread among the slaves. While it is cruelty at its peak, such incidents reflected the norms of those times.

Turner took inspiration from events like the Zhong Massacre, wherein the crew of the slave ship threw 54 female slaves and several children from the portholes, along with many protestors.

10. Fishing Boats on the Beach at Saints-Maries

The enchanting ‘Fishing Boats on the Beach at Saints-Maries’ is one of the many paintings made by Van Gogh in 1888, when he travelled to Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer on the Mediterranean Sea. During those times, Saintes-Maries was a fishing village inhabited by less than 100 families.

He used a reed pen to make the boats, and his strokes and technique highlight the influence of Japanese prints on him. The seaside scene captures the everyday life of the people living in the region, and the painting depicts harmony and balance. Although he was ill, the seascapes painted by him were like a ray of hope to enjoy the things he loved before he passed away.

Fishing Boats on the Beach at Saints-Maries

He made use of a palette knife to apply colours. The white and blue regions of the sea are superimposed with green and blue to make waves. This gives it a realistic look and makes it look surreal and charming. 

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About Author

Zahra is an alumna of Miranda House, University of Delhi. She is an avid writer, possessing immaculate research and editing skills. Author of several academic papers, she has also worked as a freelance writer, producing many technical, creative and marketing pieces. A true aesthete at heart, she loves books a little more than anything else.

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  • History's Greatest Paintings, Period
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List of Famous Marine Art Paintings

Reference

List of the most famous marine art paintings in the world, ranked by user votes with pictures of the art when available. The popular marine art paintings on this list are considered to be some of the most recognizable works of art on the planet, so save yourself a trip to the museum and check out this artwork from the comfort of your own home. marine art is an extremely important genre in the art world, so it's no surprise that some of the most recognizable fall under the marine art genre. You can find additional information about these well-known paintings by clicking on the names of the pieces.

Everything from Breezing Up to Impression, Sunrise is included on this poll.

This list answers the questions, "What are examples of marine art paintings?" and "What are the most famous marine art paintings?"

The Ninth Wave

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The Ninth Wave

Breezing Up

Breezing Up

The Battle of Chesma

The Battle of Chesma

Ships on a Stormy Sea

Ships on a Stormy Sea

The Landing at SubashI

The Landing at SubashI

The Embarkation of the Queen of Sheba

The Embarkation of the Queen of Sheba

Lumber Schooners at Evening on Penobscot Bay

Lumber Schooners at Evening on Penobscot Bay

The Fighting Temeraire

The Fighting Temeraire

Watson and the Shark (1782)

Watson and the Shark (1782)

The Disembarkation of Cleopatra at Tarsus

The Disembarkation of Cleopatra at Tarsus

Nightfall on the Thames

Nightfall on the Thames

The Grand Canal, Venice

The Grand Canal, Venice

The Maas at Dordrecht

The Maas at Dordrecht

Children on the Seashore

Children on the Seashore

The View of Valkhof at Nijmegen

The View of Valkhof at Nijmegen

The Gulf Stream

The Gulf Stream

The Life Line

The Life Line

The Slave Ship

The Slave Ship

Shipping on the Clyde

Shipping on the Clyde

The Blue Boat

The Blue Boat

The 'Gouden Leeuw' on the IJ at Amsterdam

The 'Gouden Leeuw' on the IJ at Amsterdam

Return of the Bucintoro to the Molo on Ascension Day

Return of the Bucintoro to the Molo on Ascension Day

Seascape in the Morning

Seascape in the Morning

View of Venice

View of Venice

Ships Tossed in a Gale

Ships Tossed in a Gale

The Departure of Steam Folkestone

The Departure of Steam Folkestone

Bridge at Villeneuve-la-Garenne

Bridge at Villeneuve-la-Garenne

Grand Canal, Venice

Grand Canal, Venice

The Battle of Livorno

The Battle of Livorno

Ships Running Aground in a Storm

Ships Running Aground in a Storm

Ship Starlight

Ship Starlight

The Trojan Women Setting Fire to their Fleet

The Trojan Women Setting Fire to their Fleet

View of Venice: Ducal Palace, Dogana, and San Giorgio

View of Venice: Ducal Palace, Dogana, and San Giorgio

View of Hoorn

View of Hoorn

The Grand Canal and the Church of the Salute

The Grand Canal and the Church of the Salute

A Calm

Max Schmitt in a Single Scull

Nødhavn Ved Norskekysten

Nødhavn Ved Norskekysten

Flood at Port-Marly

Flood at Port-Marly

Battle of Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864

Battle of Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864

The Kearsarge and the Alabama

The Kearsarge and the Alabama

Venice from the Porch of Madonna della Salute

Venice from the Porch of Madonna della Salute

Fishing Boats with Hucksters Bargaining for Fish

Fishing Boats with Hucksters Bargaining for Fish

The Icebergs

The Icebergs

Brace's Rock, Eastern Point, Gloucester

Brace's Rock, Eastern Point, Gloucester

View in Venice - The Grand Canal

View in Venice - The Grand Canal

Sur la Plage

Sur la Plage

Battle of the U.S.S. Kearsarge and the C.S.S. Alabama

Battle of the U.S.S. Kearsarge and the C.S.S. Alabama

The Departure of a Dignitary from Middelburg

The Departure of a Dignitary from Middelburg

The Waves

The Red Buoy

Symphony in Grey and Green: The Ocean

Symphony in Grey and Green: The Ocean

Battle of Vigo Bay

Battle of Vigo Bay

The Kearsarge at Boulogne

The Kearsarge at Boulogne

Setting Sun. Sardine Fishing. Adagio. Opus 221 from the series The Sea, The Boats, Concarneau

Setting Sun. Sardine Fishing. Adagio. Opus 221 from the series The Sea, The Boats, Concarneau

The Raft of the Medusa

The Raft of the Medusa

Vessels in a Strong Wind

Vessels in a Strong Wind

Fishing for Souls

Fishing for Souls

Impression, Sunrise

Impression, Sunrise

Grey and Silver: Old Battersea Reach

Grey and Silver: Old Battersea Reach

“Don’t think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it’s good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol

History's Greatest Paintings, Period

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8 Most Famous Ship Paintings by Famous Artists

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The best ship paintings are not necessarily the most well-known, but many have a special place in history. From the late 17th century to the present day, the world is awash with masterpieces depicting seafaring vessels. Below is a list of 8 most famous ship paintings:

The Fighting Temeraire by J. M. W. Turner

The setting of the painting suggests the early industrial revolution. The sky is full of light, yet a tugboat is coming in for the rescue. The tugboat represents the new age of steam, fire, and coal. The image is evocative and romantic, revealing Turner's own personal feelings and imagination. The painting's meaning is difficult to pinpoint, but it is certainly a significant representation of this age.

The contrasting colors in Turner's painting give the ship a mythical or ethereal look. The tugboat stands out against the moody sky. The sea occupies a small area near the bottom of the painting, creating a balance between the two. While large areas of silence are essential in a painting, small areas of “noise” are equally important to the story.

Though viewed negatively in its day, The Fighting Temeraire has gained wider recognition over the years. John Ruskin, a great figure in British art history, wrote positively about the work. The painting was later removed from the auction block, but it was considered a masterpiece by many critics, including Turner himself. However, Turner did continue to support his work, despite the widespread negative reviews.

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Breezing Up by Winslow Home

Breezing Up (A Fair Wind) is a famous painting by American painter Winslow Homer. Painted between 1873 and 1876, this piece depicts a Gloucester, Massachusetts harbor and three young boys and a man on a catboat. This painting is considered one of the most famous and iconic works of art in the United States.

Although “Breezing Up” isn't a very large painting, it reflects the spirit of American life. The National Academy of Design and Centennial International Exhibition both deemed Breezing Up to be one of the most popular works by American artists. In fact, this painting has remained so popular that it has been shortened to “Breeze Up” today.

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The Slave Ship by J. M. W. Turner

“The Slave Ship” by J. M. W. Turner depicts a seafaring vessel in a stormy sky. The small vessel's thin masts reinforce this fragile image, while the mist and waves obscure its form. The colors of the sky and the ocean indicate the mood and atmosphere Turner aims to establish. Red and black in the sea and the ocean floor convey a sense of violent turbulence and foreboding.

The Slave Ship is a painting of an ill-fated slave ship. The scene depicted in this painting is horrific. Notice the manacled ankle of one of the slave men. When the full title of the painting is read, it becomes clear that the victims were slaves aboard a ship that was sinking. While the scene seems bleak, Turner manages to make the scene seem eerie by using strong colors and sharp brushstrokes.

Turner draws his inspiration from real life events, such as the Zong Massacre. In 1781, a British slave ship named the Zong was loaded with dozens of slaves. The crew, acting on age-old sea law, forced 54 female and child slaves through the portholes and threw the rest overboard, including several protesters.

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The Battle of Trafalgar by J. M. W. Turner

The Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805, by JMW Turner is a powerful painting depicting the naval battle that changed the course of the Napoleonic Wars and established British naval supremacy. While Turner did not have the exact details of the battle, he carefully crafted his depiction to depict the most important moments of the naval battle. The painting is one of Turner's best known works and it is widely regarded as a masterpiece.

Turner's painting was completed twenty years after the battle, which makes it more allegorical than historically accurate. The painting is brilliant and striking and showcases his mastery of the nautical scene, which he would return to time and again throughout his life. This is not to say that Turner's painting was not historically accurate, but it still demonstrates his mastery of the genre.

yacht ship painting

The Storm on the Sea of Galilee by Rembrandt

The Storm on the Sea of Galilee is a 1633 oil on canvas painting by Rembrandt van Rijn. It was stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1990. The painting's fate remains a mystery, and it may never be recovered. The art, however, is not without controversy. Since its disappearance, it has been the subject of numerous theft-related investigations.

The scene in The Storm on the Sea of Galilee is one of Rembrandt's most famous paintings. It shows people in a storm, but they are not panicked, as they would be if they were not facing the storm. Even Jesus, who is usually depicted smiling, is peacefully resting on the shore, despite the storm. While most people are concerned about the safety of the boat and the life of those in it, they can take solace in the fact that Christ is with them.

While the scene is not as exciting as the scene in Rubens's The Storm on the Sea of Galilee, the dramatic tilt of the boat and the shivering disciples give it an intensely spiritual feel. While there are many things that might have been arousing in the scene, Rembrandt was clearly trying to convey the mood and emotions of the time. He also used the diagonal composition in The Rising of the Cross and The Storm on the Sea of Galilee to emphasize the motion.

yacht ship painting

Fishing Boats on the Beach at Saintes-Maries

The beautiful painting, Fishing Boats on the Beach at Saints-Maries, by Van Gogh, was painted in 1888. This seaside scene is a reworking of a sketch by the artist, and it is one of his most accomplished attempts at achieving harmony and balance. The seascapes and fishing boats stand in stark contrast to his illness, and they stand as a beacon of hope for the artist at the end of his life.

Van Gogh used a palette knife to apply his colors, and the contrasting white and blue areas of the sea are filled with blue and green to create the waves. He also used a reed pen to sketch out the boats, and applied the blue and white colors with thick scribbles. The result is a painting with fluid movement and a mixture of impressionists and realists.

yacht ship painting

The Home Fleet Saluting the State Barge

The Home Fleet Saluting the State Barge was painted by Jan van de Cappelle in 1650. This Dutch painter had been a prominent figure in the world of art. He was born in Amsterdam, North Holland, in 1626 and died in 1679. The painting is an excellent example of Dutch Renaissance art . You can learn more about it by visiting the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. This masterpiece shows the Dutch way of life.

yacht ship painting

Argenteuil by Claude Monet

This painting of Argenteuil, France depicts a quaint bridge with a steam train in the background and long green grass and trees. The composition is one of Monet's works in the impressionist style, where light and shadow are central elements. The painting is one of a series he created depicting the bridges of Argenteuil. In addition, this painting has an important message: Monet's art is meant to be a tribute to nature.

The boat basin in Argenteuil was a popular place to view sailing regattas on the Seine. Aside from this scene, Monet painted a portrait of his wife, Mrs. Monet, whose portrait hangs in his home in the city. This painting displays the artist's mastery of water painting and the subject of leisurely figures. Claude Monet's water painting technique is also evident in his paintings of the Regatta at Argenteuil, which depicts a traditional French sailing race.

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Ship paintings are perfect for modern homes . If you are interested in above famous ship paintings, why not get a museum quality oil painting reproduction ?

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Sebastian Watkins

About the Author: Sebastian Watkins

Maritime Art and History

PEM’s wide-ranging maritime collection conveys the far-reaching cultural, symbolic and emotional impact of the sea.

Maritime Art and History

The sea holds universal allure as a muse for artistic and cultural expression.

Emphasizing physical fortitude, technical challenges, adventure, commercial adroitness and exposure to other cultures, works in PEM’s maritime collection employ diverse forms of expression to convey the far-reaching cultural, symbolic and emotional impact of the sea.

PEM was founded in 1799 in part to collect ship’s logs, navigational instruments and sea charts that mariners could consult to increase safety at sea for all. The collection rapidly expanded to include ship models, paintings and prints that chronicled notable experiences of trade, exploration and cross-cultural interaction. During long ocean voyages, crew members created decorated boxes, whimsies in bottles, nautical carvings and scrimshaw. These works capture the distinctive creative spirit and emotional impulses generated by seafaring experiences. From this perceptive selection of extraordinary objects arose the first and most comprehensive maritime collection in the United States.

PEM’s maritime holdings reflect the legacy of many generous donors, some of whom contributed substantial collections to help the museum tell a wider range of stories of interaction with the sea around the globe and through time. These collections focus on Pacific exploration and discovery, sea charts, whaling paintings and prints, steamship and ocean liner paintings, posters and ephemera, ship portraits by American and European artists and New England fishing scenes.

PEM strives to embrace a global perspective on the maritime experience through historical and contemporary works that express the universal significance and symbolism of the sea.

Highlights from this collection

Two-headed equestrian figurehead, about 1750

Two-headed equestrian figurehead, about 1750

Artist in the United Kingdom

On view in the Byrne Family Gallery of Maritime Art.

Ship Southern Cross in Boston Harbor, 1851

Ship Southern Cross in Boston Harbor, 1851

Fitz Henry Lane (1804–1865, United States)

Royal presentation octant dedicated to King Louis XVI, about 1786.

Royal presentation octant dedicated to King Louis XVI, about 1786

Jean Baptiste Magnié (mid 18th-century, France)

Model of the ship Queen Elizabeth, 1947–48

Model of the ship Queen Elizabeth , 1947–48

Bassett-Lowke Ltd (Northampton, United Kingdom)

They Took Their Wives with Them on Their Cruises, about 1938

They Took Their Wives with Them on Their Cruises , about 1938

N. C. Wyeth (1882–1945, United States)

Scrimshaw of the ship Susan, 1829

Scrimshaw of the ship Susan , 1829

Frederick Myrick (1808–1862, United States)

Model of the ship Friendship, about 1804

Model of the ship Friendship , about 1804

Thomas Russell and Mr. Odell (active 19th century, United States)

Captain Cook Cast a Way on Cape Cod, 1802

Captain Cook Cast a Way on Cape Cod, 1802

Michele Felice Cornè (1752–1845, Italian, American)

Ship Alfred of Salem Cap Joseph Felt, 1806

Ship Alfred of Salem Cap Joseph Felt, 1806

Nicolas Cammillieri (1773–1860, France)

Figurehead, about 1805

Figurehead, about 1805

Attributed to William Rush (1756–1833, United States)

Icebound Ship, about 1880

Icebound Ship, about 1880

William Bradford (1823–1892, United States)

Portrait of Nathaniel Bowditch, 1835

Portrait of Nathaniel Bowditch , 1835

Charles Osgood (1809–1890, United States)

Launching of the Ship Fame, 1802

Launching of the Ship Fame, 1802

George Ropes (1788–1819, United States)

The Stranding of Corvettes in the Mauvais Canal, Strait of Torres (L’échouage des corvettes dans le canal Mauvais, détroit de Torrès), 1843

The Stranding of Corvettes in the Mauvais Canal, Strait of Torres (L’échouage des corvettes dans le canal Mauvais, détroit de Torrès) , 1843

Louis Le Breton (1818–1886, France)

Artist in the United Kingdom, Two-headed equestrian figurehead, about 1750 (detail). White pine. Museum purchase, made possible by Ulf B. and Elizabeth C. Heide. 2018.12.1.

Fitz Henry Lane (1804–1865, United States), Ship Southern Cross i n Boston Harbor, 1851. Oil on canvas. Gift of the estate of Stephen Wheatland, 1987. M18639.

Jean Baptiste Magnié (mid-18th century, France), Royal presentation octant dedicated to King Louis XVI, about 1786. Brass, mahogany, and glass. Gift of Strafford Morss, 1966. M10975.

Bassett-Lowke Ltd (Northampton, United Kingdom), Model of the ship Queen Elizabeth, 1947–48 (detail). White mahogany, gunmetal and brass. Gift of Cunard Line Ltd., 1970. M14220.

N. C. Wyeth (1882–1945, United States), They Took Their Wives with Them on Their Cruises, about 1938. Oil on board. Museum purchase, made possible by Nancy and George Putnam, 2007. M27834. Photo by Dennis Helmar.

Frederick Myrick (1808–1862, United States), Scrimshaw of the ship Susan , 1829. Whale tooth. Gift of George Peirce, 1830. M13.

Thomas Russell and Mr. Odell (active 19th century, United States), Model of the ship Friendship , about 1804. Wood, cordage and bronze. Gift of Captain William Story, about 1804. M48.

Michele Felice Cornè (1752–1845, Italian, American), Captain Cook Cast a Way on Cape Cod , 1802. Gouache on paper. Gift of Augustus Peabody Loring Jr., 1946. M5923. Photo by Mark Sexton.

Nicolas Cammillieri (1773–1860, France), Ship Alfred of Salem Cap Joseph Felt, 1806. Watercolor on paper. Gift of Marion H. Lieb, Elizabeth M. Ringquist, and Grace F. Agge, 1956. M8900. Photo by Mark Sexton.

Attributed to William Rush (1756–1833, United States), Figurehead, about 1805. Pine and paint. Museum purchase, made possible by the Maritime Visiting Committee, Levin H. Campbell Jr., and an anonymous donor. M27741.

William Bradford (1823–1892, United States), Icebound Ship, about 1880. Oil on canvas. Museum purchase with funds donated anonymously, 1996. M27190.

Charles Osgood (1809–1890, United States), Portrait of Nathaniel Bowditch , 1835. Oil on canvas. Commissioned by the East India Marine Society, 1835. M370. Photo by Mark Sexton.

George Ropes (1788–1819, United States), Launching of the Ship Fame, 1802. Oil on canvas. Gift of Nathaniel Silsbee, 1862. 108332.

Louis Le Breton (1818–1886, France), The Stranding of Corvettes in the Mauvais Canal, Strait of Torres (L’échouage des corvettes dans le canal Mauvais, détroit de Torrès) , 1843. Oil on canvas. Museum purchase, made possible by the Fellows and Friends Fund, 1961. M10920.

Loans and acquisitions

Loans and acquisitions

PEM is committed to providing the broadest possible access to its collection through the loan of objects for educational and scholarly purposes. Learn how to request a loan from the museum’s collection.

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History of a Painting: 'Barge Haulers at Volga' by Ilya Repin

Barge Haulers on the Volga by Ilya Repin (1872-1873)

Barge Haulers at Volga by Ilya Repin is one of the most controversial, yet iconic paintings in Russian art history. Depicting the hard labour that barge haulers suffered, the painting is highly emotional, showing all the different characteristics and personalities of the people that were made to do such work, as well as expressing a social critic towards the phenomenon. We wanted to learn more about this incredible artwork, so we took a closer look.

Repin’s Barge Haulers at Volga is one of his early paintings; the artist was still studying at the Fine Art Academy after he completed it. At that time, Repin mostly worked on religious paintings based on Biblical passages, so his sudden shift to realism was unexpected.

In the 1860s, as a part of his plain air preparatory work for a painting about Iov, Repin took a short trip to Ust-Izhora, a small town near St Petersburg. Soon the artist noticed a group of barge haulers at work. The contrast of poor, hard-working people breaking their backs against the flourishing and rich upper class made a strong impact on Repin. Right away he created the first watercolor draft of the painting. The composition of this first draft was too vague and didn’t express well all the emotions that Repin wanted to show, so the artist took a trip to the Volga river to learn more about the lives of barge haulers. There he continued working on each character and the composition of the future masterpiece.

Barge Haulers on the Volga by Ilya Repin (1872-1873)

Repin stayed in the town of Samara , located on the Volga river, for the whole summer, getting acquainted with the everyday life of barge haulers, speaking with them and getting to know them. One person Repin became familiar with was barge hauler Kanin, who used to be a monk, but left the monastery. Kanin is one of the central figures in the painting.

The composition of the painting was created in such a way that the viewer feels like the group of barge haulers is moving towards the frame of the painting, as if they are trying to step outside of the canvas. Each barge hauler has a different expression based on the real life impressions Repin gathered during the months he spent on the Volga. On the far right of the painting we see a ship, which is Repin’s symbol of progress that would eventually replace barge haulers with machines. The painting in its entirety was a critique on the social issues of the nineteenth century.

The painting was first shown to the public in 1873 in St Petersburg at an exhibition that would eventually go to Vienna for the World Exhibition event. The reaction of the public was controversial: academic painters reacted negatively, criticizing the painting. Other artists, writers and poets praised the work, among them Nikolai Gogol and Fyodor Dostoevsky. At the World Exhibition in Vienna the reactions remained controversial, although the painting was bought by duke Vladimir Alexandrovich. Currently Barge Haulers on the Volga is on display at the Russian Museum in St Petersburg .

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  • Bluenose Canadian Schooner

Hull Painting Plan

July 3, 2016

Our first big round of painting involves two areas of the ship.  We need to paint the interior (waterways and bulwarks) and exterior (hull).

I’m going to start with the interior.  Two reasons for this.  First, the colors used on the interior are light, and will be difficult to apply if I get any of the darker hull paints on those areas.  Second, they are small and contained, so once they are painted I can easily mask them off and paint the hull without worrying about messing up my paint job.

Waterways and Bulwarks

So, first I need to paint the waterways and bulwarks.  The waterways are grey, and the bulwarks/stanchions are white.  The waterway on the fore deck is three boards wide, while the one on the quarter deck is one board wide (between the stanchions).  I previously masked off all the decking, so right now I have exposed waterways and bulwarks, covered in grey primer.

I plan to paint the waterways first, and I’m not going to bother masking the bulwarks.  Since the primer is grey, and my waterway paint is grey, I don’t see a need to mask the bulwarks – either way I’m painting white over grey.  I could leave the waterways as primer, but I want to get a nice consistent coat of my chosen grey on there, rather than be stuck with the default color of the primer.

The grey will be airbrushed on to the waterways, probably requiring at least 2 coats.

After the grey dries, I’ll go in an mask off the waterways using the yellow Tamiya tape.  This will probably take some time, since I’ll have to get it in-between the stanchions.  Once the waterway is masked, I’ll spray white on the bulwarks and stanchions.  This will probably take 2-3 coats.

The hull of the Model Shipways Bluenose has two main colors – red and black – and two stripes – white and yellow.  This means that we need to plan our attack to ensure we get good clean lines and nice colors.

For example, if we start with black, it will be hard to paint on the yellow or white on top (covering black is hard).  It is also difficult to get a masking line set up in the exact same spot consistently.  So, we don’t want to mask the black, paint, then try to line the next color right up to the edge.  We’ll end up with odd overlaps or gaps where the primer shows through.

So, I am going to follow this general plan:

(Please forgive my crude drawings…sizes and lines are not to scale.)

Primer

We start with the entire hull covered in grey primer.

We start with the hull primered.  Everything is grey.  We mark the waterline according to the plans.  The waterline is level of the water when the ship is at sea, and it typically represents the point at which colors change or copper plating stops.

The Bluenose has a white stripe at the waterline.  So, we’ll start by spraying on some white, right round the waterline.  We won’t bother masking for this, since white is covered easily by all our other colors.

White

White is sprayed on at the waterline – we don’t need to worry about getting a clean edge.

Next we’ll apply the yellow.  The Bluenose has a yellow strip up near the scruppers.  We’ll use a little bit of masking tape here just to ensure we don’t overspray and mess up our white, but we don’t need to worry about a clean line.

Yellow

Yellow is sprayed on near the top.  Again, we don’t need a clean edge, but we don’t want to cover up the white.

After the yellow is in place,  we’ll move on to the red.  Instead of copper plating, the Bluenose simply has a red painted hull below the waterline.  Here it will be important to mask the top edge, right at the waterline.  It may be necessary to redraw the waterline since our white paint might have covered it up.  We need a nice, crisp line at the waterline.

Red

The lower hull is painted red.  This requires a good mask at the waterline to give a nice crisp lower edge to the white stripe.

Finally, we will put on the black.  Technically the Bluenose used a ‘midnight blue’, but it basically looks black.  I’m just going to use black.

This color will be the trickiest.  We need to mask the lower edge so we leave a strip of white visible at the waterline.

Up near the top, we actually need to mask a stripe of yellow – and get a nice clean edge on both the top  and bottom of the yellow.  To do this, I will probably mask off the entire top portion (starting at the bottom edge of the yellow and going all the way up).  Then paint with black between the white and yellow stripes.  Once that dries, I’ll remove the masking, and mask from the top edge of the yellow  down .  This will allow me to paint the top of the hull, above the yellow line.

Others have used thin tape to mask the yellow and simply paint around it.  I don’t have much thin tape, and I’m not sure it is good enough quality to get a clean mask.  Additionally, I think I want that strip pretty narrow, and my tape is too wide.  By masking and painting twice, I can control the width of that yellow line.

Black

Black is painted on in two passes.  The first masks the top of the white stripe and the bottom of the yellow stripe.  The second masks the top of the yellow stripe and fills in the upper part of the hull to the top of the bulwarks.

And then we’re done!  With the hull.

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Taylor Lane Yacht and Ship

Yacht Painting and Refinishing

Yacht Painting and Refinishing Services Fort Lauderdale and Fort Pierce Florida

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World-renowned paint jobs.

Custom membrane enclosures erected in-the-water or on the hard provide a safe, clean, environmentally secure structure for painting of hull, superstructure, mast or any combination or part thereof.

Our specialties include removing rigs and painting masts and booms for large sailboats. Our Fort Pierce facility has expansive areas making it possible to paint, store or step masts.

Topcoat refinishing, spot repair & maintenance, sand-blasting, and anti-fouling.

We have expertise with full engine room customization's and detailing.

Leveling and flow coating decks and tanks.

Flexible to use your preferred paint manufacturer products to ensure the highest quality paint finishes.

Climate controlled paint booths for small parts.

Foil wrap on hull and/or superstructure available.

US Attack Sub, Canada Navy Patrol Ship Arrive in Cuba on Heels of Russian Warships

Reuters

The crew of the Russian nuclear-powered cruise missile submarine Kazan watch the Canadian navy patrol boat HMCS Margaret Brooke passing by as it enters Havana’s bay, Cuba, June 14, 2024. REUTERS/Stringer

By Dave Sherwood

HAVANA (Reuters) -A Canadian navy patrol ship sailed into Havana early on Friday, just hours after the United States announced a fast-attack submarine had docked at its Guantanamo naval base in Cuba, both vessels on the heels of Russian warships that arrived on the island earlier this week.

The confluence of Russian, Canadian and U.S. vessels in Cuba - a Communist-run island nation just 145 km (90 miles) south of Florida - was a reminder of old Cold War tensions and fraught ties between Russia and Western nations over the Ukraine war.

However, both the U.S. and Cuba have said the Russian warships pose no threat to the region. Russia has also characterized the arrival of its warships in allied Cuba as routine.

The Admiral Gorshkov frigate and the nuclear-powered submarine Kazan, half submerged with its crew on deck, sailed into Havana harbor on Wednesday after conducting "high-precision missile weapons" training in the Atlantic Ocean, Russia's defence ministry said.

Canada`s Margaret Brooke patrol vessel began maneuvers early on Friday to enter Havana harbor, part of what the Canadian Joint Operations Command called "a port visit ... in recognition of the long-standing bilateral relationship between Canada and Cuba."

Hours earlier, the U.S. Southern Command said the fast-attack submarine Helena had arrived on a routine port visit to Guantanamo Bay, a U.S. naval base on the tip of the island around 850 km (530 miles) southeast of Havana.

"The vessel's location and transit were previously planned," Southern Command said on X.

Cuba`s foreign ministry said it had been informed of the arrival of the U.S. submarine but was not happy about it.

"Naval visits to a country are usually the result of an invitation, and this was not the case," said Vice Foreign Minister Carlos Fernández de Cossío.

"Obviously we do not like the presence in our territory (of a submarine) belonging to a power that maintains an official and practical policy that is hostile against Cuba."

A Canadian diplomat characterized the Margaret Brooke`s arrival as "routine and part of long-standing cooperation between our two countries", adding it was "unrelated to the presence of the Russian ships."

Russia and Cuba were close allies under the former Soviet Union, and tensions with Washington over communism in its "backyard" peaked with the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. Moscow has maintained ties with Havana.

When asked what message Moscow was sending, Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said on Thursday the West never appeared to take notice when Russia sent signals through diplomatic channels.

"As soon as it comes to exercises or sea voyages, we immediately hear questions and a desire to know what these messages are about," Zakharova said. "Why do only signals related only to our army and navy reach the West?"

The Russian warships are expected to remain in Havana harbor until Monday.

(Reporting by Dave Sherwood; Additional reporting by Marc Frank; Editing by Frances Kerry and Cynthia Osterman)

Copyright 2024 Thomson Reuters .

Photos You Should See - June 2024

The Olympic rings are seen on the Eiffel Tower Friday, June 7, 2024 in Paris. The Paris Olympics organizers mounted the rings on the Eiffel Tower on Friday as the French capital marks 50 days until the start of the Summer Games. The 95-foot-long and 43-foot-high structure of five rings, made entirely of recycled French steel, will be displayed on the south side of the 135-year-old historic landmark in central Paris, overlooking the Seine River. (AP Photo/Aurelien Morissard)

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Election latest: Labour projected to secure best-ever election victory - and more than half of cabinet set to lose

Labour are on course for their best-ever election result and the Tories their worst since before the First World War, according to a new YouGov poll for Sky News. It also shows several cabinet casualties, a win for Nigel Farage, and huge gains for the Liberal Democrats across the UK.

Wednesday 19 June 2024 17:30, UK

  • General Election 2024

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

New YouGov poll for Sky News

  • Labour on course for best-ever election result
  • Top Tories tipped to lose - with more than half of cabinet at risk
  • Look up the projected result where you live
  • Sam Coates: Tory wipeout on the cards in multiple regions
  • Live reporting by Samuel Osborne

Other election news

  • Coming up on  Politics Hub With Sophy Ridge  at 7pm
  • PM welcomes fall in inflation
  • SNP launches manifesto - see main policies
  • Galloway's Workers Party outlines key pledges
  • Gurpreet Narwan: Galloway's 2024 success may have peaked

Election essentials

  • Manifesto pledges:  Conservatives | Greens | Labour | Lib Dems | Plaid Cymru | Reform | SNP
  • Trackers:  Who's leading polls? | Is PM keeping promises?
  • Campaign Heritage:  Memorable moments from elections gone by
  • Follow Sky's politics podcasts:  Electoral Dysfunction | Politics At Jack And Sam's
  • Read more:  Who is standing down? | Key seats to watch | What counts as voter ID? | Check if your constituency is changing | Guide to election lingo | Sky's election night plans

This evening's mammoth YouGov poll for Sky News is projecting a whopping 425 seats for Labour and a lowly 108 for the Tories.

The Lib Dems would win 67, the SNP 20, Reform UK five, Plaid four, the Greens two, and 18 would go to other parties.

You can see what result is projected for your constituency below:

Since the last YouGov MRP projection at the beginning of June, the pollster has changed its calls in 59 seats.

The Tories have dropped 32 seats since then, Labour has gained three seats in this projection, while the Lib Dems are up 19, SNP up three and Plaid Cymru up two.

Reform UK wins five seats under the new projection, having previously been on course to win zero according to YouGov. This includes Reform leader Nigel Farage winning his seat in Clacton.

Some 109 seats are still listed as a "toss-up" - but if all toss-up and close races in every seat where the Conservatives are second went in their favour, rather than in the direction assumed in this poll, then Labour would still have a majority of 132.

The Conservatives in that scenario would win 153 seats – still their lowest on record and far below what Labour won in 2019 under then-leader Jeremy Corbyn.

The projection vote shares implied by this MRP are Labour on 39%, the Tories on 22%, Reform on 15%, Lib Dems on 12% and Greens on 7%.

This means the Labour majority and seat tally have both gone up, even though Labour’s implied vote share is down three points since the start of June.

The big winners are Reform, up from 10% to 15% and the Lib Dems, up from 11% to 12%.

The polling for the projection was conducted from last Tuesday to this Tuesday with 39,979 people interviewed online: 36,161 in England and Wales and 3,818 in Scotland.

It suggests the Conservatives would be a party predominantly of the South East, South West and East of England. 

The party risks a complete or near wipeout in the North East, North West and Wales.

The YouGov MRP poll projects many big names will lose their seats on election night.

Some 15 of 27 cabinet members still standing in the election are set to lose, according to the projection.

Let's have a look at who they are and what their previous majority in their constituencies was.

Jeremy Hunt

Chancellor Jeremy Hunt has been the Tory MP for South West Surrey since 2005.

He held the seat with a 32,191 vote majority (53.3%) in 2019.

Mr Hunt is standing in the newly created constituency of Godalming and Ash this year against the Green's Ruby Tucker, Labour's James Walsh, the Liberal Democrats' Paul Follows, Reform UK's Graham Drage and Women's Equality's Harriet Williams.

Grant Shapps

The defence secretary has been the MP for Welwyn Hatfield in Hertfordshire since 2005. He won the seat with 27,394 votes in 2019, a majority of 52.6%.

He is standing against Jack Aaron for Reform UK, Sarah Butcher for the Greens, Andrew Lewin for Labour and John Munro for the Liberal Democrats.

Penny Mordaunt

Penny Mordaunt has served as the leader of the House of Commons and has been the MP for Portsmouth North since 2010.

Ms Mordaunt, who has twice run for the Tory party leadership, held the seat with 61.4% of the vote in 2019, securing 28,172 votes.

She will face Simon Dodd from the Liberal Democrats, Amanda Martin from Labour, Stuart Robinson from the Greens and Melvyn Todd from Reform UK.

Victoria Atkins

Health Secretary Victoria Atkins was elected MP for Louth and Horncastle in Lincolnshire in 2015 and garnered 38,021 votes (72.7%) in 2019.

She will face Iconic Arty-Pole from the Monster Raving Loony party, independent Paul Hugill, Reform UK's Sean Matthews, Marcus Moorehouse for the SDP, Ross Pepper for the Lib Dems, Jonathan Slater for Labour and Robert Watson for the Greens.

Lucy Frazer

The culture secretary has been the MP for South East Cambridgeshire since 2015.

In 2019, she won 32,187 votes, or 50%.

Ms Frazer will stand in the new constituency of Ely and East Cambridgeshire against Robert Bayley for the SDP, Charlotte Cane for the Lib Dems, Andy Cogan for the Greens, Ryan Coogan for Reform UK, Hoo-Ray Henry for the Monster Raving Loony party, Labour's Elizabeth McWilliams and independents Obi Monye and Rob Rawlins.

Thangam Debbonaire

One Labour shadow cabinet minister, Thangam Debbonaire, is predicted to lose her seat to the Greens.

The shadow culture secretary has been MP for Bristol West since 2015 and garnered 62.3% of the vote with 47,028 votes in 2019.

The seat will be renamed Bristol Central and Ms Debonaire will be up against Reform UK's Robert Clarke, the Lib Dems' Nicholas Coombes, Carla Denyer from the Green party, Kellie-Jay Keen from the Party of Women and Conservative Samuel Williams.

Labour is on course for a historic majority of 200, according to a new YouGov projection for Sky News.

Sir Keir Starmer's party is tipped to win a commanding 425 seats, more than double the 202 won in 2019 and the party's best-ever result.

The Tories would slump to the lowest number of parliamentary seats since the party's formation with 108 - down from the 365 won in 2019 and even lower than a previous low of 141 in 1906.

It would give Sir Keir's party the second-largest majority since the Second World War when voters go to the polls on 4 July.

This poll gives Labour an even bigger win than previous MRP surveys, which are considered the gold standard for projecting results due to the large sample size of respondents and the additional information they take into account - such as geographic location.

Compared to YouGov's last poll of this type, from 3 June, the Tories have lost another 32 seats and Labour have gained three.

Some 15 of 27 Tory cabinet members still standing in this general election are projected to lose - including Chancellor Jeremy Hunt, Defence Secretary Grant Shapps, and Commons leader Penny Mordaunt.

How do the other parties fare?

The Liberal Democrats would win 67 seats under this projection, a huge six-times the number of seats they won in 2019.

That's their best result since the party's formation, too.

John Swinney's SNP is tipped to drop to 20 seats, down from the 48 Nicola Sturgeon won in the last general election. 

Nigel Farage's Reform UK is on course for five seats, including the party leader winning Clacton, while the Greens have two and Plaid Cymru have four.

Our weeknight politics show  Politics Hub With Sophy Ridge  will be live on Sky News from 7pm.

The fast-paced programme dissects the inner workings of Westminster, with interviews, insights, and analysis - bringing you, the audience, into the corridors of power.

Tonight features the first of Sophy's leader interviews for the 2024 general election campaign: Sir Ed Davey of the Liberal Democrats.

The pair discuss the party's plans for immigration, its stance on potentially rejoining the EU's single market, and why Sir Ed has been so open about caring for his son.

And of course, his campaign stunts come up too.

Watch live on Sky News, in the stream at the top of this page, and follow live updates here in the Politics Hub.

Watch  Politics Hub  from 7pm every night during the election campaign on Sky channel 501, Virgin channel 602, Freeview channel 233, on the  Sky News website  and  app  or on  YouTube .

George Galloway spent much of his manifesto speech talking about Nigel Farage. 

The leader of the Workers Party of Britain warned of a political vacuum that was being created by the perceived failure of the major parties. 

He said Reform UK was making dangerous advances as a result.

"There's a real chance Nigel Farage will run away with this election," he said.

While Reform UK and the Workers Party sit on opposite ends of the political spectrum, both seek to fill that aforementioned vacuum.

But Mr Galloway's party is not building the same kind of momentum and current polling suggests it won't return a single MP.

That would be a step back from February, when Mr Galloway won the Rochdale by-election, dropping candidate Azhar Ali at late notice after he was accused of antisemitism. 

At the same time, Mr Galloway successfully capitalised on the frustration and anger at Labour's position on the Israel-Gaza conflict among Rochdale's Muslim population.

Muslims make up 20% of the population in Rochdale and there are 28 seats nationwide where they comprise more than a fifth. 

Labour are directing activists to places like Luton to shore up support in the face of a threat from independent candidates and parties taking a strong pro-Palestine stance.

Mr Galloway warned today that Labour had lost the Muslim vote over their foreign policy stance. 

Yet most Muslims rate the cost of living crisis and the NHS as their main priorities, ahead of the Middle East.

Labour might be concerned about losing some Muslim voters, but the majority are still planning to vote for them - and in higher numbers than the rest of the population.

Mr Galloway's opponents in Rochdale on 4 July are:

  • Andy Kelly, Lib Dems;
  • Martyn Savin, Greens;
  • Michael Howard, Reform;
  • Paul Waugh, Labour;
  • Paul Ellison, Conservatives.

The Workers Party of Britain has launched its manifesto today.

The party is led by George Galloway, who won a by-election in Rochdale earlier this year and is looking to retain the seat.

Here is what his party wants to do:

  • Raise the personal tax threshold to £21,200;
  • Introduce a one off 5% wealth tax on all estates "valued fairly" at over £10m - estimated to bring in a £17bn windfall;
  • Call for a single state in which all those born in Palestine and Israel can "live in peace with equal rights";
  • Review defence and foreign policy, including a referendum on the UK's NATO membership in which the party would back leave;
  • Introduce a migration policy that "reflects anxiety among the working class" but also acknowledges "some of this anxiety is stoked by the racist right";
  • Consider the nationalisation of rail, electricity, water, the military-industrial complex, national food logistics, ports, and airports;
  • Hold a net-zero referendum to create a national debate "on who profits from these targets and on what terms", and oppose ULEZ initiatives;
  • Propose major review of pensions policy - aiming to restore option of all workers retiring at 60;
  • Free public travel for children - as in London - for the rest of the country;
  • Free "good quality and nutritious" breakfast and lunch meals during term time to all children without means testing;
  • Get police to "refocus on street safety and estate crime as an antidote to policing by Twitter and criminalising speech and thought".

The wives of three Conservative ministers - including the PM - have been out on the campaign trail.

Susie Cleverly, wife of Home Secretary James Cleverly; Lucia Hunt, wife of Chancellor Jeremy Hunt; and Akshata Murty, wife of Prime Minister Rishi Sunak; joined Culture Secretary Lucy Frazer in Ely and East Cambridgeshire constituency today.

The group were seen handing out leaflets in Fordham, Suffolk.

The full list of candidates for Ely and East Cambridgeshire is:

  • Robert Bayley, Social Democratic Party;
  • Charlotte Cane, Liberal Democrats;
  • Andy Cogan, Green Party;
  • Ryan Coogan, Reform UK;
  • Lucy Frazer, Conservative Party;
  • Hoo-Ray Henry, Monster Raving Loony Party;
  • Elizabeth McWilliams, Labour Party;
  • Obi Monye, independent;
  • Rob Rawlins, independent.

By Ashish Joshi , health correspondent

In the SNP manifesto it says funding for Scotland's NHS "has more than doubled" and "staffing is at a record high" - with "far more doctors and nurses per head" than in the rest of the UK.

This is true. 

What is also true is that since the pandemic, the Scottish NHS workforce has grown substantially, but its hospital productivity has fallen.

Higher spending and recruitment has not been matched by an increase in the number of patients being seen and cared for. 

Scotland's elective waiting list has grown (more than England's), as have the country's longer term waits for operations and A&E waiting times (though these are higher in England).

The SNP says it will invest £300m to drive down these waiting times, money it says it will raise through "devolution of tax powers". 

The Scottish government spends more on health than any other area.

And with an ageing population with complex health needs, it will need to spend more in the years ahead.

According to research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies, at the start of devolution Scotland was spending more per person on health than England or Wales, but this gap has narrowed. 

The Scottish Fiscal Commission projects spending will need to grow by around 3% in real terms over the next two decades and that much of this spending will go towards increased staffing.

In the past hour or so, Just Stop Oil released a video of its members spraying Stonehenge with orange paint.

They did this to warn of the climate crisis ahead of this week's summer solstice.

Sunak: A disgraceful act of vandalism

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak was asked about the incident this afternoon.

He said: "This is a disgraceful act of vandalism to one of the UK's and the world's oldest and most important monuments.

"Just Stop Oil should be ashamed of their activists, and they and anyone associated with them, including a certain Labour Party donor, should issue a condemnation of this shameful act immediately."

Dale Vince, a Labour donor who previously donated to Just Stop Oil, said last year he had stopped giving money to the group.

Starmer: Just Stop Oil are pathetic

Sir Keir Starmer has also condemned the incident today.

"The damage done to Stonehenge is outrageous," he tweeted.

"Just Stop Oil are pathetic. 

"Those responsible must face the full force of the law."

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WTOP News

Yemen’s Houthi rebels launch boat-borne bomb attack against Greek-owned ship in Red Sea

The Associated Press

June 13, 2024, 12:13 AM

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ABOARD THE USS LABOON IN THE RED SEA (AP) — Yemen’s Houthi rebels launched a boat-borne bomb attack against a commercial ship in the Red Sea on Wednesday, authorities said, the latest escalation despite a U.S.-led campaign trying to protect the vital waterway.

The use of a boat loaded with explosives raised the specter of 2000’s USS Cole attack, a suicide assault by al-Qaida on the warship when it was at port in Aden, killing 17 on board. Associated Press journalists saw the Cole in the Red Sea on Wednesday, now taking part in the U.S. campaign while visiting one of her sister ships, the USS Laboon.

Yemen’s military spokesman Brig. Gen. Yahya Saree claimed responsibility for the attack, identifying the vessel targeted as the Liberian-flagged, Greek-owned bulk carrier Tutor. He described the attack as using a “drone boat,” as well as drones and ballistic missiles.

In a warning to shippers, the British military’s United Kingdom Maritime Trade Operations center described the vessel as being hit in its stern by a small white craft southwest of the Houthi-controlled port city of Hodeida.

The captain “reports the vessel is taking on water, and not under command of the crew,” the UKMTO said. He also “reports the vessel was hit for a second time by an unknown airborne projectile.”

The U.S. military’s Central Command also acknowledged the attack, saying the Tutor “most recently docked in Russia.”

“The impact of the (drone boat) caused severe flooding and damage to the engine room,” it added.

The U.S. military separately destroyed three anti-ship cruise missile launchers in Houthi-held Yemen, as well as one rebel drone over the Red Sea. The Houthis launched two anti-ship ballistic missiles over the Red Sea, but they caused no damage, Central Command said.

The Houthis, who seized Yemen’s capital nearly a decade ago and have been fighting a Saudi-led coalition since shortly after, have been targeting shipping throughout the Red Sea corridor over the Israel-Hamas war in the Gaza Strip.

They say the attacks are aimed at stopping the war and supporting the Palestinians, though the attacks often target vessels that have nothing to do with the conflict .

The war in Gaza has killed more than 36,000 Palestinians there, while hundreds of others have been killed in Israeli operations in the West Bank. It began after Hamas-led militants attacked Israel on Oct. 7, killing about 1,200 people and taking around 250 hostage.

The Houthis have launched more than 50 attacks on shipping, killed three sailors, seized one vessel and sunk another since November, according to the U.S. Maritime Administration. A U.S.-led airstrike campaign has targeted the Houthis since January, with a series of strikes May 30 killing at least 16 people and wounding 42 others, the rebels say.

Associated Press journalists on an embark with the U.S. Navy were interviewing Cmdr. Eric Blomberg, the commanding officer of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer Laboon, when the alert came in on the attack. Blomberg took multiple calls from sailors on board the vessel, giving updates on the apparent attack.

The Laboon is one of the destroyers accompanying the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower aircraft carrier and both has shot down Houthi fire and escorted vessels through the region. Though Blomberg and others stressed they were still investigating the attack, he said it appeared the vessel targeted had nothing to do with the Israel-Hamas war.

The Houthis “hit ships that are completely not associated or tied to the U.S. or Israel at all,” Blomberg said.

“These are just innocent merchant sailors carrying goods through the Red Sea, trying to get it through the least-expensive route, and they’re paying for it,” he said.

Copyright © 2024 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

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