ghost stories podcast uk

[PARANORMAL PODCAST]

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Welcome to the Ghostpod Podcast

Real ghost stories from the uk and beyond.

Classic Ghost Stories

Classic Ghost Stories

Tony Walker

A weekly podcast that reads out ghost stories, horror stories, and weird tales every week. Classic stories from the pens of the masters Occasionally, we feature living authors, but the majority are dead. Some perhaps are undead. We go from cosy Edwardian ghost stories (E. F. Benson, Walter De La Mare) to Victorian supernatural mysteries (M. R. James, Elizabeth Gaskell, Bram Stoker, and Charles Dickens) to 20th-century Weird Tales (Robert Aickman, Fritz Lieber, Clark Ashton-Smith, and H. P. Lovecraft) and wander from the Gothic to the Odd, even to the Literary, and then back again. Each episode is followed by Tony's take on the story, which can ramble on to discuss the weather, books, his dogs, what Sheila is foraging, and what he thinks of hauntology. Perfect to fall asleep to, and perfectly optional if you only want the tale itself. Get exclusive members episodes on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcud

Categories: Society & Culture

Listen to the last episode:

Henry James (1843–1916) was an American author renowned for his contributions to literature, particularly within the realm of psychological realism. Born in New York City, James spent much of his life traveling between Europe and the United States, which greatly influenced his cosmopolitan worldview and writing style. Known for his intricate character studies and keen exploration of human psychology, James's works often delved into themes of social conventions, personal freedom, and the complexities of interpersonal relationships. Throughout his prolific career, he authored numerous novels, short stories, and essays, earning him recognition as one of the foremost literary figures of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Henry James made a special contribution to the ghost story genre through his unique blend of realism and supernatural elements. His ghost stories are characterized by their vague, psychological qualities, featuring unreliable narrators and a chilling mixture of realism and romantic suggestiveness. James challenged conventional notions of what constitutes a ghost, exploring the haunting power of guilt and remorse alongside more traditional supernatural elements. His works, including "The Turn of the Screw" and "The Ghostly Rental," continue to captivate readers with their rich prose, intricate character portraits, and haunting themes. "The Ghostly Rental," first published in Scribner's Monthly in September 1876, exemplifies Henry James's exploration of themes within the ghost story genre. This tale revolves around a grad student's fascination with an old soldier who visits an abandoned mansion to collect rent from his supposed ghostly daughter. Themes of guilt, redemption, and the blurred lines between reality and imagination permeate the narrative, as James challenges readers to ponder the nature of truth and the power of perception. Through its atmospheric setting and complex characters, "The Ghostly Rental" remains a timeless exploration of the human psyche and the haunting effects of past misdeeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Previous episodes

  • 253 - The Ghostly Rental by Henry James  Sat, 02 Mar 2024 <p>Henry James (1843–1916) was an American author renowned for his contributions to literature, particularly within the realm of psychological realism. Born in New York City, James spent much of his life traveling between Europe and the United States, which greatly influenced his cosmopolitan worldview and writing style. Known for his intricate character studies and keen exploration of human psychology, James's works often delved into themes of social conventions, personal freedom, and the complexities of interpersonal relationships. Throughout his prolific career, he authored numerous novels, short stories, and essays, earning him recognition as one of the foremost literary figures of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Henry James made a special contribution to the ghost story genre through his unique blend of realism and supernatural elements. His ghost stories are characterized by their vague, psychological qualities, featuring unreliable narrators and a chilling mixture of realism and romantic suggestiveness. James challenged conventional notions of what constitutes a ghost, exploring the haunting power of guilt and remorse alongside more traditional supernatural elements. His works, including "The Turn of the Screw" and "The Ghostly Rental," continue to captivate readers with their rich prose, intricate character portraits, and haunting themes. "The Ghostly Rental," first published in Scribner's Monthly in September 1876, exemplifies Henry James's exploration of themes within the ghost story genre. This tale revolves around a grad student's fascination with an old soldier who visits an abandoned mansion to collect rent from his supposed ghostly daughter. Themes of guilt, redemption, and the blurred lines between reality and imagination permeate the narrative, as James challenges readers to ponder the nature of truth and the power of perception. Through its atmospheric setting and complex characters, "The Ghostly Rental" remains a timeless exploration of the human psyche and the haunting effects of past misdeeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 252 - The Black Widow by John Glasby  Fri, 01 Mar 2024 <p>John Stephen Glasby (23 September 1928 – 5 June 2011) was a British author born in East Retford, Nottinghamshire. Trained as a research chemist and mathematician, Glasby's early career saw him balancing his scientific pursuits with a burgeoning passion for writing. His literary journey began in the 1950s and 1960s, during which he emerged as a prolific figure in the pulp publishing industry. Despite his scientific background, Glasby's literary ambitions led him to explore a wide array of genres, from speculative fiction and romance to westerns and spy thrillers. His ability to seamlessly transition between genres showcased his versatility as a writer, earning him a dedicated readership across various literary circles. Throughout his career, Glasby's output was characterized by both quantity and quality. Under numerous pseudonyms and house names, including "A. J. Merak," "John E. Muller," and "Chuck Adams," Glasby penned over 300 novels and short stories. His imaginative storytelling and attention to detail captivated readers, while his scientific acumen lent authenticity to his speculative works. Notably, Glasby's foray into speculative fiction produced enduring classics such as "Project Jove," showcasing his ability to blend scientific concepts with compelling narrative arcs. Additionally, his contributions to genres like westerns, romance, and espionage underscored his versatility and adaptability as an author, cementing his reputation as a multifaceted literary talent. Despite the commercial constraints of the pulp publishing industry, Glasby's literary legacy endured beyond his prolific output. His works continue to be celebrated for their enduring appeal and cultural significance, reflecting the diverse interests and talents of a writer who defied categorization. Beyond his literary contributions, Glasby's dedication to both scientific inquiry and creative expression left an indelible mark on the literary landscape, inspiring generations of readers and writers alike. With a career spanning decades and genres, John Stephen Glasby remains a revered figure in British literature, remembered for his prolific output, imaginative storytelling, and enduring impact on the world of letters. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 251 - The Tarroo-Ushtey by Nigel Kneale  Fri, 23 Feb 2024 <p>Nigel Kneale was a highly acclaimed British screenwriter and novelist, best known for his pioneering work in the science fiction genre, particularly the creation of the iconic character Professor Bernard Quatermass. Born on April 28, 1922, in the Isle of Man, Kneale began his career as a journalist before transitioning to writing for radio, television, and film. He was brought up in Barrow-in-Furness. His breakthrough came in the early 1950s with the BBC television series "The Quatermass Experiment," which introduced audiences to the brilliant and enigmatic scientist Professor Bernard Quatermass. This character, portrayed as a determined and sometimes morally conflicted scientist, became an enduring figure in British popular culture. Kneale continued to develop the Quatermass character in subsequent television series, including "Quatermass II" (1955) and "Quatermass and the Pit" (1958-1959), each exploring themes of science, technology, and the supernatural. These productions were praised for their intelligent storytelling and social commentary, earning Kneale a reputation as a master of speculative fiction. In addition to his work on Quatermass, Kneale penned numerous other scripts for television, including adaptations of classic novels and original dramas. He also wrote several acclaimed novels and contributed to feature films. Throughout his career, Kneale's writing was characterized by its thought-provoking themes, sharp dialogue, and innovative storytelling techniques. He was a key figure in establishing science fiction as a serious genre in British television and film. Nigel Kneale passed away on October 29, 2006, leaving behind a rich legacy of groundbreaking work that continues to influence writers and filmmakers to this day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 250 - The Shadow on The Moor by Stuart Strauss  Thu, 15 Feb 2024 <p>Stuart Strauss remains an enigmatic figure in the world of weird fiction, with scant information available about his life. He is known for a limited body of work, including "The Shadow on The Moor" (1928), "The Soul Tube" (1928), and "The Clenched Hand" (1934). The use of a pseudonym and language suggesting potential unfamiliarity with British culture has led to the assumption that Strauss might be an American author. "The Shadow on The Moor" is a tale that first appeared in the February 1928 issue of "Weird Tales." Its republication in the 2023 British Library anthology "Circles of Stone: Weird Tales of Pagan Sites and Ancient Rites," edited by Katy Soar, attests to the lasting intrigue and relevance of Strauss's work. The story captures a sense of foreboding in the British countryside, with standing stones taking on a malevolent presence. Strauss's work, including "The Shadow on The Moor," reflects thematic elements akin to the cosmic horror pioneered by H.P. Lovecraft. Lovecraft's influence is discernible in the eerie atmospheres and otherworldly entities that often pervade Strauss's narratives. Additionally, Strauss, like Lovecraft, explores the theme of ancient cults in remote villages, inhabited by seemingly backward rural characters. The fusion of cosmic horror and folk-horror themes creates an unsettling and atmospheric reading experience. The thematic exploration of ancient cults in Strauss's work aligns with Margaret Murray's witch-cult hypothesis, a theory that suggests accusations against witches in Europe were rooted in a clandestine pagan religion. Published in Murray's "The Witch-Cult in Western Europe" (1921), the hypothesis posits the existence of a pre-Christian religion centered around a horned god, symbolizing the cycle of seasons and harvests. The horned god's representation on Earth through chosen individuals, ritual sacrifices, and the preservation of this religion through secret covens are central elements of Murray's theory. Strauss's incorporation of such themes in "The Shadow on The Moor" aligns with the broader cultural fascination with ancient rites and mysterious practices. The narrative, enveloped in cosmic horror and folk-horror, echoes the anxieties of a bygone era, reflecting the convergence of literary imagination and anthropological speculation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 249 - Wake Not The Dead by Ernst Raupach  Fri, 09 Feb 2024 <p>Ernst Benjamin Salomo Raupach, born on May 21, 1784, in Straupitz, Silesia, was a prominent German dramatist of the 19th century. His literary career was marked by a diverse range of works, and his influence extended beyond his homeland. After studying theology in Halle, Raupach ventured to St Petersburg in 1804, where he immersed himself in various pursuits, including writing tragedies and delivering sermons. Later, he settled in Berlin in 1824, dedicating the remainder of his life to writing for the stage. Raupach's impact on Prussian theatre during the early-to-mid 19th century solidified his place in German literary history. He passed away in Berlin on March 18, 1852. "Wake Not The Dead" ("Laßt die Todten ruhen"), a short story by Ernst Raupach, published in Minerva magazine in 1823, stands as one of the earliest contributions to vampire literature. This tale, exploring the macabre theme of the undead, showcases Raupach's ability to evoke suspense and mystery. The story follows the Gothic tradition, intertwining elements of horror with a narrative that predates the popularization of vampire motifs in the English-speaking world. Despite its significance, "Wake Not The Dead" faced misattribution, being erroneously credited to Ludwig Tieck in English translations. Raupach's work emerged during a period of heightened interest in Gothic literature and vampire themes in Europe. In the early 19th century, vampire hysteria and fascination with the supernatural were prevalent. This context, coupled with Raupach's travels and exposure to different cultures, likely influenced the creation of "Wake Not The Dead." The 18th-century vampire hysteria, marked by incidents in the Habsburg Monarchy and Eastern Europe, played a role in shaping the Gothic atmosphere of the story. The publication of the story in 1823 places it within a historical continuum of the exploration and popularization of vampire narratives in European literature, contributing to the broader evolution of the Gothic genre. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 248 - The Beast In The Cave by H. P. Lovecraft  Fri, 02 Feb 2024 <p>This is a reading of H. P. Lovecraft's The Beast In The Cave. "The Beast in the Cave" is a short story written by H. P. Lovecraft, a famous American horror fiction writer. He first came up with the initial version in the Spring of 1904, and by April 1905, at the age of fourteen, he completed the final draft. The story was initially published in June 1918 in The Vagrant, a publication similar to today's well-edited fanzines. It's essential to note that this tale is considered part of Lovecraft's early works, often referred to as juvenilia, which means it was written during his youth. In the 1930s, Lovecraft would sometimes share a copy of the story's typescript with his promising young correspondents. He did this to showcase what he had accomplished at their age and to provide them with an initial exercise in rewriting. This served as a way for him to assess their creativity and potential. I came to read this story because I was contacted by Todd Thyberg of angelbomb.com who is a fine press producer. He's a graphic designer and artist who produces high-quality editions of his own work, but also that of classics in the sci-fi and horror genres such as you might have found in the pulp magazines of the early to mid 20th Century. Todd produces such finely crafted work that when he sent me a copy of his chapbook of The Beast In The Cave, I was minded to read it and interview him too. The second part of this episode is my interview with Todd Thyberg. His work can be accessed at his website: Angel Bomb, a Book Arts Studio https://www.angelbomb.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 247 - Three Miles Up by Elizabeth Jane Howard  Fri, 26 Jan 2024 <p>Elizabeth Jane Howard, born on March 26, 1923, in London, England, was a distinguished English novelist known for her versatile literary contributions. Howard began her career as an actress and model before venturing into writing in 1947. Throughout her prolific career, she penned 12 novels, with her most acclaimed work being the five-volume family saga, 'The Cazalet Chronicles.' Her narrative prowess was not confined to family sagas, as exemplified by her collaboration with Robert Aickman on the collection 'We Are For The Dark: Six Ghost Stories,' published in 1951. Although she gained widespread recognition for her family sagas, Howard's foray into the supernatural, as evidenced by 'Three Miles Up' and other stories, showcased her ability to masterfully blend genres and explore the complexities of human relationships. Elizabeth Jane Howard was secretary of the Inland Waterways Association. Ghost stories and the Inland Waterways Association (IWA) share a curious connection, intertwining literature and the preservation of Britain's canal  heritage. This connection is particularly evident through notable figures such as Robert Aickman, L. T. C. Rolt, and Elizabeth Jane Howard, each leaving a unique mark on both realms. Elizabeth Jane Howard's creative collaboration with Robert Aickman resulted in the publication of 'We Are For The Dark,' a collection that marked a significant departure from both authors' conventional works. Released in 1951, the anthology features six ghost stories, three contributed by each author. Notably, the book was published during their romantic relationship. Robert Aickman describes her as “one of the most brilliant [of women]” and a bit of a looker “so beautiful that continuous problems arose, especially when, at a later date, she joined the Association’s Council. Little in the way of completely normal business was possible or sensible, when she was in the room. … By merely existing, she promoted loves and hates which, through no fault of hers, left some who felt them, fevered and wasted”. My reading of Three Miles Up is that it is a modern fairy story where Sharon represents one of the fae and leads them into The Perilous Realm. Fairyland is not always a beautiful alluring place, it can be a place of horror and strangeness. We cannot trust the Good People, no matter how fair they seem. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 246 - The Second Passenger by Basil Copper  Fri, 19 Jan 2024 <p>Basil Copper, born on February 5, 1924, in London, and passing away on April 3, 2013, was an English writer who initially pursued a career in journalism and newspaper editing before transitioning to full-time authorship in 1970. Beyond his literary pursuits, Copper cultivated diverse interests, including swimming, gardening, travel, sailing, and collecting historic films. Notably, he established the Tunbridge Wells Vintage Film Society and actively participated in esteemed film organizations in London. Basil Copper spent a significant portion of his life in Sevenoaks, Kent, and he was survived by his wife Annie, with whom he entered matrimony in 1960. Basil Copper's literary journey embarked with his inaugural short story, "The Curse," published at the age of 14. His professionally published debut, "The Spider," emerged in the Fifth Pan Book of Horror Stories in 1964. Venturing into novels, Copper made his mark with the Mike Faraday series, beginning with "The Dark Mirror" in 1966. Widely recognized for his series of Solar Pons stories, paying homage to Sherlock Holmes, Copper's association with editor August Derleth resulted in publications through Arkham House. Among his notable works are "Necropolis" (1980), a crossover between Victorian Gothic and detective fiction, and "The Great White Space" (1975), a novel influenced by Edgar Allan Poe and Lovecraft. Copper's macabre tales, including "The Academy of Pain" and "Beyond the Reef," underscored his mastery in horror fiction. His significant contributions earned him a Locus Award nomination in 1981, and in 2009, "Basil Copper: A Life in Books," a biographical work, received the British Fantasy Award for Best Non-Fiction. Basil Copper's literary impact endures, resonating through the realms of horror and detective fiction. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 245 - The Premonition by Lewis Darley  Fri, 12 Jan 2024 <p>Lewis Darley is a copywriter and illustrator living in Nottingham. He contacted me early in 2023 about an animated film he was making for his story The Premonition. This horror story is set in Bristol around 8 years ago. We agreed, I would record the audio and he would then do the long, hard work of animating the film. I said that I thought listeners would be interested in the story and then in him telling us about the project, so seven months after our first contact, we managed to record an interview. The delay was solely down to me, I should say. Anyway, I hope you enjoy the story and the interview afterwards: The Premonition by Lewis Darley Here are some links to Lewis's work Here's some links to my social pages and website: Website: https://www.lewisdarleyillustration.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/darleymakesart/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Darleymakesart Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/darleymakesart Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 244 - The Red Lodge by H R Wakefield  Fri, 05 Jan 2024 <p>Herbert Russell Wakefield (1888 – 2 August 1964) was a distinguished English writer known for his multifaceted contributions to literature. Born in Sandgate, Kent, he was the third child of Henry Russell Wakefield, a clergyman who later became the bishop of Birmingham. Educated at Marlborough College and University College, Oxford, Wakefield exhibited a broad range of talents, achieving second-class honours in Modern History while excelling in sports such as cricket, golf, hockey, and football. His World War I service with the Royal Scots Fusiliers, where he attained the rank of captain, and advocacy for the use of Chinese workers reflected his engagement with global issues. Wakefield's life encompassed roles as a secretary, publisher, and civil servant, and he navigated the complexities of relationships, experiencing divorce and entering into a second marriage with Jessica Sidney Davey. H. R. Wakefield's literary legacy is particularly distinguished by his mastery of ghost stories. As a short-story writer, novelist, and publisher, Wakefield crafted tales that often drew inspiration from his experiences, notably his tenure as chief editor for William Collins, Sons and Co. One of his notable works, "Messrs Turkes and Talbot," exemplifies his ability to infuse the mundane with eerie elements, drawing from the peculiarities of the publishing world. Wakefield's stories, characterized by their atmospheric prose and psychological depth, remain enduring contributions to the supernatural fiction genre. "The Red Lodge," a captivating story by H. R. Wakefield, was featured in his debut short story collection, "They Return at Evening" (1928). Set in a somewhat jaunty 1920s style, the narrative follows a protagonist who rents The Red Lodge, a seemingly charming country house, with his family. Wakefield expertly weaves an unconventional tale, blending social commentary with supernatural elements. The story takes unexpected turns as the protagonist, discontented with the landlord, resolves to expose the house's sinister nature through a consumer complaint. The inclusion of psychic perception, strange occurrences, and a dark history adds depth to the narrative. "The Red Lodge" stands as a testament to Wakefield's ability to transcend conventional ghost story tropes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 243 - The Irtonwood Ghost by Elinor Glyn  Fri, 29 Dec 2023 <p>Elinor Glyn, born Elinor Sutherland on October 17, 1864, in Jersey, Channel Islands, was a prominent English novelist and scriptwriter during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. She belonged to a wealthy and well-connected family, and her early life was marked by privilege and education. Glyn began her literary career with the publication of her first novel, "The Visits of Elizabeth," in 1899. However, she gained widespread recognition and success with her scandalous and sensational novel, "Three Weeks," published in 1907. The book, which depicted a passionate love affair between a young English aristocrat and an exotic Balkan queen, caused a considerable stir and established Glyn as a controversial figure in literary circles. Throughout her career, Elinor Glyn continued to write novels that explored themes of love, romance, and societal expectations. Some of her other notable works include "Beyond the Rocks" (1906), "Man and Maid" (1922), and "It" (1927). Her writing often delved into the complexities of human relationships, and her characters were known for their sophistication and sensuality. In addition to her literary pursuits, Glyn ventured into Hollywood, where she found success as a screenwriter during the silent film era. She worked on several film adaptations of her own novels, collaborating with renowned actors of the time. Elinor Glyn's impact on popular culture extended beyond her literary achievements. She was recognized as a style icon and a socialite, known for her wit and charm. Despite facing criticism for the perceived risqué content in her novels, Glyn remained a popular and influential figure, contributing to the changing landscape of literature and entertainment during the early 20th century. Elinor Glyn passed away on September 23, 1943, leaving behind a legacy as a trailblazing novelist who challenged societal norms and captured the imaginations of readers with her provocative and romantic storytelling. Her works continue to be studied and appreciated for their contribution to the literary and cultural landscape of her time. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 242 - The Story Of The Goblins Who Stole A Sexton by Charles Dickens  Mon, 25 Dec 2023 <p>Certainly! "The Story of the Goblins Who Stole a Sexton" is a short story written by Charles Dickens as part of his collection titled "The Pickwick Papers." The narrative follows Gabriel Grub, a grumpy and ill-tempered sexton (grave digger) in a small village. Gabriel despises Christmas and all its festivities, choosing instead to revel in his solitude. One Christmas Eve, while digging a grave in the churchyard, Gabriel encounters a group of goblins who emerge from the ground. The goblins, led by their king, force Gabriel to join them in their underworld festivities. In this fantastical realm, Gabriel witnesses scenes from his past and present, highlighting his callous behavior and the impact it has had on those around him. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 241 - A Strange Christmas Game by Charlotte Riddell  Fri, 22 Dec 2023 <p>Charlotte Riddell, born Charlotte Cowan in 1832, was a prolific and accomplished British writer during the Victorian era. She was recognized for her contributions to the literary landscape, particularly in the genres of Gothic fiction and supernatural tales. Riddell began her writing career in the mid-19th century, initially publishing under the pseudonym F. G. Trafford. Her early works demonstrated a keen interest in the mysterious and the macabre, drawing inspiration from the popular Gothic tradition of the time. One of her notable early works is "The Moors and the Fens," a collection of supernatural tales published in 1879. However, it was under her own name that Riddell gained widespread recognition. Her most well-known works include novels such as "George Geith of Fen Court" (1864) and "The Race for Wealth" (1865). These novels explored themes of finance, social class, and the changing landscape of Victorian society. Riddell's literary career was not limited to novels; she was also a prolific short story writer. Her short stories often delved into the eerie and uncanny, earning her a reputation as a skilled writer of ghost stories. Notable collections of her short stories include "Weird Stories" (1882) and "The Uninhabited House" (1875). Beyond her success as a writer, Charlotte Riddell faced the challenges of being a woman in a male-dominated literary world. Despite these obstacles, she managed to establish herself as a respected author and editor. Riddell's contributions to the literary landscape of her time were acknowledged, and she became a notable figure in the Victorian literary scene. In addition to her writing, Riddell was involved in editorial work. She co-edited the St. James's Magazine, demonstrating her commitment to fostering literary talent and contributing to the cultural discourse of the era. Charlotte Riddell's literary career spanned several decades, and her works continue to be studied and appreciated by scholars of Victorian literature. Her exploration of the supernatural, combined with astute observations of society, has left a lasting legacy in the realm of 19th-century British literature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 240 - Bone to His Bone by E. G. Swain  Fri, 15 Dec 2023 <p>Edmund Gill Swain, born on the 19th of February 1861 in Stockport, Cheshire, was a respected English cleric and author known for his contributions to the ghost story genre. Educated at Manchester Grammar School and Emmanuel College, Cambridge, Swain pursued Natural Sciences. Ordained as a deacon in 1885 and a priest in 1886 at Rochester, he served as a curate in Camberwell before assuming the role of chaplain at King's College, Cambridge, alongside the notable scholar and author M. R. James. The two shared living quarters within the college, fostering a collegial relationship that extended beyond their professional roles. Swain's duties included teaching at the college's choir school, showcasing his multifaceted engagement in academic life. His literary legacy reached a notable point with the 1912 publication of "The Stoneground Ghost Tales," a collection that demonstrated his skill in the supernatural and positioned him as an early imitator of James, leaving a lasting imprint on the genre. Within the collection, "Bone to His Bone" stands out as a quietly intriguing narrative. Set on a Christmas Eve, the story follows Reverend Bachtel, seeking matches in the dark, only to encounter a mysterious book on gardening. This spectral tome, once owned by a long-departed rector, subtly guides him to a specific spot in the garden. The unfolding events, marked by an understated approach to bibliomancy, reflect Swain's ability to handle hauntings without sensationalism. "Bone to His Bone" quietly underscores Swain's finesse, blending a touch of gentle humor with the supernatural, presenting a nuanced exploration of the ghostly that avoids overstatement. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 239 - Couching At The Door by D K Broster  Fri, 08 Dec 2023 <p>Dorothy Kathleen Broster, known by her pen name D.K. Broster, stands as a notable but often overlooked figure in literature, recognized for her exceptional talent in crafting short horror stories. Despite her relative obscurity in contemporary discussions, her contributions to the genre, particularly with works like "Couching at the Door," showcase her prowess in weaving tales of the supernatural. "Couching at the Door," although reprinted numerous times, may not be considered her magnum opus by some. Instead, stories like "Clairvoyance," "The Window," and "From the Abyss" are hailed as hidden gems, overlooked yet deserving of greater recognition. These tales, according to enthusiasts, have stood the test of time, maintaining their eerie allure even in the present day. Born in England in 1877, D.K. Broster led a multifaceted life. Her experiences as a Red Cross nurse during World War I added depth to her writing, and she gained acclaim for her historical novels. However, it is her foray into the supernatural short story genre that captivates readers seeking tales of the macabre. "Couching at the Door" (1933) unfolds the unsettling narrative of a poet haunted by a mysterious fur boa, a spectre from his past misdeeds. The story delves into the psychological realm, employing dream imagery to enhance the eerie atmosphere. The protagonist's desperate attempts to transfer this spectral presence to another add a layer of suspense and intrigue. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 238 - The Gardener by E F Benson  Fri, 01 Dec 2023 <p>Hugh and Margaret Grainger rent a lovely old house near a golf course. At the bottom of the garden is a mysterious, well-kept thatched cottage that appears unoccupied.  However, a visitor senses a strange presence within and occasionally sees lights or figures inside. Margaret, fascinated with communicating via planchette, starts receiving odd messages from an entity calling himself "the gardener."  He announces a desire to enter the main house, catapulting the Graingers into disturbing events.  The empty cottage is not so empty after all, and the gardener's unseen presence brings terror to the once-idyllic home.  Through the planchette, Margaret has unlocked a portal between worlds, allowing a malevolent spirit access into the realm of the living. Now the Graingers must confront the implications of meddling with forces beyond their understanding. I was sent the anthology The Dead of Winter https://profilebooks.com/work/the-dead-of-winter/ By profile books. The Gardener by E F Benson is one of ten classic winter ghost stories in that anthology edited by Cecily Gayford.  Thanks to Profile Books for the copy they sent me. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 237 - The Horror Under Penmire by Adrian Cole  Fri, 24 Nov 2023 <p>Adrian Christopher Synnot Cole, the celebrated British author, was born in Plymouth, England, on July 22, 1949. His early years were shaped by a family sojourn in Malaya due to his father's military service, which instilled in him a passion for the fantasy and science fiction genres. Influenced by literary classics like Tarzan and King Solomon's Mines, as well as cinematic marvels such as "Earth versus the Flying Saucers" and the original "Classics Illustrated War of the Worlds," and the works of Algernon Blackwood, Lovecraft, and Dennis Wheatley, he developed a deep-rooted love for the extraordinary. Adrian Cole's literary journey began when he discovered "The Lord of the Rings" while working in a public library in Birmingham. This masterpiece inspired him to craft his own epic, the "Dream Lords" trilogy. His writing career expanded to encompass ghost stories, horror, and fantasy, leading to the publication of four novels in England. Notably, his captivating tales received recognition in prestigious collections, and his editorial talents shone through in curations. Beyond his literary pursuits, he held various professional roles, including that of a librarian and an educational administrator. Among his many literary contributions, one particularly intriguing story, "The Horror Under Penmire" (1974), stands out. In this chilling tale, the protagonist, Phil, embarks on a quest to locate the mythical town of Penmire in remote Cornwall, following a plea for help from his friend Roy. However, upon his arrival, he finds Roy missing, and the locals deny any knowledge of his whereabouts. Unfazed, Phil stumbles upon Roy's mysterious notations, one of which alludes to the ominous name "Dagon," a reference that resonates profoundly with fans of H.P. Lovecraft's work. This narrative weaves a web of suspense and Lovecraftian intrigue, adding another layer to Adrian Cole's multifaceted literary career. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 236 - The Haunted Haven by A. Erskine Ellis  Fri, 17 Nov 2023 <p>Arthur Erskine Ellis, born on October 1, 1902, in Bangalore, British India, was a distinguished British biologist and author known for his remarkable contributions in two distinct realms. On the one hand, he was a dedicated scientist who left a lasting legacy in the field of malacology, particularly in the study of non-marine mollusks. His extensive body of work in this area, including numerous publications, established him as an authority in British non-marine malacology. From 1919 to 1961, he also demonstrated his passion for botany by contributing specimens of spermatophytes to various herbariums in Britain. His scientific pursuits reflected his deep appreciation for the natural world and his commitment to preserving its biodiversity. On the other hand, Arthur Erskine Ellis showcased his creative talents as an author, specializing in ghost stories. Notably, one of his notable works, "The Haunted Haven," delves into the supernatural with a chilling narrative set in Ticlas Haven, a fishing village off St. Brides Bay. This story revolves around three surly brothers who commit a heinous act – drowning their parsimonious uncle during a storm at sea in the hopes of inheriting his fortune. However, their plan takes a sinister turn as, within three months of the murder, each brother meets a tragic end. Subsequently, their vengeful, zombie-like spectres terrorize the villagers by embarking on eerie, ghostly journeys in their wrecked fishing smack after dark. The village doctor and innkeeper are compelled to intervene and put an end to the ghostly capers, but the spectres, resentful of interference, continue to haunt the South Haven, creating a chilling and suspenseful tale that is a testament to Ellis's prowess as a writer in the realm of the supernatural. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 235 - The Canterville Ghost by Oscar Wilde  Fri, 10 Nov 2023 <p>Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was a renowned Irish playwright, poet, and author known for his exceptional wit, flamboyant style, and profound contributions to late 19th-century literature. Born in Dublin, Wilde attended Oxford University and soon established himself as a prominent figure in London's literary and social circles. His works, including "The Picture of Dorian Gray" and "The Importance of Being Earnest," are celebrated for their clever dialogue, social satire, and exploration of the human condition. Wilde's unique blend of comedy, satire, and poignant commentary on Victorian society made him one of the most influential figures of his time. Unfortunately, his career took a tragic turn when he was convicted of "gross indecency" for his homosexuality, leading to his imprisonment and eventual death in Paris."The Canterville Ghost" is a classic novella penned by Oscar Wilde, first published in 1887. This humorous and haunting tale tells the story of the Otis family, Americans who move into Canterville Chase, a grand old English manor said to be haunted by Sir Simon, a ghost from centuries past. The novella is an exemplary demonstration of Wilde's wit and comedic genius, as he contrasts American pragmatism with British aristocracy and tradition. Wilde's sharp observations and clever humor in "The Canterville Ghost" provide a refreshing take on the traditional ghost story genre, injecting it with a delightful blend of satire and hilarity.Published during Wilde's literary peak, the novella garnered critical acclaim for its innovation and wit, positioning it as a unique departure from the conventional ghost stories of its era. Its humorous exploration of the clash between the Old World and the New World captivated readers. While it did not receive as much attention as some of Wilde's other works, "The Canterville Ghost" remains a cherished piece of literature and a testament to his enduring influence on the literary world. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 233 - The Horror at Chilton Castle  Fri, 03 Nov 2023 <p>Joseph Payne Brennan (1918-1990) was an American writer renowned for his contributions to horror, fantasy, and science fiction. Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, he nurtured his passion for writing from a young age and later pursued his love for literature at Yale University. Brennan's career as a librarian and researcher allowed him to immerse himself in the world of storytelling. In the 1950s and 1960s, he made a significant impact in the speculative fiction realm with his supernatural and psychologically gripping tales.Brennan was a prolific writer, known for his association with the Cthulhu Mythos, a shared universe created by H.P. Lovecraft and others. His works, such as "The Slime," "Levitation," and "The Feaster from Afar," showcased his mastery of eerie atmospheres and profound understanding of the human psyche. As an editor, he co-founded the influential magazine "Macabre" and also pursued his talents in poetry. Even after his passing in 1990, Joseph Payne Brennan's legacy endures, as his vivid storytelling and terrifying narratives continue to captivate and inspire fans of horror and fantasy literature. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 232 - Back From The Grave by Robert Silverberg  Tue, 31 Oct 2023 <p>Robert Silverberg, born in Brooklyn, New York, on January 15, 1935, is a highly esteemed author known for his significant contributions to the world of speculative fiction. With a career spanning several decades, Silverberg's journey into the literary world began in his early teenage years when he started submitting stories to science fiction magazines. He graduated from Columbia University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Literature in 1956, all while crafting stories that would earn him recognition as the "best new writer" with his first Hugo Award that same year. Notably, Silverberg's prolific output during the 1950s and 1960s, with an average of five published stories per month, established him as a prominent figure in the genre.However, in the late 1950s, Silverberg diversified his writing efforts to other genres due to changes in the science fiction market. This period saw him prolifically producing works under various pseudonyms, including a substantial collection of erotic novels published as "Don Elliott." His transition to exploring more literary themes began in the 1960s, a shift marked by his association with the "New Wave" movement and a renewed focus on character development and social depth. Later in his life, after experiencing personal challenges, he retired from writing in 1975 but returned with renewed vigor in 1980 with the acclaimed "Lord Valentine's Castle." In 2005, he received the prestigious title of SFWA Grand Master from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, cementing his legacy in the genre.During this period, Silverberg produced a string of critically acclaimed novels, including "To Open the Sky," "Downward to the Earth," "To Live Again," "The World Inside," and "Dying Inside." These works showcased his ability to merge profound themes with gripping narratives and garnered him multiple Hugo and Nebula Award nominations and wins. His return to writing in 1980 with "Lord Valentine's Castle" marked the beginning of the beloved Majipoor series, known for its intricate world-building and rich character development. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 231 - The Graveyard Rats by Henry Kuttner  Thu, 26 Oct 2023 <p>"The Graveyard Rats" stands as a testament to Henry Kuttner's exceptional storytelling prowess. This eerie tale, originally published in the March 1936 issue of Weird Tales, immerses readers in the haunting atmosphere of ancient Salem cemeteries. Kuttner expertly crafts a narrative that blends elements of horror and the supernatural, skillfully intertwining the unsettling presence of abnormally large rats with whispered legends of subterranean, inhuman entities. As readers venture deeper into the story's dark recesses, they are drawn into a world where the boundary between the natural and the supernatural blurs, evoking an eerie sense of foreboding and eldritch horror.Henry Kuttner, the creative genius behind "The Graveyard Rats," was a prolific American writer celebrated for his contributions to the science fiction and fantasy genres during the mid-20th century. Born in 1915 in Los Angeles, California, Kuttner's literary career began in the 1930s, coinciding with the Golden Age of Science Fiction. His versatility as a writer allowed him to excel in a wide range of speculative fiction sub-genres, from space opera to supernatural horror. Kuttner is particularly renowned for his collaborations with his wife, C.L. Moore, under various pseudonyms, producing a remarkable body of work that left a lasting impact on the world of speculative fiction.While Henry Kuttner's life was tragically cut short at the age of 42 in 1958, his legacy endures through his imaginative storytelling and thought-provoking themes. His work continues to captivate and inspire both fans and scholars, cementing his place as a revered figure in the history of speculative fiction. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 230 - The Beast of Averoigne by Clark Ashton Smith  Thu, 19 Oct 2023 <p>Clark Ashton Smith (1893–1961) was an American writer and artist known for his unique contributions to literature and art. - Born on January 13, 1893, in Long Valley, California, Smith came from a family of English and New England heritage.- He spent most of his life in Auburn, California, where he lived in a cabin built by his parents, Fanny and Timeus Smith.- Due to psychological disorders, Smith's formal education was limited, and he was taught at home after attending eight years of grammar school.- Smith was an insatiable reader with an extraordinary eidetic memory, and he read voraciously, including works by Edgar Allan Poe, Hans Christian Andersen, and others.- He even read the entire 11th edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica twice.- Smith's early literary efforts included fairy tales and imitations of the Arabian Nights, which he began writing at the age of 11.- He sold several tales to "The Black Cat," a magazine specializing in unusual stories, at the age of 17.- Smith's poetic talents blossomed, leading to acclaimed volumes like "The Star-Treader and Other Poems" and "Odes and Sonnets."- He was mentored by San Francisco poet George Sterling and gained international acclaim for his poetry.**Weird Fiction Phase: 1926–1935**- Smith transitioned to weird fiction during this period, possibly influenced by H.P. Lovecraft.- He created a plethora of imaginative creatures and wrote stories set in various fictional lands like Averoigne, Hyperborea, and Zothique.**Sculpture Period: 1935–1961**- Smith's interest in fiction waned, and he turned to sculpture, primarily using soft rock materials like soapstone.**Notable Literary Friendships:**- Smith was a part of the Lovecraft circle and had a lasting literary friendship with H.P. Lovecraft.- He corresponded with fellow writers like Robert E. Howard and E. Hoffmann Price.**Legacy and Unique Contributions:**- Clark Ashton Smith's work is celebrated for its rich vocabulary, cosmic perspective, and sardonic humor.- His weird fiction has been compared to the Dying Earth sequence of Jack Vance.- Smith's writing style aimed to captivate readers by using a variety of stylistic resources, akin to incantations.**Later Life and Marriage:**- In 1954, at the age of 61, Smith married Carol(yn) Jones Dorman, a woman with experience in Hollywood and radio public relations.- They lived in Pacific Grove, California, and Smith continued sculpting during this period.**Passing and Legacy:**- In 1961, Smith passed away quietly in his sleep at the age of 68.- His ashes were buried near his childhood home, and plaques recognizing his contributions have been erected in Auburn, California.Clark Ashton Smith's life was marked by a fascinating blend of artistic pursuits, from poetry and weird fiction to sculpture. His imaginative worlds and unique style continue to captivate readers and stand as a testament to his enduring legacy in the realms of literature and art. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 229 - Good Lady Ducayne by M E Braddon  Thu, 12 Oct 2023 <p>Mary Elizabeth Braddon (4 October 1835 – 4 February 1915) was a renowned English novelist of the Victorian era, celebrated for her sensational works. Her most famous creation, "Lady Audley's Secret," published in 1862, achieved both literary acclaim and multiple adaptations on stage and screen.Born in Soho, London, Braddon received a private education. Her parents, Henry and Fanny, separated when she was just five years old due to her father's infidelity. At the age of ten, her brother Edward Braddon departed for India and later became the Premier of Tasmania. To support herself and her mother, Mary worked as an actress for three years, befriending Clara and Adelaide Biddle during this period. Although they had minor roles, acting provided her with a means of livelihood until her growing interest in writing novels led her away from the stage.In April 1861, Mary met John Maxwell (1824–1895), a publisher of periodicals, and moved in with him. However, Maxwell was already married to Mary Ann Crowley and had five children with her. While Mary and Maxwell lived together as a couple, Crowley resided with her family. In 1864, Maxwell attempted to legitimize their relationship by publicly claiming they were married, but this was refuted by Richard Brinsley Knowles, Mary's brother-in-law, who revealed that Maxwell's true wife was still alive. Mary acted as a stepmother to Maxwell's children until 1874 when Maxwell's wife passed away, and they were finally able to marry at St. Bride's Church in Fleet Street. Together, they had six children: Gerald, Fanny, Francis, William, Winifred Rosalie, and Edward Herry Harrington.Fanny Margaret Maxwell, their eldest daughter, married the naturalist Edmund Selous in 1886. In the 1920s, they resided in Wyke Castle, where Fanny established a local branch of the Woman's Institute in 1923 and served as its first president.The second eldest son, William Babington Maxwell, went on to become a novelist in his own right, leaving his mark in the literary world.Mary Elizabeth Braddon passed away on 4 February 1915 in Richmond, then in Surrey, and was laid to rest in Richmond Cemetery. Her former residence, Lichfield House, situated in the town center, was replaced by Lichfield Court, a block of flats, in 1936. A plaque in Richmond parish church commemorates her as "Miss Braddon." Additionally, several nearby streets are named after characters from her novels, as her husband was involved in property development in the area. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 228 - The Hand of M R James by Sarah Tolmie  Thu, 05 Oct 2023 <p>It's been a long time since I’ve read a story by a living author. This story, “The Hand of M. R. James,” was written by Canadian author Sarah Tolmie, and it deals with a very strange occurrence—you may call it a haunting—that happens to an academic during the COVID pandemic. After the story, I ask Sarah about herself, about this story, and about her book Sacraments for the Unfit, from which collection, The Hand of M. R. James is taken. You can learn more about Sarah from her website Sarah Tolmie http://sarahtolmie.ca/ You can read reviews of the the book Sacraments For The Unfit and find links to buy it via this link http://sarahtolmie.ca/sacramentsReviews.html New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 226 - The Crimson Weaver by R. Murray Gilchrist  Thu, 28 Sep 2023 <p>Robert Murray Gilchrist, born on November 29, 1867, in Sheffield, England, was a Victorian writer whose literary contributions remain an intriguing enigma within the realm of Gothic and Decadent fiction. Educated at Sheffield Royal Grammar School and privately tutored, Gilchrist's inclination toward reclusiveness and introspection shaped his literary style. Despite publishing 22 novels and around a hundred short stories, his work, set predominantly in the early 1700s, reflects a unique blend of Gothic, Decadent, and weird sensibilities.An Analysis of "The Crimson Weaver" Story Through the Lens of Jungian Archetypal Psychology"The Crimson Weaver," one of Gilchrist's haunting tales, can be analyzed through the lens of Jungian archetypal psychology, revealing the story's hidden depths. The story's archetypal elements align with Carl Jung's concepts of the collective unconscious and its symbols. The Master and the servant, symbolizing conscious and unconscious aspects of the psyche, embark on a journey into the unknown, entering the Domain of the Crimson Weaver. The old woman's warning echoes the archetype of the wise crone, guiding them toward a confrontation with the Shadow—a dark, repressed aspect of the self.The Crimson Weaver herself embodies the anima archetype, representing the feminine and intuitive aspects of the unconscious. Her seductive allure and her weaving of lives on a loom point to her role as a life-giving and life-taking figure, reflecting the anima's dual nature.The setting, including the Domain and the enchanted land, symbolizes the liminal space between conscious and unconscious realms, akin to the archetypal threshold where transformation occurs. The strange beasts and grotesque creatures evoke the presence of the Shadow, embodying repressed fears and desires.The Master's lost love that he keeps as a shrine in his heart appears to be a kind of sacrifice. Is it this hankering that the Crimson Weaver feeds on???The Master's disappearance and the servant's encounter with the Weaver can be interpreted as a confrontation with the anima's transformative power. The Master's forgotten memory echoes the loss of the conscious ego in the face of the unconscious. The final union with the Weaver and the image of the vulture-legged woman signify a symbolic death and rebirth—a transformation of the ego through embracing the anima's influence.In "The Crimson Weaver," Gilchrist weaves a narrative that taps into the profound archetypal currents of the human psyche. His story becomes a tapestry of psychological symbols, inviting readers to explore the deeper layers of their own unconscious and engage with the universal themes that lie beneath the surface of the narrative. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 225 - The Lost Room by Fitz James O'Brien  Sat, 23 Sep 2023 <p>Fitz James O'Brien (1828 – April 6, 1862) was an Irish-American writer, best known for his works in the genre of science fiction and fantasy. Born in Cork, Ireland, he migrated to the United States in 1852 after squandering his inheritance. O'Brien settled in New York City and began his writing career which took off with his contributions to Harper's Magazine and the New York Saturday Press. He quickly gained popularity for his strange and imaginative stories. His most recognized works include "The Diamond Lens" and "What Was It? A Mystery", both of which are considered early contributions to the science fiction genre. While O'Brien's literary career was on the rise, the American Civil War broke out. He joined the Union Army in 1861 and was commissioned as a second lieutenant. Despite his talents as a writer, his military career was short-lived. In February 1862, he was injured in a skirmish and contracted tetanus from his wounds. He died on April 6, 1862, leaving behind a significant body of work that continues to be admired for its innovative and imaginative qualities. Visit us here: www.ghostpod.org Buy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalker If you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcud Music by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 224 - The Struwwelpeter by Tony Walker  Thu, 21 Sep 2023 <p>People have been asking for more of my own stories, so here's one. However, I have to warn you that I use the f-word in it and it is rather dark. It's possibly as dark as my Whitehaven Bodysnatcher, plus it has swearing (though it is necessary for the character I feel). So, if you prefer my sweeter stories, or don't like that word being used, I would avoid this one. It all starts with a man going walking in the Black Forest in Germany... New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 223 - The Werewolf by Eugene Field  Thu, 14 Sep 2023 <p>Step into the mysterious realm of Eugene Field's short story "The Werewolf." 🌕 This narrative unfolds a tale of love and lycanthropy, revolving around a haunting love triangle. The characters of Harold, Alfred, and the captivating Saxon maiden Yseult are entwined in a complex dance of emotions. Harold, cursed to carry the lineage of a werewolf, traces his ancestry back to the legendary Siegfried. With a unique twist on the traditional werewolf motif, Field's story takes us on a journey through love, curses, and the eerie legacy of lycanthropy.Meet the creative mind behind "The Werewolf," Eugene Field. 🖋️ Renowned as an American writer, Field's artistic journey flourished from his St. Louis roots. A master of children's poetry and humorous essays, he left an indelible mark on literature. Field's life led him through the realm of journalism, where his wit shone in his articles. His legacy extends beyond his words, with statues, parks, and institutions honoring his influence. Join us in exploring the life of Eugene Field and his captivating tale of "The Werewolf."#EugeneField #TheWerewolf #LoveTriangle #Lycanthropy #SiegfriedLegacy #AmericanWriter #LiteraryLegacy #CreativeMind #LiteraryTale #LoveAndCurses New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 221 - Whitewash and The Empty Berth by Rose Macauley  Thu, 31 Aug 2023 <p>Thank you to Jay Rothermel for suggesting I read these stories. You can read his take on them here:[https://jayrothermel.substack.com/p/two-stories-by-rose-macaulay-1881]Dame Emilie Rose Macaulay, born on August 1, 1881, in Rugby, Warwickshire, England, emerged as a distinctive figure in 20th-century literature. The daughter of George Campbell Macaulay, a classical scholar, and Grace Mary Conybeare, her upbringing was imbued with a scholarly aura that would lay the foundation for her intellectual pursuits. She attended Oxford High School for Girls before studying Modern History at Somerville College, Oxford University.Macaulay's literary journey was marked by a remarkable transformation. From her early struggles with depression, she transitioned into a prolific novelist known for her incisive commentary on society and relationships. This transition is especially fascinating when considered alongside her complex relationships, her private life, and her evolving religious and philosophical beliefs.Macaulay's religious journey was far from linear. Her exploration of faith went beyond the boundaries of traditional Christianity, reflecting a mystical sense of the Divine. While her spiritual convictions evolved, she did not return to the Anglican church until 1953. This complex relationship with religion is reflected in her works, where themes of Christianity often intertwined with skepticism and satire. Her novels, including "Potterism" (1920) and "Keeping Up Appearances," demonstrated her ability to dissect societal norms, often with a satirical edge.Her personal life was marked by a clandestine affair with Gerald O'Donovan, a lapsed Irish priest and fellow novelist. This intricate relationship spanned over two decades and remained a secret from many, even her closest friends. Macaulay's own ambivalence toward her sexuality added another layer of complexity to her identity, influencing her writing and the themes she explored.Macaulay's relationships within literary circles were equally captivating. She fostered connections with prominent writers such as Rupert Brooke and Elizabeth Bowen, often leaving her imprint on their narratives. Her role as a patron and supporter of emerging talents showcased her nurturing spirit, even as her own literary prowess continued to grow.Her impact extended to journalism, where she contributed to magazines like Time &amp; Tide and the Spectator. Her engagement with contemporary issues, including her support for the League of Nations, underscored her commitment to global harmony.Macaulay's work often grappled with the tension between individual freedom and societal responsibilities. Her novel "The World My Wilderness" (1950) exemplified this theme, as it navigated war-torn landscapes and internal struggles. The contrast between private introspection and public involvement became a defining motif in her literary explorations.Dame Emilie Rose Macaulay's legacy is a testament to the interplay of faith, identity, and relationships in shaping artistic expression. Her intricate journey through religious and philosophical landscapes, her intricate relationships with other literary figures, and her prolific body of work continue to captivate readers and scholars alike. As a figure who wove threads of complexity into the fabric of literature, she s New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 220 - Schalken The Painter by J Sheridan Le Fanu  Fri, 25 Aug 2023 <p>Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu Joseph Thomas Sheridan Le Fanu (1814-1873) was an Irish writer and one of the leading ghost story writers of the 19th century. Born into a literary family in Dublin, he studied law and became a journalist. Le Fanu's first published story appeared in 1838. In 1844, he married Susanna Bennett and had four children. Following his wife's death in 1858, Le Fanu withdrew from society for a period of time. However, during the 1860s and 1870s, he produced his most notable supernatural fiction, including the acclaimed short story collection "In a Glass Darkly" (1872) and the vampire novella "Carmilla" (1871). Le Fanu's ghost stories, such as "Green Tea," "The Familiar," and "Mr Justice Harbottle," earned him admiration from fellow writers like M.R. James. Although he also wrote novels, journalism, and poetry, Le Fanu's reputation predominantly rests on his chilling tales of the supernatural. He passed away in Dublin in 1873 at the age of 58. Today, Le Fanu is regarded as one of the pioneers and masters of supernatural horror fiction. His work greatly influenced subsequent writers, including Bram Stoker, who drew inspiration from Le Fanu's vampire story, "Carmilla."Schalken The Painter Analysis In "Schalken The Painter," Vanderhausen can be seen as a representation of the shadow archetype, embodying the dark, repressed, and sinister aspects of the characters Douw and Schalken. The shadow is a psychological concept in Jungian theory that represents the hidden, suppressed, and often undesirable aspects of the psyche. It holds the unacknowledged fears, desires, and weaknesses that individuals may project onto others.Full analysis and links herehttps://www.ghostpod.org/2023/07/15/schalken-the-painter-by-j-sheridan-le-fanu/ New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 219 - The House of The Dead Hand by Edith Wharton  Thu, 17 Aug 2023 <p>Edith Wharton was born Edith Newbold Jones on January 24, 1862, into a wealthy New York family. She was a prolific writer, known for her insightful and critical portrayal of the American upper class. Her most famous works include "The Age of Innocence," "Ethan Frome," and "The House of Mirth." Wharton was the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Literature in 1921. She was also a keen designer, traveler, and a dedicated supporter of French efforts during World War I, for which she was awarded the French Legion of Honor.The Story and Its Context: "The House of the Dead Hand" was published in 1904, a time when Wharton was beginning to establish herself as a serious writer. This was a period of significant personal and social change for Wharton. She was beginning to question the constraints of her privileged New York society, and these themes of societal constraints and personal freedom are evident in the story. The story also reflects Wharton's love for Italy and her deep knowledge of art and culture. "The House of the Dead Hand" by Edith Wharton is a compelling exploration of power dynamics, personal freedom, and the enduring influence of the past. The story centers around Miss Lombard, a woman trapped by her father's control and his obsession with a Leonardo da Vinci painting. Even after her father's death, she remains ensnared by his influence, symbolized by the painting she cannot sell. This narrative can be seen as a critique of patriarchal control, reflecting Wharton's own questioning of societal constraints. From a Freudian perspective, Miss Lombard's complex relationship with her father can be interpreted as a manifestation of the Elektra complex. The story also incorporates elements of Jungian psychology, with the painting serving as a powerful symbol of the unconscious. Wharton's narrative structure effectively builds tension, foreshadows dramatic events, and delivers a chilling twist, leaving a lasting impression of Miss Lombard's despair and entrapment. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 217 - The New Catacomb by Arthur Conan Doyle  Thu, 10 Aug 2023 <p>Arthur Conan Doyle's "The New Catacomb" is a chilling exploration of the themes of revenge, betrayal, and obsession, all set against the haunting backdrop of Rome's ancient catacombs. With its strong atmospheric build-up and a shocking climax, the story delivers a compelling narrative, though it falls short in terms of character development and narrative clarity.Conan Doyle masterfully employs the theme of revenge, manifest in Burger's calculated plot against his friend and rival Kennedy. It's an example of karma, with Kennedy becoming the victim of the same callous behavior he displayed towards Mary Saunderson, Burger's fiancée. Burger's obsession with his revenge plot, which he meticulously executes under the guise of archaeological discovery, adds another layer of complexity to his character.Betrayal is a constant undercurrent in this tale. Kennedy's betrayal of Mary Saunderson and, by extension, Burger, sets the stage for the dramatic climax, while Burger's act of leaving Kennedy alone in the catacomb is a striking mirror image of this betrayal. The irony of Kennedy, the heartbreaker, accusing Burger of mistreating Mary Saunderson is not lost on the reader and adds an interesting dynamic to the plot.The story excels in creating a palpable sense of claustrophobia and tension within the catacomb's dark confines. However, the intricacies of the catacomb's layout can become confusing, causing disorientation and detracting from the overall narrative experience.One of the strengths of this story lies in the surprising revelation about Mary Saunderson's engagement, which adds a twist to the narrative. This unexpected element of surprise showcases Conan Doyle's ability to keep readers on their toes.The characterization, however, leaves room for improvement. While Kennedy is convincingly portrayed as an obsessed but callous archaeologist, his motivations remain unclear, making him a less sympathetic protagonist. Similarly, Burger's vengeful rigidness, though compelling, could benefit from additional depth.The ending, while providing a neat closure with Burger's false newspaper story, also seems to tie the narrative too abruptly. Further exploration of Mary Saunderson's perspective would have added a valuable dimension to the story.In conclusion, "The New Catacomb," while not Conan Doyle's most nuanced work in terms of character development, remains an engaging short story. Its gripping narrative, marked by an atmospheric setting and a plot filled with revenge, betrayal, and irony, ensures an entertaining read. The story's major strengths lie in its sense of atmosphere and suspense, while its character development and narrative clarity could use some refinement. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 215 - All Hallows by Walter de La Mare  Thu, 27 Jul 2023 <p>Walter de La Mare (1873-1956) was an English poet, novelist, and short story writer known for his imaginative and evocative works. Born on April 25, 1873, in London, de La Mare began writing poetry and short stories during the 1890s while working as a bookkeeper. Despite not being a regular churchgoer, he held strong cultural Christianity and drew upon biblical themes and imagery in his writing.De La Mare's literary career took off with the publication of his first major work, the poetry collection "Songs of Childhood" in 1902. This collection showcased his romantic sensibilities, emphasizing intuition, deep emotion, and spiritual truths often associated with childhood. His poetic style was marked by rich imagery, lyrical language, and a sense of mystery. De La Mare's work gained recognition for its exploration of the supernatural and the depths of the human psyche. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 214 - An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street by J S Le Fanu  Thu, 20 Jul 2023 <p>Prepare for a chilling journey as we delve into the eerie world of Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's "An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street." This Victorian ghost story, set in a haunted house in Dublin, is a masterclass in suspense and terror. Two medical students move into an old house, only to be plagued by nightmares and haunted by the apparition of a cruel old man. As the terror escalates, they must confront the sinister legacy that lingers within the house's walls. Le Fanu's ghost is not a typical Victorian specter seeking justice, but a malevolent entity that continues to inflict harm even after death. This departure from the norm adds a unique twist to the tale, making it a standout in the genre. Le Fanu's view of the world as chaotic and unpredictable is reflected in his portrayal of the supernatural. In his universe, the supernatural is not a force for justice or equilibrium, but a source of further chaos and violence. Join us for a captivating narration of one of the most compelling ghost stories of the Victorian era. Will the students escape the horrors of Aungier Street? Tune in to find out.LinksMy new book: The Poisoned Rose (affiliate)https://amzn.to/3ro9StDTourlough Conmee's Dublin Dialect Channelhttps://www.youtube.com/@dublindialect3168My Late Night Sleep Radio Channelhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCprCE02DXiC1f3chbtnZFqQ New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 213 - Negotium Perambulans by E. F. Benson  Thu, 13 Jul 2023 <p>Prepare to be captivated by E.F. Benson's haunting tale, 'Negotium Perambulans.' Join us as we journey into the depths of a mysterious fishing village in West Cornwall, where supernatural forces lurk in the shadows. In this chilling story, a young man's return to his childhood home unearths dark secrets and encounters with a malevolent creature known as 'Negotium Perambulans.' With elements of Gothic horror and psychological suspense, this atmospheric narrative explores themes of sin, punishment, and the blurred boundaries between the natural and the supernatural. Join us for a spine-tingling reading that will leave you questioning the nature of evil itself.  New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 211 - The Horror of The Heights by Arthur Conan Doyle  Thu, 29 Jun 2023 <p>Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was a renowned British writer and physician, best known for creating the famous detective character Sherlock Holmes. He was born on May 22, 1859, in Edinburgh, Scotland, to Charles Altamont Doyle and Mary Foley Doyle. Doyle's early education took place at the Jesuit preparatory school of Hodder Place and Stonyhurst College. Later, he studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh and graduated in 1881. After completing his medical studies, Conan Doyle worked as a ship's doctor on various voyages, including a whaling expedition to the Arctic. He also served as a surgeon on a British steamship traveling to West Africa. These experiences provided him with a rich source of inspiration for his future writing. Conan Doyle's career as a writer took off when he began publishing short stories and novels. His most notable creation, Sherlock Holmes, made his first appearance in the novel "A Study in Scarlet" in 1887. The character of Holmes, with his keen powers of observation and deductive reasoning, quickly became immensely popular among readers. Sherlock Holmes' popularity led Conan Doyle to write numerous stories and novels featuring the detective and his loyal companion, Dr. John Watson. The adventures of Sherlock Holmes, including classics like "The Hound of the Baskervilles" and "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes," made Conan Doyle one of the most widely read and celebrated authors of his time. Despite his success with the Sherlock Holmes stories, Conan Doyle felt constrained by the detective's popularity and wished to focus on more serious literary work. In an attempt to distance himself from Holmes, he famously killed off the character in the story "The Final Problem." However, due to public outcry and popular demand, Conan Doyle eventually resurrected Holmes in later stories. Apart from his detective fiction, Conan Doyle also wrote historical novels, science fiction, plays, and non-fiction works on a variety of subjects. He was a prolific writer, producing over fifty books, countless short stories, and numerous articles throughout his career. In addition to his literary pursuits, Conan Doyle was deeply interested in spiritualism and the supernatural. He became a prominent advocate for spiritualism, even participating in seances and investigating alleged paranormal phenomena. This interest often brought him into conflict with skeptics and critics. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's contributions to literature and popular culture were widely recognized during his lifetime. In 1902, he was knighted by King Edward VII for his services as a volunteer army doctor during the Boer War. Conan Doyle passed away on July 7, 1930, at the age of 71, leaving behind a rich legacy of detective fiction and captivating storytelling that continues to captivate readers worldwide. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 210 - The Room In The Tower by E F Benson (2023 Recording)  Sat, 24 Jun 2023 <p>I've done this terrifying story by E F Benson before, but that was in 2019 and the sound wasn't great. Thanks to my supporters, I have much better sound equpiment now and I hope I'm a better narrator. I hope you like itIn this edge-of-your-seat episode, Tony Walker plunges into the sinister world of E.F. Benson's haunting story. Our protagonist, an unnamed young man, is plagued by an eerie recurring nightmare. In his dream, he visits a friend's foreboding home, inhabited by an ever-changing roster of silent and grim figures. Foremost among them is the unsettling Mrs. Stone, who persistently assigns him a room in the tower - a room that fills him with an indescribable dread. As the characters in the dream grow older and more bizarre over time, the terror continues to twist and turn. But the real question remains: What truly lurks in the room in the tower? Why does it inspire such fear? New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 209 - The Deadfall by Ted Hughes  Thu, 22 Jun 2023 <p>Thanks to Gavin Critchley for sponsoring this episode!Ted Hughes (1930-1998) was an English poet and writer who is widely regarded as one of the most important and influential poets of the 20th century. He was born on August 17, 1930, in Mytholmroyd, Yorkshire, England. Hughes had a deep connection with nature from an early age, which played a significant role in his poetry. He attended Mexborough Grammar School and later won a scholarship to study English at Pembroke College, Cambridge. During his time at Cambridge, he met fellow poet Sylvia Plath, whom he married in 1956. In 1957, Hughes' first collection of poetry, "The Hawk in the Rain," was published to critical acclaim. The collection established him as a major poetic voice and set the tone for his subsequent work. His poetry was often marked by its visceral and powerful imagery, exploring themes of nature, myth, and the human experience. Hughes and Plath had two children together before their marriage ended in separation in 1962 and later in divorce in 1963. Tragically, Plath took her own life in 1963. The events surrounding their relationship and Plath's suicide deeply affected Hughes and became a central theme in his work. Hughes served as the Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1984 until his death in 1998. Throughout his career, he published numerous collections of poetry, including "Wodwo" (1967), "Crow" (1970), and "Birthday Letters" (1998), which explored his relationship with Plath. His work often drew inspiration from mythology, folklore, and the natural world, and he had a distinctive and powerful voice that resonated with readers and fellow poets. In addition to his poetry, Hughes also wrote plays, prose, and children's literature. His most famous children's book is "The Iron Man" (1968), which has been adapted into various forms, including a stage play and an animated film. Ted Hughes received numerous awards and honors for his work, including the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry in 1974 and the T. S. Eliot Prize for Poetry in 1998. His contribution to English literature continues to be celebrated, and his poetry remains influential to this day. Sadly, Ted Hughes passed away on October 28, 1998, in London, England, but his legacy as one of the most significant poets of the 20th century lives on. Regenerate response New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 208 - The Golden Bough by David H Keller  Thu, 15 Jun 2023 <p>David H. Keller was an American author known for his contributions to science fiction and pulp magazines during the early 20th century. He was born on December 23, 1880, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Keller pursued a career in medicine and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a medical degree in 1903. He worked as a general practitioner, specializing in the treatment of mental disorders. Despite his medical profession, Keller had a strong passion for writing. He began his literary career by submitting stories to various pulp magazines, where he gained recognition for his unique blend of science fiction, horror, and fantasy elements. Keller's writing often explored psychological and sociological themes, displaying his background in medicine and his interest in human behavior. In 1928, Keller published one of his most famous works, a novella titled "The Revolt of the Pedestrians." The story depicted a future society where automobiles ruled, and pedestrians were marginalized. It was highly regarded for its social commentary and futuristic vision. Keller continued to write and publish numerous short stories, novelettes, and novellas throughout his career, earning him a dedicated following. One of Keller's notable contributions to the science fiction genre was his series of short stories featuring the character T.H.E. Cat. T.H.E. Cat, an acronym for The Human Electro, was a scientist with the ability to transfer his consciousness into different bodies. These stories often explored ethical and philosophical questions related to identity and consciousness. Keller's writing career slowed down in the 1940s and 1950s as he faced personal and financial challenges. He struggled with health issues and experienced difficulties in finding publishers for his work. Despite these setbacks, Keller's influence on the science fiction genre remained significant, as his stories often delved into psychological and societal aspects that were ahead of their time. David H. Keller passed away on July 13, 1966, in Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, leaving behind a legacy as an early pioneer of science fiction and a writer who explored the human condition through his imaginative tales. While his work may have been overlooked by mainstream literary circles, Keller's contributions to the genre continue to be appreciated by science fiction enthusiasts and scholars who recognize his unique voice and forward-thinking ideas. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 207 - Ringing The Changes by Robert Aickman  Thu, 08 Jun 2023 <p>Robert AickmanRobert Aickman was a British author best known for his highly influential and distinctive contributions to the genre of supernatural fiction. Born on June 27, 1914, in London, England, Aickman spent much of his life exploring his passion for writing and exploring the depths of the human psyche through his unique brand of storytelling.Aickman's early life was marked by a fascination with the strange and macabre. As a child, he developed an interest in ghost stories and the supernatural, which would later become significant themes in his works. He attended Highgate School in London and went on to study law at Cambridge University, although he eventually chose not to pursue a legal career.Instead, Aickman became deeply involved in various literary endeavors. He co-founded the Inland Waterways Association, an organization dedicated to preserving Britain's canal systems, and served as its chairman for many years. This passion for the waterways and their mysteries would find its way into some of his stories, where canals often serve as eerie and unsettling settings.Aickman's writing career began in the late 1940s, and he initially focused on non-fiction. He worked as a critic, reviewer, and editor, writing for magazines such as the London Mercury and the Times Literary Supplement. During this time, he became acquainted with many prominent literary figures, including J.R.R. Tolkien, who became a friend and a source of inspiration.However, it was in the realm of short stories that Aickman truly made his mark. His first collection, "We Are for the Dark," was published in 1951, followed by several other collections over the years. Aickman's stories are characterized by their atmospheric prose, subtle psychological horror, and an emphasis on the uncanny and the unknown. His tales often feature ordinary characters thrust into extraordinary and unsettling situations, where the line between reality and the supernatural becomes blurred.Aickman's writing gained critical acclaim and a devoted following, particularly among fellow authors and aficionados of weird fiction. His unique style and narrative approach set him apart from other writers of his time. His works have been praised for their ability to evoke a sense of unease and disquietude, exploring the hidden fears and desires lurking beneath the surface of everyday life.Although Aickman's writing career was relatively short-lived, spanning roughly three decades, his impact on the genre cannot be overstated. He received numerous accolades for his contributions, including the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1981. Despite this recognition, Aickman's work remained somewhat underappreciated during his lifetime, but his reputation has grown steadily in the years since his death.Robert Aickman passed away on February 26, 1981, in London, leaving behind a rich legacy of unsettling and enigmatic tales. His stories continue to captivate readers with their haunting atmosphere, intricate subtleties, and exploration of the strange and inexplicable. Aickman's unique vision and distinctive voice ensure his enduring place as one of the most original and influential authors in the realm of supernatural fiction. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 205 - The House With The Brick-Kiln by E. F. Benson  Thu, 25 May 2023 <p>n this classic ghost story by E.F. Benson, two friends rent an idyllic country house for a month of fishing, only to find themselves haunted by a malevolent presence. As the strange occurrences escalate, they begin to uncover the dark secrets of the house and its former occupants. This eerie tale will keep you on the edge of your seat until the very end. Narrated with audiobook quality, this reading of "The House With The Brick-Kiln" is perfect for fans of classic horror and ghost stories. Sit back, relax, and let the haunting tale unfold in your ears. Hashtags:#horror #ghoststory #audiobook #classicliterature #EFBenson #hauntedhouse #spooky #creepy #reading #narration #horrorfiction #audiobooks New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 204 - Madam Crowl's Ghost by J S Le Fanu  Thu, 18 May 2023 <p>Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu was an Irish writer born on August 28, 1814, in Dublin, Ireland. He was the third son of a Protestant family with French origins. Le Fanu received his early education at Trinity College, Dublin, but left before finishing his degree to pursue a career in journalism. He quickly established himself as a successful writer, publishing stories in various magazines and newspapers. In the 1840s, Le Fanu began to focus more on fiction writing, and his works began to gain wider recognition. His most famous novel, "Uncle Silas," was published in 1864 and is considered a classic of Victorian Gothic literature. Other notable works include "In a Glass Darkly" and "Carmilla." Le Fanu's writing style was characterized by a strong sense of atmosphere and suspense, often incorporating supernatural elements. He was known for his ability to create vivid and memorable characters, particularly his strong female protagonists. Despite his success as a writer, Le Fanu's personal life was marked by tragedy. He lost his wife and infant daughter to childbirth complications, and his health began to decline in the late 1860s. He died on February 7, 1873, at the age of 58, leaving behind a legacy as one of Ireland's most important literary figures. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 202 - The Voice In The Night by William Hope Hodgson  Thu, 11 May 2023 <p>This episode features an audiobook reading of William Hope Hodgson's classic horror story, "The Voice in the Night." The story is set on a small sailing vessel in the North Pacific Ocean and centers around a mysterious voice calling out from the darkness. The audiobook reading is filled with suspense and tension, as the characters encounter strange and unsettling occurrences on a deserted island. Listeners will be transported to a world of terror and horror as they follow the story to its chilling conclusion.  #TheVoiceInTheNight, #horrorstory, #audiobook, and #WilliamHopeHodgson. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 201 - Honeysuckle Cottage by P. G. Wodehouse  Thu, 27 Apr 2023 <p>P. G. Wodehouse Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse, popularly known as P. G. Wodehouse, was a British humorist and author who was born on October 15, 1881, in Guildford, Surrey, England. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest comic writers in English literature and is best known for his humorous and cleverly written novels and short stories featuring the characters of Jeeves and Wooster, Psmith, and Blandings Castle. Wodehouse was the son of a British judge who worked in Hong Kong. His mother was a talented writer who encouraged his love of reading and writing. Wodehouse was educated at Dulwich College and later at the University of Oxford. However, he left the university without completing his degree and decided to pursue a career as a writer. Wodehouse started his writing career as a journalist and humorist for various magazines and newspapers, including Punch and The Strand Magazine. His first book, The Pothunters, was published in 1902, and he went on to publish over 90 books, including novels, collections of short stories, and plays. In 1914, Wodehouse moved to the United States, where he continued to write and became a popular figure in the literary and social circles of New York. During World War II, Wodehouse was living in France, and he was taken prisoner by the Germans. He spent several months in a detention camp and was later released, but the controversy surrounding his imprisonment caused him to leave England and move permanently to the United States. Throughout his career, Wodehouse's writing was celebrated for its wit, humor, and impeccable comic timing. His characters, such as the hapless Bertie Wooster and his valet Jeeves, became iconic figures in popular culture and are still widely recognized today. Wodehouse was awarded numerous honors during his lifetime, including knighthood in 1975, but he is perhaps best remembered for his contributions to the world of humorous literature. Wodehouse continued to write until his death on February 14, 1975, at the age of 93. Today, his works are still beloved by readers around the world and are considered timeless classics of English literature. Despite his immense popularity as a writer, Wodehouse was not immune to controversy. In particular, his decision to continue writing and publishing works during World War II while living in France was criticized by some as being unpatriotic. This controversy led Wodehouse to leave England and move permanently to the United States. Despite this controversy, Wodehouse continued to write and remained a prolific author throughout his life. He was married twice in his life, first to Ethel Wayman in 1914 and later to Ethel's former secretary, Edith de Selincourt, in 1947. It's true that P.G. Wodehouse never officially divorced Ethel Wayman, but after they separated in 1921, they essentially lived separate lives. In 1947, Wodehouse married his second wife, Edith de Selincourt. Ethel Wayman was still alive at the time of their marriage, but she had been living in a psychiatric hospital for several years and was reportedly unable to communicate.  In 1914, Wayman married P.G. Wodehouse, who was working as a lyricist for musicals at the time. The couple had a turbulent marriage, and they separated in 1921, but they never officially divorced. After their separation, Wayman continued to work as an actress, appearing in films and on stage. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 200 - The Upper Berth by F. Marion Crawford  Thu, 20 Apr 2023 <p>Francis Marion Crawford was an American author and journalist who lived from 1854 to 1909. He was born in Bagni di Lucca, Italy, to a family of art connoisseurs and spent much of his childhood traveling throughout Europe. Crawford attended Harvard University for a year before leaving to pursue a career in writing.Crawford began his writing career as a journalist, working for several newspapers and magazines such as the New York Tribune and the Boston Evening Transcript. He wrote travel books and essays about his experiences living in Italy, and these early works were well received.In 1882, Crawford published his first novel, "Mr. Isaacs," which was a critical and commercial success. He went on to write over 40 novels, as well as numerous short stories, essays, and plays. Many of his works were set in Italy and drew on his experiences living there, including some of his best-known novels such as "Saracinesca," "Sant' Ilario," and "Casa Braccio."Aside from his success as a writer, Crawford was also descended from a long line of artists and writers. His grandfather, William Crawford, was an American portrait painter, and his great-grandfather, Gilbert Stuart, painted George Washington's portrait. Crawford's father, Thomas Crawford, was a successful sculptor who created several prominent public sculptures in the United States, including the statue of Freedom on top of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C.Crawford's novels explored complex themes such as love, betrayal, and social class, and his characters often struggled with their own personal demons, making them relatable to readers across time and place. Crawford was considered one of the leading writers of his day and was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He was awarded several honorary degrees from universities in the United States and Europe.Despite his success, Crawford was known for his private nature and his avoidance of public appearances. He was married twice and had four children. Crawford died in Sorrento, Italy, on April 9, 1909, at the age of 54. His works continue to be read and enjoyed today for their vivid depictions of Italian society, their engaging characters, and their ability to transport readers to other times and places.The Upper Berth"The Upper Berth" is a horror story by F. Marion Crawford, first published in 1886. One of the strengths of "The Upper Berth" is Crawford's ability to create a suspenseful and eerie atmosphere. He builds tension throughout the story, gradually revealing more and more about the strange happenings in Brisbane's cabin. The descriptions of the creaking ship, the eerie silence of the night, and the mysterious noises from the upper berth all add to the story's creepy atmosphere.However, one of the flaws of "The Upper Berth" is its reliance on clichés and stereotypes. The story includes many of the standard tropes of horror stories, such as the lone traveler in a strange place, the creepy sounds in the night, and the mysterious disappearance of previous passengers. Additionally, the story relies on stereotypes of sailors as rough and superstitious, which can be off-putting to modern readers.Overall, "The Upper Berth" is a well-written horror story that effectively creates a sense of suspense and unease. While it may rely on some clichés and stereotypes, it remains a classic example of the genre and is worth readi New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 199 - A Terribly Strange Bed by Wilkie Collins  Thu, 13 Apr 2023 <p>Step back in time to Victorian Paris, a city of mystery and intrigue, where danger lurks around every corner and secrets are hidden behind every closed door. In this podcast episode, you will be transported to the heart of the City of Lights, where a thrilling tale of suspense and intrigue awaits."A Terribly Strange Bed" is a little gem of a story, published in 1852 by the master of suspense himself, Wilkie Collins. The story follows the protagonist, who is bored of his usual respectable haunts and decides to venture into a low down gambling den, where he begins to win, and win, and win. However, as the night wears on, our protagonist finds himself caught up in a web of danger and intrigue that he could never have imagined. The stakes become higher and higher, until he finds himself in a situation where his very life is at risk.So, if you're in the mood for a thrilling tale of danger and intrigue, look no further than "A Terribly Strange Bed." This little gem of a story is sure to keep you on the edge of your seat, and remind you why Wilkie Collins is considered one of the greatest writers of the Victorian era. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 198 - The Repairer of Reputations by Robert W. Chambers  Thu, 30 Mar 2023 <p>In this episode, we delve into the dark and unsettling world of Robert W. Chambers' short story "The Repairer of Reputations." Join us as we explore the mind of an unreliable narrator, Hildred Castaigne, and his delusional quest for power and revenge. As we uncover the secrets of Castaigne's dystopian world and his belief in a cursed play called "The King in Yellow," we confront the disturbing and thought-provoking themes of madness, manipulation, and the fragility of reality. Buckle up for a journey into the unknown, as we dissect one of Chambers' most iconic and haunting stories. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 197 - The Mysterious Bride by James Hogg  Fri, 24 Mar 2023 <p>ames Hogg (1770-1835) was a Scottish poet, novelist, and essayist known for his work in the Romantic literary movement. He was born in the small village of Ettrick in the Scottish Borders, and his upbringing was marked by poverty and hardship. Hogg's father was a shepherd, and Hogg himself worked as a shepherd for much of his youth. However, he had a passion for literature and began writing poetry and prose at an early age. Despite his lack of formal education, Hogg was a talented writer, and he began to gain recognition for his work in the early 1800s. His first major publication was "The Mountain Bard" (1807), a collection of poems that celebrated the rural life and landscape of Scotland. This was followed by his most famous work, "The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner" (1824), a novel that explored themes of good and evil, religious fanaticism, and psychological horror. In addition to his writing, Hogg was known for his eccentric personality and his love of Scottish folklore and tradition. He was a close friend of other Scottish writers such as Walter Scott and Robert Burns, and he was a frequent visitor to literary salons and gatherings in Edinburgh. Despite his literary success, Hogg struggled with financial difficulties for much of his life. He continued to write and publish until his death in 1835, and he is remembered as one of Scotland's most important writers of the Romantic period. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->
  • 196 - Our Feathered Friends by Philip MacDonald  Fri, 17 Mar 2023 <p>Join The Classic Ghost Stories Podcast for a thrilling reading of 'Our Feathered Friends' by renowned British author Philip MacDonald. Originally published in 1931, this haunting tale takes place on a blistering hot summer's day, when a young couple ventures into the cool shade of an isolated forest and encounters an unexpected and terrifying phenomenon. The story's unexpected twists and turns are sure to keep you on the edge of your seat as you experience one of the masters of detective and mystery fiction at work. Don't miss this gripping short story, which hints at something unusual and chilling lurking within the depths of the forest. New Patreon Request Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Support the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices<a rel="noreferrer nofollow noopener"></a></p> -->

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BBC Sounds - Categories - Horror & Supernatural

Horror & supernatural.

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A Pair of Hands by Arthur Quiller-Couch

When Miss Poulton rents a house she does not know that it comes with an unseen helper

  • 28 Mar 1982

ghost stories podcast uk

5. Bombers' Moon by Lucy Kirkwood

The creepy raconteur tells of something evil stalking stranded soldiers in Afghanistan.

  • 01 Feb 2009

ghost stories podcast uk

Episode 9: An Ancient Evil

Danny Robins returns with a terrifying bonus episode recorded in front of a live audience.

  • 06 Feb 2023

ghost stories podcast uk

Thorn has confirmed the shocking truth about Damien.

  • 13 Oct 2017

ghost stories podcast uk

4. The Work of Evil

Can a sceptical academic resist reading a book that curses anyone that dares open it?

  • 13 Oct 1961

ghost stories podcast uk

Ep 10 - The Haunter of the Dark

Has the Lovecraft team finally found the Church of Starry Wisdom?

  • 16 Oct 2023

ghost stories podcast uk

15: The Film

The finale of Daisy Johnson's ghost story series set on the Fens, read by Sara Kestelman.

  • 27 Dec 2020

ghost stories podcast uk

Introducing... The Witch Farm

Danny Robins introduces his investigation into the haunting of a remote Welsh farmhouse.

  • 18 Oct 2022

ghost stories podcast uk

1: The Barrowbeck Survey

Maxine Peake kicks off ten chilling strange tales from the folk-horror author of The Loney

  • 30 Oct 2022

ghost stories podcast uk

The White People by Arthur Machen

Exploring the nature of good and evil - and sin's origins - via a teenager's diary.

  • 18 Mar 2007

ghost stories podcast uk

4. The Wound

Back from his voyage, the narrator sees a sinister green hand at his window.

  • 07 Sep 2007

ghost stories podcast uk

The celestial alignment is nigh. Can Mia stop Hendrick?

  • 07 Oct 2020

ghost stories podcast uk

It's Me Who Keeps the Bird's Heart Beating by Luke Sutherland

In this haunting tale, Regina overcomes muteness with some help from the afterlife...

  • 30 Dec 2010

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Night Terrors by Lizzie Nunnery

Victoria can't sleep at night. Then bad dreams haunt her waking hours.

  • 29 Dec 2011

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15. The White Hill

Brigid and Pryderi must defeat Roisin and fulfil King Bran's prophecy.

  • 01 Jul 2021

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5. Tuesday's Child

Tuesday grows up assuming her mother abandoned her, despite the voices in her dreams.

  • 03 Jan 2014

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Session Six: When We Don’t Come Back

Thank you for completing Sink treatment. You’ve done so well.

  • 02 Dec 2020

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Introducing DEADHOUSE

An unnerving trilogy of horror shorts. Meet yourself in the DEADHOUSE.

  • 22 Oct 2021

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1. Doppelgänger

Noa wishes she could be in two places at once, but will she regret it?

  • 04 May 2022

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Welcome to Murmurs

Ten mind-altering tales from some of the best new drama podcast writers.

  • 25 Nov 2019
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  • Darkness Prevails Podcast | TRUE Horror Stories
  • A Truly Haunted Podcast
  • Real Ghost Stories Online
  • Real Hauntings Real Ghost Stories
  • The Grave Talks
  • Something Scary
  • We Need To Talk About Ghosts
  • Two Girls One Ghost
  • Deadly Debbie's Ghost Stories
  • New Ghost Stories
  • Ghosts In The Burbs
  • Ghosts In The Valley
  • Historically Haunted
  • Creepy Classics
  • Shadows at the Door: The Podcast
  • On A Dark, Cold Night
  • Nightshade Diary
  • Pleasing Terrors
  • Haunted Happenstance
  • The Ghost Story Book Club
  • Ghost Stories | A Rolls-Royce Podcast
  • This Podcast is Haunted
  • Macabre at Midnight
  • True Ghost Stories From Real People
  • The Daily Ghost
  • r/nosleep Reddit nosleep scary horror ghost stories
  • Southern Ghost Stories
  • The Darker Side of Life Podcast
  • Wisdom Ghost Stories
  • Scary Obsessed
  • The Ghost Story Guys
  • Spook Castle
  • Personalized Erotic Ghost Stories
  • The Ghost Stories of E F Benson, read by Richard Crowest
  • Ghost Stories the Podcast
  • It's Just A Ghost
  • When You Wake

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Here are 40 Best Ghost Story Podcasts worth listening to in 2024

1. Darkness Prevails Podcast | TRUE Horror Stories

Darkness Prevails Podcast | TRUE Horror Stories

2. A Truly Haunted Podcast

A Truly Haunted Podcast

3. Real Ghost Stories Online

Real Ghost Stories Online

4. Real Hauntings Real Ghost Stories

Real Hauntings Real Ghost Stories

5. The Grave Talks

The Grave Talks

6. Something Scary

Something Scary

7. We Need To Talk About Ghosts

We Need To Talk About Ghosts

8. Two Girls One Ghost

Two Girls One Ghost

9. Deadly Debbie's Ghost Stories

Deadly Debbie's Ghost Stories

10. New Ghost Stories

New Ghost Stories

11. Ghosts In The Burbs

Ghosts In The Burbs

12. Ghosts In The Valley

Ghosts In The Valley

13. Historically Haunted

Historically Haunted

14. Creepy Classics

Creepy Classics

15. Shadows at the Door: The Podcast

Shadows at the Door: The Podcast

16. Ghostly

Ghostly

17. On A Dark, Cold Night

On A Dark, Cold Night

18. Nightshade Diary

Nightshade Diary

19. Pleasing Terrors

Pleasing Terrors

20. Haunted Happenstance

Haunted Happenstance

21. Cthulhu

Cthulhu

22. The Ghost Story Book Club

The Ghost Story Book Club

23. Ghost Stories | A Rolls-Royce Podcast

Ghost Stories | A Rolls-Royce Podcast

24. This Podcast is Haunted

This Podcast is Haunted

25. Macabre at Midnight

Macabre at Midnight

26. True Ghost Stories From Real People

True Ghost Stories From Real People

27. The Daily Ghost

The Daily Ghost

28. r/nosleep Reddit nosleep scary horror ghost stories

r/nosleep Reddit nosleep scary horror ghost stories

29. Southern Ghost Stories

Southern Ghost Stories

30. The Darker Side of Life Podcast

The Darker Side of Life Podcast

31. Wisdom Ghost Stories

Wisdom Ghost Stories

32. Scary Obsessed

Scary Obsessed

33. The Ghost Story Guys

The Ghost Story Guys

34. Spook Castle

Spook Castle

35. Personalized Erotic Ghost Stories

Personalized Erotic Ghost Stories

36. The Ghost Stories of E F Benson, read by Richard Crowest

The Ghost Stories of E F Benson, read by Richard Crowest

37. Mirrors

Mirrors

38. Ghost Stories the Podcast

Ghost Stories the Podcast

39. It's Just A Ghost

It&#39;s Just A Ghost

40. When You Wake

When You Wake

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The Classic Ghost Stories Podcast

The Classic Ghost Stories Podcast

A Ghost Story Every Week

A Spooky Story Every Week

ghost stories podcast uk

The Podcast

The Classic Ghost Stories Podcast is a long running audiobook style podcast running on all podcast providers and now on YouTube .  You can listen as Tony Walker, the host, reads out a vintage ghost story, horror story or weird tale at least each week. Sometimes he presents his own work.

This podcast has become a curated library of  the masters of the genre such as M. R. James, Algernon Blackwood, Bram Stoker, Shirley Jackson, H P Lovecraft, Edith Wharton, August Derleth and many others.

The Classic Ghost Stories Podcast is a weekly dose of spine-chilling thrills. Immerse yourself in vintage ghost stories from the pens of master storytellers, both living and deceased, and sometimes even undead. Discover the haunting beauty of classic tales, as well as the eerie familiarity of modern horror stories. Each episode is a new journey into the unknown, a chance to explore the supernatural and experience the inexplicable.

Get exclusive access to even more hair-raising stories on Tony Walker’s Substack. From ghost stories, to classic ghost tales and eerie legends, to classic ghost story play downloads, the stories podcast will keep you captivated.

Add the Classic Ghost Stories Podcast to your playlist, and be unable to resist the urge to listen each week. Whether you’re sipping coffee, or stargazing, each episode will leave you feeling a bit uneasy, constantly on the edge of your seat. The best part? There’s always more to come, with new episodes added regularly. So, what are you waiting for?

Don’t wait to play and download each episode, and join the community of ghost story lovers. The classic ghost stories and tales will leave you wanting more.

Subscribe today, and experience the horrors, literature and the art of storytelling, like never before!

ghost stories podcast uk

“The Wise are silent, the Foolish speak, and children are thus led astray.”  — Algernon Blackwood

ghost stories podcast uk

by Shirley Jackson

ghost stories podcast uk

Another haunted house story to continue our series. This time it is all strange and unnerving: odd women who live in the tower, visitors who turn out not to be real. Shirley Jackson writes another magnificent supernatural story.

My Niece Alison

By tony walker.

ghost stories podcast uk

One of my own.  This story comes from my Horror Stories for Halloween collection. It takes place in a remote Welsh farmhouse on a windy, wet night. Just the sort of place you might expect to encounter an evil spirit.

The Night Wire

By h f arnold.

ghost stories podcast uk

Well after midnight in a newsroom high above the city, a strange story comes tip-tapping in down the night wire. John Morgan, the night wire expert, turns the morse code into words, and the words reveal a mystery.

The Turn of the Screw

By henry james.

ghost stories podcast uk

The Turn of the Screw is the book behind the Netflix series The Haunting of Bly Manor. Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw is said to be the best ghost story ever written. We have haunted house in Victorian England, weird children, an innocent young woman.

~Don’t Look Now~

By daphne du maurier.

ghost stories podcast uk

Don’t Look Now is a short story by Daphne Du Maurier that was made into the 1973 classic horror movie by Nicolas Roeg. This is a full length audiobook version of the classic tale of mysterious Venice.

Buy My Ghost Story Books!

Since I fell out with Amazon, they have blocked my books, but you can still order them through your local bookshop.

I also have an Etsy Store where you can buy my books directly from me and get them signed!

The Classic Ghost Stories Podcast Etsy Book Shop

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  • FILM & TV

11 Best Ghost Story Podcasts to Send a Chill Down Your Spine

Did you hear that?

ghost story podcasts

  • Photo Credit: MontyLov / Unsplash

There's no denying the thrill of a good ghost story. And when it comes to learning about the specters and spooks that haunt our mortal realm, there's something extra special—and extra spine-tingling—about the spoken word. From campfire tales to creepy radio shows, the spoken word has long served as a medium to share spooky tales and revel in the thrill of being scared. That tradition is alive and well today, thanks in no small part to the thriving world of ghost story podcasts.

Related: 13 Best Horror Podcasts to Give You the Chills  

And with the days growing darker and a biting chill in the air, now's the perfect time to settle in for a spooky audio journey to the other side. Below are the best ghost story podcasts you can listen to right now. Whether you're a committed skeptic or diehard believer with your own ghost stories to share, we're sure you'll find a scary good listen in the selections below. Some of these ghost story podcasts are fiction while others relate real-life encounters with the paranormal. All of them have one thing in common: ghosts!

Want more ghost story podcasts? Sign up for The Lineup’s newsletter, and get our creepiest recommendations delivered straight to your inbox.

Anything Ghost

The name says it all: Anything Ghost is a podcast dedicated to all things ghostly. Since 2006, the Anything Ghost crew has been sharing stories of ghostly encounters. You don't need to be worried about them running out of ideas, either, because none of these stories are fictional. Each terrifying tale Anything Ghost presents centers on a real-life account, a historical haunting, or a ghostly mystery.

Related: 20 Ghost Books to Haunt Your Days (and Nights)  

Haunted Places

Ghost stories have at least one thing in common with real estate agents: an emphasis on location, location, location. From iconic haunted houses to more unusual haunted locales , a sense of place is critical to a good ghost story. That’s certainly true of the tales told in Haunted Places , a podcast dedicated to the scary spots from around the world that seem to cast some kind of spectral spell. The creepiest part: All of the places discussed on this weekly podcast are real. Whether the hauntings are, too, is for you to decide—if you dare!

Related: 9 Haunted House Books That Will Leave You Sleeping with One Eye Open  

Jim Harold's Campfire

Since 2005, "Paranormal Podcast Guy" Jim Harold has been delighting listeners with tales of the strange and unexplained. Jim Harold's Campfire is dedicated to nonfiction tales of all kinds of creepy phenomena. Ghosts are just one part of the paranormal equation; with around 400 episodes available, you'll have your pick of the best episodes focused on ghosts.

Related: 26 Blood-Curdling Books for Fans of American Horror Story  

Listen with the Lights On

The northeastern United States is full of strange history and spooky stories. In Listen with the Lights On , NPR station WAMC Northeast shares real-life stories and creepy histories set against the backdrop of New England and Upstate New York. You don't have to live in Albany to listen to Listen with the Lights On , though—the radio show is available as a podcast, too.

Related: Hans Holzer: America’s First Ghost Hunter  

The Black Tapes

The Black Tapes is a horror fiction serial for the podcasting age. It employs the style of nonfiction podcast hits like Serial , presenting a fictional story as if it were a real-life narrative. At the center of the story are the records of Dr. Richard Strand, a paranormal investigator and “evangelical skeptic” who made a life's work out of debunking paranormal reports. He didn't finish, though, and his unsolved cases—the so-called "Black Tapes"—become a source of obsession for the podcast's host Alex Reagan. As Alex searches for the truth, she transforms into a character in what turns out to be a very spooky series of ghost stories.

Last Podcast on the Left

Some of the podcasts on this list feature horror fiction, while others examine real-life mysteries and paranormal phenomena. Last Podcast on the Left does both. This is a podcast for people who are obsessed with ghosts and the paranormal, and who enjoy a good ghost story as much as they enjoy a report of a real-life haunting or ghost-hunting expedition.

Related: 12 True Crime Books for Hardcore Fans of Last Podcast on the Left  

Lore needs no introduction. Aaron Mahnke's spooky podcast is a fan favorite, and for good reason: It's a seemingly inexhaustible source of spooky folklore, creepy urban legends , and unsettling accounts of real-life run-ins with the paranormal. Mahnke's delivery and in-depth research really make each story memorable. The chills come with a nice serving of folklore and culture, too, which means that you can count on these episodes to edify as well as terrify!

Related: 13 Terrifying Books About Real-Life Hauntings  

The Moonlit Road

The Moonlit Road takes its name from a short story by acclaimed American writer Ambrose Bierce . This is a podcast where Gothic horror meets Southern Gothic (and so much more): The Moonlit Road is obsessed with spooky Southern stories, including short fiction, folktales, urban legends, regional myths, and more. Though not limited to ghosts, this podcast has more than enough ghost stories to satisfy your cravings.

Real Ghost Stories Online

If you just can't get enough ghost stories, then you should subscribe to Real Ghost Stories Online . Like the other ghost story podcasts on this list, Real Ghost Stories Online is full of spooky tales—but unlike many of our other picks, you'll never have to wait a long time between episodes of Real Ghost Stories Online . This ongoing podcast updates daily, so there's always something new to listen to. For the voracious consumer of ghost stories, this inexhaustible podcast is a must.

Related: 13 More True Ghost Stories to Read in the Dark  

Created by New York City NPR station WNYC, Spooked is a spin-off of the show Snap Judgment that focuses entirely on scary stories and encounters with the paranormal. As just like Snap Judgment , these stories are all true—with an emphasis placed on first-hand accounts. The featured stories in Spooked are told by the people who experienced them. Many of Spooked 's contributors, according to NPR's description of the show, "can barely believe" the otherworldly episode that happened to them. 

Related: Spooked: A Paranormal Podcast That Dares You to Confront the Unknown  

Unexplained

As the name suggests, Unexplained is all about strange occurrences that have yet to be explained—and those that may never be explained. Mysterious real-life events are the oft-frightening focus of this podcast, so you can expect to hear plenty of ghost stories in the show's bi-weekly installments.

Related: 12 Dark and Creepy Podcasts You Can Listen to Right Now  

Featured image: MontyLov / Unsplash  

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  • Oct 10 2023
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An aerial view of the Doce River – which was flooded with toxic waste after an iron ore mine’s dam burst.

The disaster you could see from space: how a podcast went inside an eco catastrophe

Nineteen dead, hundreds homeless and 700,000 taking legal action. Eco true-crime podcast Dead River delves into a Brazilian dam’s collapse – and how it’s led to the UK’s biggest ever class-action lawsuit

I listen to Dead River while running home from a quick dip, surrounded by fag butts and Lucozade bottles, in the brown stretch of what Thames Water describes as “our most important water source”. But as I listen to the descriptions of 43.7mn cubic metres of toxic, brown mud – the “tailings” of just one Brazilian iron ore mine near Mariana – filling more than 645km (400 miles) of watercourses, from the collapsed Fundão dam all the way to the Atlantic Ocean, I realise that, really, I know nothing about dead rivers.

While it is billed as a true crime podcast, Dead River encompasses everything from environmental destruction to colonial history, family tragedy to perilous chase scenes, indigenous anthropology to the sheer brutal fact of what a river carpeted with a million dead fish looks like. It tells the story of Brazil’s worst environmental disaster . According to this podcast, the collapse of the Fundão tailings dam in 2015, which stored the toxic byproducts of iron ore mining, created more immediate devastation even than the continuous felling of the Amazonian rainforest for cattle ranching. It also killed 19 people, made hundreds homeless, and was so vast that it could be seen from space. More than eight years later, those responsible have still not been fully held to account. This has led to the largest class-action lawsuit ever held in the UK , with more than 700,000 plaintiffs seeking justice from Anglo-Australian mining giant BHP through the English and Welsh courts. The company denies the claims against it.

“This is one of the most multilayered, complex, fascinating stories I’ve ever been part of,” says biologist Liz Bonnin. She presents the podcast, and is perhaps best known for her appearances on wildlife television series such as Our Changing Planet and Blue Planet Live.

“When the producer Pulama Kaufman approached me, they were very quick to say they wanted to tell the story of the systemic failures of the mining companies, but also the Indigenous people, their culture and how it has affected them. I was immediately on board.”

In the podcast, there are interviews with residents of nearby village Bento Rodrigues, which was destroyed by the deluge of poisonous sludge that ran, unstoppably, from the broken dam; there are accounts by Cristina Serra, whose book Tragédia em Mariana ultimately led to much of the investigation covered in the podcast; there are lyrical descriptions by local fishermen about what their connection to the land has meant over generations; and a look at how a team of lawyers, including the Welsh maverick Tom Goodhead, have taken on a legal battle against the owners of the dam: BHP and the Brazilian company Vale. Was Liz, I wondered, ever worried about how to present a story like this, without provoking the sort of ecological despair that can make even the most well-meaning listener turn away?

Liz Bonnin.

“The conclusion I’ve come to, after years of being immersed in these subjects in ways that have caused me quite a lot of distress is that we need to look at the root cause of those feelings of being overwhelmed,” Bonnin says over Zoom.

“We are constantly whacked across the head with news headlines that are filled with rape, murder, violence, war, despair. They’re so overwhelmingly depressing and harrowing that I think it plays a role in keeping people’s bandwidth small, so that they don’t have the capacity to take in a story like this.” Bonnin has her hand to her chest as she speaks. “But we have to lean into the discomfort, and understand the reality of what we’ve created as a global society, so we can all be part of the change.”

The podcast, Bonnin is keen to point out, also tells beautiful, emotive stories of the people on the ground and their connection to nature. It introduces us to a range of people she calls heroes, who are fighting for what is just and fair and right – environmental law organisations like the Good Law Project, Friends of the Earth and Pogust Goodhead, that are winning cases, taking businesses to court, and holding governments to account. There are also people in this story who act more like action movie heroes; people such as Paula Geralda Alvez who, immediately on hearing that the dam had broken, leapt on to her motorbike and sped through the forest, pursued by a wave of toxic brown filth, to warn local villagers and residents.

“Paula was so connected to community that her first thought was to save it; at the risk to her own life,” says Bonnin. “Then there are the indigenous people we mention in the podcast, from the Krenak to the Tupiniquim; their homes have been destroyed, their livelihoods, but also with the loss of their river they have lost their sense of identity, and their spirituality. I know it will spark feelings in people just to hear how they speak about their land.”

For me, one of the most evocative images summoned by the podcast comes in the third episode, with acres and acres of stinking mud, full of ripped-up vegetation and dead animals, being transported to poorer neighbourhoods and dumped, creating a further cloud of toxic dust. It says so much about the role money always plays in who bears the brunt of environmental damage.

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“There were two moments when I had to stop,” says Bonnin. “One was reading out the names and ages of the people who died. The second was when I had to describe what happened to Pamela’s daughter.” Pamela Isabel’s daughter was one of the 19 people who died when the dam collapsed. “Pamela’s father told her that she did not need to see her daughter because she was unrecognisable.” The chemicals in the water and mud had started to rot the child’s body from the inside. “She was found entangled in the branches and for me that was symbolic of both the ferociousness of the accident but also the disregard for precious human life,” says Bonnin.

As I ran home from my own stretch of river, the smell of soil and slight whiff of TCP on my skin, I listened to a biologist on the podcast describe the aftereffects of the spill by saying: “It looks as if they threw the entire periodic table into the river.” So, I wonder, what can we, in Britain, with our poorly functioning, privatised water companies and environmentally reckless government, learn from this incident?

“As a biologist and a conservationist who has learned over the years how deeply interconnected and interdependent all life on Earth is, I do wonder how we can be so nationalistic about it,” says Bonnin. “To me, it’s so obvious that this matters to us. The natural world isn’t ours to exploit; it’s ours to protect so we can bloody well survive. For that reason alone we have a responsibility to understand and care about the damage we’re all causing as part of a system created by colonialism and capitalism. This isn’t a story about Brazil – it’s a story about all of us.”

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  • UK Politics

PMQs review: Liz Truss’s ghost is still haunting Rishi Sunak

The former PM’s comments proved a gift to Keir Starmer as he declared that the Tories had become the “political wing of the flat Earth society”.

By Rachel Cunliffe

ghost stories podcast uk

The word “febrile” gets tossed around a lot in parliament but there really isn’t another way to describe the mood in the chamber at today’s PMQs.

Nor was it just the party leaders who had turned up spoiling for a fight. MPs on both sides of the House were barely attempting to rein in their brays and boos from the backbenches. After last week’s chaotic scenes, there was a notable absence of calls of “order order” from the Speaker’s chair, making it at times almost impossible to hear what insults and accusations Keir Starmer and Rishi Sunak were actually hurling at each other.

Their lines of attack, though, were revealing. After weeks of PMQs-by-numbers, with Starmer focusing on divisions within the Conservative Party and the sense that Sunak “just doesn’t get it”, today the Labour leader came armed with fresh ammunition: Liz Truss .

He gleefully cited comments made by Truss about the “deep state” and her silence as the right-wing thug Tommy Robinson was praised at the Conservative Political Action Committee in the US last week, branding the Tories the “political wing of the flat Earth society”. When Conservative MPs groaned, Starmer quipped: “They made her prime minister, now they can’t bear talking about her.” Why, Starmer wanted to know, was the Prime Minister allowing Truss to stand as a Tory candidate?

Sunak had his comeback ready – and it was an aggressive (if predictable) one. “If he wants to talk about former leaders and predecessors, then the whole country knows his record,” the PM responded.

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Sunak regularly cites Starmer’s support of Jeremy Corbyn at PMQs, but usually when he does so it is a complete non-sequitur, a sign that he has no other answer for whatever topic he is being grilled on. Today, though, with Starmer honing in on Truss, Sunak had a point. And the roars from the benches behind him suggest the divided Tory party can at least come together on this.

Why did Starmer choose to open himself up to this attack by bringing up Truss? The answer, quite simply, is that the former PM remains a huge liability for the Conservatives. Sixteen months after she left office in disgrace, Truss currently has a net favourability rating of minus 60 . The public blame her not just for the sudden spike in mortgage rates during her premiership but for the fact that rates remain more than double their pre-2022 level (despite the global trend of higher rates). Her embrace of US conservatives including Donald Trump and her promotion of “deep state” conspiracy theories has made her seem even more out of touch with British voters than the launch of her “Popular Conservatism” movement earlier this month.

While Corbyn remains a painful topic for Labour, particularly as tensions over Israel-Palestine continue to rise, this is nothing compared to the internal crisis the Conservatives are being forced to have over Truss.

Undaunted by the ghost of Corbyn, Starmer invoked a second figure who has the potential to tear the Conservative Party apart: Nigel Farage. Was there potential, he asked, for the GB News presenter and Reform figurehead to be welcomed back into the Tory fold?

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Again, Sunak had an answer prepared, citing his party’s achievements on diversity: the first Jewish prime minister, the first female prime minister, the first black chancellor, the first Muslim home secretary and, now, the first Asian prime minister.

It’s a powerful record (and one which Labour might want to reflect on) but it meant walking into Starmer’s trap. The Labour leader now had a chance to declare that the Tory party would be willing to welcome Farage. Expect to hear shadow ministers run with that line of attack in the coming weeks.

Sunak got a blow of his own in, reminding everyone of the three former (but now suspended) Labour MPs standing in the Rochdale by-election and declaring: “We expel anti-Semites, he makes them Labour candidates”, prompting more cheers behind him. But in the wake of Lee Anderson’s suspension from the Conservatives over his Islamophobic remarks, neither leader could really claim the moral high ground here. Westminster politics is getting dirty.

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Episode 3 - Saw X, Hunt Club, Sleep Experiment, Ghost Stories, Dear David, Catacombs and Night Book Get Your Horror On!

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Episode 3 - Saw X, Hunt Club, Sleep Experiment, Ghost Stories, Dear David, Catacombs and Night Book. Email us your reviews of all things horror at [email protected]

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IMAGES

  1. Classic Ghost Stories

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  2. More Ghost Stories

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  3. Best Ghost Story Podcast

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  4. Ghost Stories the Podcast / Grandpa

    ghost stories podcast uk

  5. Ghost Stories

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  6. Ghost Stories & Podcasts

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VIDEO

  1. Further Ghost Stories

  2. ប្រជុំរឿងផ្ទះខ្មោច

  3. ផ្ទះសំណាក់ពេលពប្រឡងបាក់ឌុប

  4. ផ្ទះជួលមានខ្មោច

  5. ប្រជុំរឿងខ្មោចនៅសាលា

  6. ផ្ទះខ្មោចទិញ

COMMENTS

  1. Paranormal stories Podcast UK

    Listen to Podcasts. Submit a story. Latest News. Real ghost stories UK GhostPod Real paranomal experiences from the UK and Beyond.

  2. ‎Haunted UK Podcast on Apple Podcasts

    This is episode 44 of the Haunted UK Podcast, and it's time to hear stories from the amazing people who work in the emergency services and the military. ... Real Life Ghost Stories, and Paranormal Investigations from Some of the Most Haunt Rob Kirkup The Witch Farm BBC Radio 4 More ways to shop: find an Apple Store or other retailer near you ...

  3. Ghost Tales by the Fireside

    41 - The Ghosts of Athelhampton House - True Ghost Stories. 700 years of history and ghost stories are contained within this famous house in Dorset. 16 min. 11 JAN 2024. NO MUSIC - The Ghosts of Athelhampton House.

  4. 10 Horror podcasts to get you in the mood for Halloween

    Autumn is firmly upon us, and the dark evenings bring with them the perfect opportunity to hunker down, light some candles, lose ourselves in a ghost story and scare ourselves silly. With this in ...

  5. Listen to Ghost Story Podcast

    Follow Ghost Story on the Wondery App or wherever you get your podcasts. You can binge all episodes of Ghost Story ad-free right now by joining Wondery Plus in the Wondery App or on Apple Podcasts. If you have a really great ghost story or a wild family drama, reach out to us at [email protected] or call us at 1-347-460-9473 to share more ...

  6. 15 Best UK Spooky Podcasts You Must Follow in 2024

    Here are 15 Best UK Spooky Podcasts worth listening to in 2024. 1. Hypnogoria. Welcome to Hypnogoria, Britian's longest running horror podcast! Coming to you from the Great Library of Dream's, Mr Jim Moon invites you to t... more. hypnogoria.blogspo.. 2. Norfolk Folklore Society.

  7. ‎New Ghost Stories on Apple Podcasts

    This is a rare ghost story that manages to be both a reminder and a premonition - it reveals a frightening event from the past, and provides a terrifying warning of what might happen if one family can't find a way to change. Patrons help to keep this UK horror podcast going.

  8. Ghost Stories

    A hauntingly good toasted marshmallow scent brings you the essence of ghost stories told around a campfire. Ghost Stories Tonight let our resident ghosts treat you to some tales of times gone by, while a storm rolls on outside, and you toast treats over an ethereal fire.

  9. Ghost Tales by the Fireside

    Listen to Ghost Tales by the Fireside - True Ghost Stories Podcast on Spotify. True ghost stories from the UK by Clem Dallaway

  10. Ghost Tales by the Fireside

    33 NO MUSIC The Ghost of the Handel Hendrix House - True Ghost Stories This episode is in memory of the death of Jimi Hendrix, 53 years after his death. When Jimi Hendrix lived at 23 Brook Street in Mayfair, London, he experienced the ghostly vision of the composer George Handel who lived next door at 25 Brook Street.

  11. Ghost Tales …

    33 NO MUSIC The Ghost of the Handel Hendrix House - True Ghost Stories. This episode is in memory of the death of Jimi Hendrix, 53 years after his death. When Jimi Hendrix lived at 23 Brook Street in Mayfair, London, he experienced the ghostly vision of the composer George Handel who lived next door at 25 Brook Street.

  12. Listen to Classic Ghost Stories Podcast

    Tony Walker. A weekly podcast that reads out ghost stories, horror stories, and weird tales every week. Classic stories from the pens of the masters Occasionally, we feature living authors, but the majority are dead. Some perhaps are undead. We go from cosy Edwardian ghost stories (E. F. Benson, Walter De La Mare) to Victorian supernatural ...

  13. Ghost Tales by the Fireside

    True ghost stories from the UK by Clem Dallaway

  14. Real Life Ghost Stories Podcast

    Real Life Ghost Stories is a podcast dedicated to real life paranormal experiences. We discuss hauntings, ghosts, death, aliens, psychology, skeptics and everything in between. ... Every week 125 people in the UK take their own lives. And 75% of all UK suicides are male. CALM exists to change this. Join the campaign to take a stand against suicide.

  15. 15 Best UK Paranormal Podcasts You Must Follow in 2024

    Best UK Paranormal Podcasts. Listen to these podcasts for information related to the paranormal & supernatural, interviews with paranormal investigators, British paranormal, UK's most haunted locations, stories, and much more ... True Ghost Stories Podcast. True ghost stories from the UK by Clem Dallaway podcasters.spotify.. 664 2.3K 5 episodes ...

  16. ‎Real Life Ghost Stories on Apple Podcasts

    Real Life Ghost Stories is a podcast dedicated to real life paranormal experiences. We discuss hauntings, ghosts, death, aliens, psychology, skeptics and everything in between. In each episode we review our favourite (and least favourite) paranormal shows and movies. Email us your stories at: [email protected] Why not ...

  17. Horror, glamour … and heartache: how a hit true-crime podcast divided a

    The fact the podcast, Ghost Story, went on to win awards, as well as a worldwide audience, and that it is to be celebrated again on Monday evening in Ghost Story Live, staged at a London theatre ...

  18. BBC Sounds

    Browse all horror & supernatural radio shows, podcasts and mixes in BBC Sounds. See what's new, what's popular, or browse by a-z.

  19. 40 Best Ghost Story Podcasts You Must Follow in 2024

    Here are 40 Best Ghost Story Podcasts worth listening to in 2024. 1. Darkness Prevails Podcast | TRUE Horror Stories. US. TRUE Scary Stories, REAL Ghost Stories, and CREEPY Animal and Cryptid Sightings. This is Darkness Prevails, a horror podcast that specializes in givin... more. cms.megaphone.fm/c.. 12.7K 1 episode / week Avg Length 143 min ...

  20. The Classic Ghost Stories Podcast

    The Classic Ghost Stories Podcast is a weekly dose of spine-chilling thrills. Immerse yourself in vintage ghost stories from the pens of master storytellers, both living and deceased, and sometimes even undead. Discover the haunting beauty of classic tales, as well as the eerie familiarity of modern horror stories.

  21. Ghost Story

    Follow Ghost Story on the Wondery App or wherever you get your podcasts. You can binge all episodes of Ghost Story ad-free right now by joining Wondery Plus in the Wondery App or on Apple Podcasts. If you have a really great ghost story or a wild family drama, reach out to us at [email protected] or call us at 1-347-460-9473 to share more ...

  22. Ghost Tales by the Fireside

    Fantastic Podcast Just when I thought I'd heard all the best ghost story podcast I found this "crème de la crème" podcast. I love the spooky ambiance, original music and the narrator's voice. It is captivating and the sometimes ubiquitous cello music is like a ghostly presence that appears and then disappears throughout the narrative.

  23. 11 Best Ghost Story Podcasts to Send Chills Down Your Spine

    Ghost stories have at least one thing in common with real estate agents: an emphasis on location, location, location. From iconic haunted houses to more unusual haunted locales, a sense of place is critical to a good ghost story.That's certainly true of the tales told in Haunted Places, a podcast dedicated to the scary spots from around the world that seem to cast some kind of spectral spell.

  24. Introducing: Ghost Story

    Follow Ghost Story on the Wondery App or wherever you get your podcasts.You can binge all episodes of Ghost Story ad-free right now by joining Wondery Plus in the Wondery App or on Apple Podcasts. Wondery and Pineapple Street Studios present Ghost Story — a seven-part podcast series about family secrets, overwhelming coincidences and the things that come back to haunt us.

  25. The disaster you could see from space: how a podcast went inside an eco

    Nineteen dead, hundreds homeless and 700,000 taking legal action. Eco true-crime podcast Dead River delves into a Brazilian dam's collapse - and how it's led to the UK's biggest ever class ...

  26. ‎Ghost Story on Apple Podcasts

    You can binge all episodes of Ghost Story ad-free right now by joining Wondery Plus in the Wondery App or on Apple Podcasts. If you have a really great ghost story or a wild family drama, reach out to us at [email protected] or call us at 1-347-460-9473 to share more details. Please include your best contact info, so we can follow-up if we ...

  27. PMQs review: Liz Truss's ghost is still haunting Rishi Sunak

    He gleefully cited comments made by Truss about the "deep state" and her silence as the right-wing thug Tommy Robinson was praised at the Conservative Political Action Committee in the US last week, branding the Tories the "political wing of the flat Earth society". When Conservative MPs groaned, Starmer quipped: "They made her prime minister, now they can't bear talking about her."

  28. ‎Get Your Horror On!: Episode 3

    Episode 3 - Saw X, Hunt Club, Sleep Experiment, Ghost Stories, Dear David, Catacombs and Night Book. Email us your reviews of all things horror at [email protected] ‎Show Get Your Horror On!, Ep Episode 3 - Saw X, Hunt Club, Sleep Experiment, Ghost Stories, Dear David, Catacombs and Night Book - Feb 17, 2024