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Become the Confident Skipper of Your Own Sailboat

Your guide to the lateen sail.

  • Post author: Anns
  • Post published: November 6, 2022
  • Post category: Uncategorized
  • Post comments: 0 Comments

Introduction

When you think of a typical sailboat, you likely picture a triangular-shaped rig with two sails. However, there is another type of sail that has been used for hundreds of years: the lateen sail. In this guide, we’ll take a look at what makes up a lateen sail, its history and how it works. We’ll also discuss why this type of rigging was so popular in Mediterranean countries like Italy and Spain during the medieval period. So buckle up – it’s time to learn everything there is to know about the world’s most interesting type of rigging!

A lateen sail is an essential tool for any sailor.

The lateen sail is a triangular sail that is attached to the mast of a boat. It has been in use for centuries, and it is still used today on small boats and large ships, as well as in many different places around the world. The lateen sails are used for a variety of purposes, including fishing and warfare.

The primary advantage of a lateen sail is its flexibility. Unlike traditional square or triangular sails that have fixed angles between their sides, those of a lateen can adjust to fit whatever position you want to be sailing in at any given time. This makes them ideal for use on smaller boats where space may be limited or there’s not enough room for multiple types of rigging. In addition to this flexibility, they’re also easy and quick to set up while out at sea—a huge plus when you’re trying to get somewhere quickly!

What is a lateen sail?

The lateen sail is a triangular sail that is mounted on a long yard, or boom, which is attached to the mast at an angle of 45 degrees. This makes it easy for the sailor to tack and jibe. Tacking involves turning the boat through 90 degrees so that it goes from one tack (side of the boat) to another. Jibing involves moving from one side of your boat’s bow to its other side.

The lateen rig has been used for centuries by sailors in many parts of the world such as India and Java but it became especially popular in the Mediterranean during the 14th century AD because Europeans could not use square sails on their small boats due to lack of space between their masts and rigging lines; they needed something simpler than square rigs but not so complicated as a fore-and-aft rig like those used by Vikings before them or Scandinavians after them instead

Lateen sail history

The lateen sail is a triangular sail that originated in the Mediterranean Sea. The earliest known use of this type of sail was by the Egyptians, who used it to catch fish along the Nile River.

Later, it was adopted by the Greeks and Romans for their ships sailing around Greece and Italy.

The Arabs also used lateen sails on their dhows (ships) that traveled across the Indian Ocean to ply trade routes between East Africa and Arabia. It was also adopted by Viking ships along with other cultures such as China’s Ming Dynasty and Japan’s feudal period where they were used for transport rather than exploration as they are today. Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch and English explorers all made use of this type of sail during their voyages around Africa and Asia in search of new riches or territory to colonize.*

Lateen sail structure

The Lateen Sail is a triangular sail that can be hoisted on a long yard and slung at an angle to the mast. The yard is supported by a brace, which runs from the mast to the yard. The lateen sail is unique in that it is hoisted on a long yard and not attached directly to the mast.

This makes for an easy-to-control sail when sailing upwind or even downwind in light winds.

The lateen sails were used predominantly by Mediterranean traders from Italy, Spain and Portugal during Medieval times because of their ease of use as well as their ability for quick turn arounds when docking at port cities along their trade routes

How does a lateen sail work?

The lateen sail is a triangular sail that has been used for centuries. It is traditionally used in the Mediterranean and in the Indian Ocean, though it can be found all over the world. The lateen sail is most commonly used on small boats that are rigged fore-and-aft, but it can also be seen on larger vessels such as fishing boats, yachts and even tall ships.

The lateen sail has two sets of sides: one called the headboard, or luff; and one called the tack (the name comes from its position when tied to the masts). It has a balanced luff which means that if you pull down on both ends of the rope holding up your sheeting line—a metal ring attached to your mast—they will both tend towards their respective middle points. This allows for more control over how you move your boat since you can use this balanced weight distribution to help steer it into different directions. When set correctly, this creates an almost perfect triangle with equal angles pointing upward at each point—though some modern versions have only two sides instead of three because they are easier to construct with less material (and cost).

The lateen sail, Roman ships and the Crusades

The lateen sail was used on Roman ships, but only became popular in the Middle Ages. The sails were associated with the Crusades and later used on seafaring vessels that sailed to the Holy Land. During this time period, both Muslim traders and Christian pilgrims made use of these ships to travel across Mediterranean Sea.

Today, lateen sails are still found on traditional fishing boats across Europe and North Africa.

Different types of lateen sails

There are many different types of lateen sails, but they all have the same basic shape. They are also called triangular or triangular rig sails. These sails are used all over the world, most commonly in the Mediterranean Sea and in China. The Chinese junks were famous for their large number of masts and sails on them, which included both lateen-rigged and square-rigged ships.

The Vikings also used lateen-rigged ships when they were traveling across open water during their voyages around Europe in the middle ages. The Chinese and Arabs also used this type of sail extensively as well because it was easy to set up and take down quickly without any tools required – just grab one side then grab another!

Use this guide to learn about the fascinating history and benefits of the lateen sail.

You will learn about the history and benefits of using a lateen sail.

  • Lateen sails are used for small boats, especially in the Mediterranean region. They were also used on larger ships, especially as sailing technology developed over time.
  • In the Indian Ocean and Red Sea, they were used more than other types of sails because these waters have strong winds that favor lateen sails.
  • The Persian Gulf is another area where you can find many vessels with lateen sails; this is due to its proximity to India, where there are many people who use them regularly (and who also invented them).

We hope you enjoyed our guide to the Lateen Sail. We know there is a lot of information here, and it can be hard to take in all at once. The best way to learn about the world around us is through hands-on experience, so go out there and try sailing!

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Sunfish Sail Dinghy Reborn

  • By Chad Gillis
  • Updated: April 27, 2021

A black and white image of a man at a sewing machine.

The Sunfish. For thousands of sailors around the world, it’s an iconic name that conjures memories of beautiful beaches, colorful sails, whipping winds and a freedom that only comes from such a simple small craft. Many sailors have centered their love for the sport on a Sunfish—at summer camps in the lakes of the Midwest, along coastal stretches of both American coasts, and on pretty much any stretch of water between. First offered as a DIY wood kit in the 1950s, the Sunfish has been a staple of the recreational sailing and racing scenes for decades as a relatively inexpensive one‑design dinghy.

The ubiquitous and ­colorful singlehander has stood the test of time, but today it is at a performance crossroads. Technology has long surpassed the boat’s one-design ­limitations, and new generations of sailors are now drawn to modern dinghy classes with better equipment. But what if the Sunfish were reimagined with modern blades and a more efficient sail? There are several movements afoot to do just that, with innovations driven by Sunfish fanatics taking development matters into their own hands.

Leading one charge in the sail-development department is Kevin Farrar, of Farrar Sails in New London, Connecticut. He’s now manufacturing a ­non-class-legal Sunfish sail, one that he says is much faster than the triangular rag of yesteryear. The boom is also shorter on this rig, yet the sail area is increased by about 8 square feet.

“It’s clearly a significant change,” Farrar says. He’s been working his version of the Sunfish sail for several years. “The concept is to make something that’s going to make the boat appeal to 16-year-olds out there. This is a modern design, and it really works.”

His sails are getting faster too, generation by generation, as he makes tweaks that have also made the classic boat appear more modern. “Off the wind, [the latest generation is] radically faster than even what we were making in the second generation of sails,” Farrar says. “[The boats] are planing much faster. I’m not sure if they’re planing upwind quite yet, but it has taken [the Sunfish] a step beyond what the Laser is.”

Them might be fighting words. The Laser has long been the standard singlehanded dinghy, and it’s one of the most popular racing classes on the planet, but Farrar hopes his sail will help breathe new life into Sunfish sailing, perhaps even draw a new generation to what seems to be a declining class.

“It’s the basic lateen rig except that the sail area is 83 square feet, and the top of the sail is parallel to the waterline. You’re getting a lot more of the sail up and in better air,” Farrar says. “The boom has been shortened to about 10 feet.”

All equipment used in official Sunfish-class racing must have been offered by the builder at some point in the boat’s life cycle. And while the Sunfish’s modern blades are a big step up from the wooden blades of the early days, there’s still plenty of room for improvement. And that’s where Kent Misegades comes into the story. At his AeroSouth facilities, in Seven Lakes, North Carolina, he’s stamping out some pretty slick-looking foils for his Sunfish. He has a vertical rudder that has minimal weather helm, even in stronger winds. The current class-approved rudder is notorious for having strong weather helm when the wind pipes above 15 knots. Misegades says his rudder is better and faster (especially upwind), and it costs about the same as the Sunfish-class-supplied rudder. “I understand the one-design concept,” he says. “It’s an even playing field, so it really does come down to a comparison of skills. I understand it, but that, of course, kills innovation, so there are two sides to it.”

Misegades said he isn’t yet targeting the class ­association or asking racers to adopt his new daggerboard and ­rudder designs. He knows that most Sunfish owners don’t race, but no good sailor would ever argue against better handling. “I knew from the outset that any change of rules for the class is pretty involved, for good reason,” he says, “so, I never went about trying to convince the class to adopt them. We’ve never really gone to class ­racing, but something that’s intrigued me is there’s been discussion of a new rudder, and it’s opened their eyes to potentially get gear from a third party.”

Three sailboats sailing on the open waters.

Misegades says his ­rudder dramatically improves the Sunfish’s notorious weather helm, but he had other goals in mind during the design process. “The weather helm wasn’t my primary goal; it was mainly to reduce drag to improve pointing and speed,” he says. “I went through a lot of different plans; hundreds of iterations happened.

“It all comes down to the angle of the rudder, and in all angles, this rudder really is superior,” Misegades ­continues. “But there is one drawback to this vertical rudder in that it doesn’t scull. The Sunfish ­rudder does do that well.”

Misegades’ rudder is also prone to stalling during a tack if the helmsperson is not careful. “This vertical narrow rudder will whip the boat around, but it’s not nearly as ­effective as the standard rudder,” Misegades says.

AeroSouth’s foils are ­comparable in price to what class builders offer today. The wood-and-carbon version of the daggerboard is $350, which is less than the official class boar. AeroSouth’s rudder is $300.

The International Sunfish Class Association is likely to be slow in adopting this new gear, however. Perhaps for good reason. Larry Suter, who has raced Sunfish in seven different decades, has been pushing the class to set the stock rudder to 90 degrees. Doing so would be at least one step forward, he says. “If you go out in a Sunfish in 14 or 15 knots of wind, and if you feel the pull on the tiller and the pull on the mainsheet, it’s the same force,” Suter explains. “[The 90-degree rudder angle] really makes the boat a nice boat to sail. It doesn’t have the weather helm, and you don’t have to fight it.”

Lynne Randall, Florida Peninsula region representative for the Sunfish Class, is familiar with the new sails and blades being developed outside the manufacturer’s specs, and she is cognizant that the class association can’t simply change equipment every time a new piece of gear comes to market.

“It’s a really strong one-design group around here, so you have to keep the boat [setup in a way that’s] approved by the class,” Randall says. “These changes are interesting and fun, and some people are trying them out, but as far as one-design racing goes, you can’t do it.”

Randall says that the new gear will require investigation, testing, adopting and tweaking before it gets anywhere near approval under the class regulations. Drawing new sailors to an old class is an exciting idea, but so too is retaining the sailors who make up the bulk of the racing fleet

“Of course we want to grow the class, and it’s one of those things that evolves,” Randall says. “But if you want to sail ­recreationally, there are ways to try different things.”

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Description

Rocket  “the classic – made modern.”.

Light Weight = Easier and Faster!

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6’3″ Cockpit – Room Galore!

The Rocket comes with an expansive full length cockpit which stretches all the way to the stern. The cockpit bottom is padded with soft non-slip marine deck foam which is both gentle to the touch and rugged to survive the elements. This allows ample room to bring friends or cargo. Three or four kids can easily take the Rocket for a sail together, two adults can take the Rocket for a sail together.

Lateen Rig – Ease of Use!

Hoisting the sail could not possibly be any easier thanks to the Rocket’s timeless tried-and true lateen sail setup. The sail, boom and gaff lay down on the deck waiting for the halyard to be pulled. Pull the halyard 10 feet and cleat it. Congratulations! You’re done. Go sailing. Repeat these steps in reverse when you land. There is a good reason why the lateen sail has been used on millions of production sailing dinghies since the 1950’s. Dollar for dollar, outing for outing, nothing gets the job done more easily.

Each $5200 Rocket is a complete “sailaway package” with -Fully outfitted hull -Complete assembled mast and spars -Sail and all lines and ropes -daggerboard and rudder

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The 5 Best Sailboats For Beginners

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Last Updated by

Daniel Wade

December 27, 2023

Sailing is a fun activity for people of all experience levels. In fact, learning to sail a basic boat is relatively easy—in the right environment, you can start cruising with minimal experience.

However, the idea of a beginner commanding a 55-foot ketch in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean is a bit ridiculous. Even though virtually everyone can sail, beginners should learn the basics in a controlled environment—and on the correct boat.

Boat size doesn’t necessarily affect its beginner-friendliness, because sailors need to take into account factors such as rig simplicity and handling characteristics. 

Many beginners make the mistake of picking the wrong boat to begin with, which can lead to frustration and turn them off of sailing forever.

To mitigate these issues, this article will cover the best sailboats for beginners —so you can get on the water and start sailing safely and comfortably.

Table of contents

‍ Best Rigs for Beginners 

There are many types of sailboat rigging , and some are more beginner-friendly than others. Unfortunately, some of the most aesthetically pleasing rigs are also the most complicated. 

Eventually, sailors can acquire enough skill to master complex rigs, but it’s best to start simple. 

Arguably, one of the simplest sailing rigs is the Lateen Rig. This rig consists of a mast, boom, and spar, along with a single halyard and mainsheet. With only two ropes in its simplest configuration, the Lateen Rig makes an excellent starter sailboat, and it will be featured on this list. 

For larger boats, the Bermuda Sloop rig is an excellent choice. This rig is quite common and includes a jib for a larger sail plan.

For those who desire a slightly more robust (but single sail) layout, the gaff-rigged catboat is also an excellent choice. This versatile craft (and rig) has a large and relatively simple single sail, which is easier to handle than multiple sails.

Top Five Sailboats for Beginners 

Now, we’ll go over the top five sailboats for beginners . These boats will descend in order from smallest to largest, but not by the level of experience needed.  

Remember, just because you’re new to sailing doesn’t mean you have to settle for a boat that’s too small. Beginners can handle larger boats with some training, and some are easier to handle than their smaller counterparts.  ‍

The following boats were chosen because of their handling characteristics, low cost-of-ownership, and simplicity, as all of these factors are important for choosing the best beginner sailboat.

5) Sailing Dinghy

The sailing dinghy is the quintessential starter sailboat. These tiny, lightweight, popular, and highly affordable little craft is easy to operate and relatively difficult to capsize. The popular Optimist Sailing Dinghy, while designed for children up to the age of about 15, can be used (sometimes hilariously) by adults as well. An Optimist-style dingy is a great option for beginners over the age of 15, as boats of this style can be found in a variety of sizes. The sailing dinghy is a very popular youth racing sailboat, especially in the United States and the United Kingdom. While it’s not particularly fast, this little boat has wonderful handling characteristics and is relatively difficult to capsize. This open-cockpit boat uses a centerboard and detachable tiller and can be beached or carried atop a car without much hassle. The mast is removable, and all parts are easily stowed. Overall, the Optimist and its copycats are a remarkable little craft, equally useful as a tender for a larger boat or a standalone beginner sailboat.

Dinghy rigs vary between builders, but many use the simple Spirit Rig. The rig consists of a single sail and mainsheet, along with one mast, boom, and spar. The leech is stiffened by battens, and ties along the luff secure it all to the mast. Hoisting and securing the rig is easy, and lines are secured to the boat by a cleat. This simple rig has plenty of sail area for most places, and sailors can secure the mainsheet to a block or simply hold it in their hands.

The price of sailing dinghies can vary widely depending on multiple factors. Professionally-made sailing dinghies start around $3,500 new, and plywood kits are available for around $1,000 to $2,000. Used dinghies (including Optimist sailing dinghies) can be found on Craigslist for as low as a few hundred dollars. 

{{boat-info="/boats/vanguard-sunfish"}}

The Sunfish is a brilliant little sailboat, and a very fast boat indeed. This little racing dinghy, while only 13 feet in length, can be an enormous amount of fun for beginners and experienced sailors alike. The best way to describe the handling of a Sunfish is, ‘tender,’ though it’s not difficult to master this little boat. For its size, the Sunfish has a relatively large sail area and a very shallow draft. This boat has a small cockpit and can be controlled easily by a single person. The large sail plan of the Lateen-Rigged Sunfish makes for excellent performance in light winds and amazing speed on windy days. The Sunfish is a lightweight fiberglass boat with a simple rig and is a great step-up from a sailing dinghy. It’s possible to learn how to sail on this boat, but every sailor who’s spent time on a Sunfish will probably recommend bringing a towel. The boat is relatively easy to capsize for beginners and it heels aggressively, but these characteristics can teach sailors some important lessons. The heeling characteristics of the Sunfish can help beginners get accustomed to the feeling and help them understand the limits of a sailboat and how to avoid capsizing.

The Sunfish features a Lateen Rig, which has some shared characteristics with the simple Spirit Rig. The Lateen Rig has a single spar, mast, and boom, and is easy to set up and dismantle. The mast is removable as well, making stowing and transportation relatively easy. The large sail plan of the Sunfish makes it ideal for lakes and other areas where the wind is sporadic or very low, and the boat can be safely handled in many conditions. The boat is great for racing and learning and is also available in a Bermuda rig. The Sunfish is recognizable by the distinctive fish logo in the top corner of the sail, and the classic rainbow sails striping.

The Sunfish is still commercially manufactured. You can purchase one new from the factory for around $5,000 today, and options are available to make the boat your own. While the boat is designed to be sailed by a single person, two adults can purchase this boat and use it together comfortably. Used Sunfish prices vary, but a fully-outfitted boat in good condition can cost upwards of $1,000. They hold their value well, and they’re a great choice for beginners. 

{{boat-info="/boats/vanguard-laser"}}

The Laser is considered by many to be the Sunfish’s main competitor. The two boats are the same length (13 feet 9 inches) and share many of the same handling characteristics. However, the boats do have some notable differences. Many people consider the Laser to be a step-up from the Sunfish in difficulty, as the boat handles much more like a racer. The Laser has been used in the Olympics for racing. The laser is small and simple enough for beginners but requires skill to operate. Beginners can learn a lot from sailing a Laser and have an enormous amount of fun in the process. This fast little boat is simple and easy to set up but handles like a racecar.  If you’re a beginner on a laser, you’ll probably capsize at some point—which isn’t always a problem if you’re in a controlled environment, as the boat can be righted easily.

The laser is a Cat Rigged boat. This means it has only one mainsail and no headsails. The simple rig has a mast and a boom and is very easy to set up. The sail area of the laser is relatively large and designed for speed in high winds. The rig combined with the overall design of the sailboat makes it handle tenderly, which may be off-putting to some beginners. Regardless, it’s still a blast to sail for beginners with some experience.

New Laser sailboats start around $6,000 which is slightly more than the Sunfish. This simple centerboard cruiser is constructed as a race boat, which can explain some of the price increase. Used Laser sailboats are available on the market, though usually not as common as the Sunfish. Used Laser prices vary widely.

2) Gaff-Rigged Catboat

The gaff-rigged catboat isn’t a brand of boat—it’s a style of a sailboat that was once a popular workboat on the New England coast. This boat, which has only one mainsail and no headsails, is available in a wide range of designs. Catboats are famous for their handling and power and make a great sailboat for beginners. These vessels are available with centerboards, keels, cabins, and in open designs. Most catboats range from 15 to 19-feet long and can be built from wood or fiberglass. Catboats are easy to handle, and one who learns on a small catboat can easily transition to a larger one. Besides being one of the most easily recognizable sailboats, catboats are also some of the most versatile. A catboat can be just as suitable for lake cruising as it is for coastal waters.

The most common type of catboat rig is the Gaff Rig. This classic and robust rig is more complex than the simple Spirit and Lateen rig, but it’s more suitable for a ‘proper ship.’ The Gaff Rig can provide similar power as an equivalent Bermuda Rig, with much more elegance and a shorter mast. Many sailors prefer the classic Gaff Rig for its handling characteristics and durability.

It’s impossible to specify the price of catboats because they vary so much in design and size. New catboats (between 15 and 25-feet) can be purchased for less than $20,000, and used boats are numerous and varied. Cabin catboats tend to cost more, especially new—some run for more than $50,000 with a high level of amenities, including a head and galley. Numerous catboat plans are available online, and sailors report constructing them (usually of plywood) for just a few thousand dollars.

1) West Wight Potter 19

{{boat-info="/boats/west-wight-potter-19"}}

The West Wight Potter 19 is a fiberglass sailboat designed for safety, easy handling, and beginner-friendliness. This 19-foot trailer-sailor features a cabin with a vee-berth, a simple rig, and a retractable keel. The West Wight Potter 19 could potentially be the best cabin sailboat for beginners, and certainly one of the safest—the West Wight Potter 19, according to the manufacturer, is quite literally unsinkable. The hull is filled with buoyant materials, allowing the boat to be flooded and remain afloat. However, unsinkability isn’t the only characteristic of this boat that makes it ideal for beginners. The rig is simple and easy to set up, and the handling characteristics are excellent. The boat is not prone to aggressive heeling and handles confidently in a variety of conditions. While one generally wouldn’t consider it to be a blue-water cruiser, it’s still extremely capable—one sailor even sailed this vessel from California to Hawaii , which is over 2,000 nautical miles. The theoretical hull speed of this boat is around 5.4 knots, but it actually has a tendency to plane and achieve higher speeds. It’s a flat-bottomed cruiser, making it easy to beach and transport with its retractable keel and removable rudder. The West Wight Potter 19 is a great introduction to large sailboats and carries amenities normally reserved for boats at least 1/3 larger.

The West Wight Potter 19 is a Bermuda-Rigged sloop. The sail plan is sufficiently large to propel the boat in a variety of conditions, but not so large that it overpowers the boat. Sailors can single-hand the boat with ease, and set up and takedown are easy and require no special tools. The boat handles well in a variety of conditions and is well-known for its superior stability. The rig comes apart easily and can be stowed and trailered by one person.

The West Wight Potter 19 has been produced and sold commercially since the 1970s, and the used market has plenty of boats available, generally starting around $5,000. New West Wight Potter 19 sailboats are remarkably affordable compared to other boats with comparable characteristics. The West Wight Potter 19 is manufactured by International Marine in California. New sailboats start at just shy of $25,000. Owners can add an enormous range of extra features to their boats, including a hull-strengthening ‘blue water’ package, a stove, a head, electrical power, spare parts, and much more. The boats are highly customizable and can be outfitted for weekender sailing or long-term liveaboard cruising.

How to Pick a Sailboat

Picking a sailboat for beginners doesn’t have to be difficult.  Before deciding on a boat, consider your experience level and location.

If you only have access to rough ocean, it may not be the best idea to get an open dinghy.

If you live near a lake, a Sunfish could be a great way to start.

Also, consider your budget. If you’re looking for a $50 sailboat, you can probably find one, but it won’t be ideal.

If you have just a few thousand dollars to spend, you can set yourself up nicely with a little research .

Also, consider what you want to do with the sailboat. Recreation, fishing , cruising , and exploration are options, and require different kinds of boats.

Whichever you end up choosing, make sure you try it out and can sail it comfortably.

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Lateen Sails – What Are They And Why Are They Important?

A lot of people have never even heard of lateen sails, but their invention changed the world. Lateen sails are arguably one of the most important inventions of ancient history.

But what even are lateen sails, how do they work, when were lateen sails first invented and why were they so revolutionary? We answer all those questions, and a lot more besides, in this ultimate and comprehensive guide.

Living on our sailboat for 5 years has given us a keen interest in maritime history. We’re massive sailing nerds, in other words.

The lateen sail is actually something we’ve written about several times, partly because it’s the precursor to the triangular sails that almost all sailing vessels use today, and partly because we’re… massive nerds.

The lateen is so interesting because it unlocked one critical new ability that changed sailing forever – and with it transformed the worlds of travel, trade, exploration, and warfare. Join us as we explore what makes lateen sails special and just why they were so important to the ancient world.

a lateen rigged sailboat sailing into the sunset

Table of Contents

What is a lateen sail, why was the lateen sail so important, how can boats sail upwind, modern day lateen rigs.

A lateen is type of rig used on sailing vessels, featuring a triangular sail held up on side side by a long wooden spar called a “yard”. The yard mounts at roughly a 45-degree angle to the mast, running forward and aft.

The very first examples of the lateen sail crop up in the Mediterranean around the 2 nd century AD, but the lateen didn’t become popular until around the 5 th century BC.

Don’t be fooled by that slow burn popularity, though – the lateen would go on to change the world, and remain relevant for over a thousand years.

It was arguably one of the most important technologies of ancient history, and in many ways the spiritual successor to the Bermuda-type rigs seen on modern sailing vessels like sloops.  

The lateen was one of the first rigs to use aerodynamic sails pointing forward and aft, rather than big, square sails designed to act like parachutes and flying laterally across the beam. Why that distinction is so important, we’ll see in a moment.

Another rig operating on similar principles and originating at a similar time in the Mediterranean was the settee . The settee is essentially a lateen with the front corner cut off, giving it a quadrilateral (four-sided) shape instead of triangular. Settees were seen on working Arab dhows right into the 20 th century.

But now, the really interesting question – why was the lateen sail so important, historically speaking?

a fishing boat offshore

Sailing has been around for an almost unbelievably long time. We know for sure that people were sailing over 6,000 years ago, because we’ve found clay tablets and inscriptions depicting sailing boats and crew, complete with primitive rigs and square sails.  

6,000 years is a fairly long time in terms of civilised human history – for a frame of reference, writing wouldn’t be invented for another 600 years ; Woolly Mammoths would still walk the earth for another 2,000 or so ( no, really ).

In the Encyclopaedia Brittanica’s timeline of the most important technological discoveries , sailing is right near the start – in between iron and irrigation. We’ve found completely preserved boats that are over 10,000 years old .

But that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Some historians and anthropologists think that people in ancient Asia had to have been voyaging island-to-island as long as 25,000 years ago , crossing distances that would appear to necessitate sail propulsion.

The kicker is that for the overwhelming majority of those 25,000 years, people could only sail downwind.

They could steer a little to either side of downwind, but if they wanted to travel upwind or across the wind they had to row – or make clever use of the tides and currents. This naturally had a huge determining impact on the direction countries explored in and the nations they could trade with.

Sails in those days worked like parachutes – they were just big bags designed to catch as much wind as possible.

The lateen changed all that: being rigged fore-and-aft, and having that yard across the top to control the draught and shape of the sail, they could point their sails into the wind, not just across it, and generate lift in the same way a bird’s wing does. The yard also meant they could tack the sail – move it from one side of the boat to the other.

The upshot of this is that the lateen rig could tack upwind – and across the wind, along a coastline and back again. Suddenly, people could transport vast quantities of goods (or troops) in almost any direction – not just downwind – and turn around and come back again.

Its effect on the world, naturally, was transformative – even if over the course of several hundred years.

Mediterranean powers, such as the Romans, made extensive use of the lateen in both war and peace from at least the 5 th century (its name even comes from the word “Latin”), but Northern European nations didn’t truly catch on to triangular sails until around the 14 th century .

Nonetheless, sail would remain the dominant means of trade, exploration and foreign invasion for most world powers right through to the 19 th century.

Even today’s modern pleasure yachts almost exclusively use a fore-and-aft rigged style, such as a Bermuda rig, and owe a lot to the lateens of old.

the beautiful lateen sails of a red sailboat

A triangular sail like that found on a lateen works a lot like the wing of an aeroplane in flight.

It has a curved surface, like a half-teardrop. As air strikes the curved surface of the sail, it naturally forms an area of low pressure across the convex outer surface, and an area of higher pressure across the concave inner surface.

This happens because the air literally has further to travel on the outside of the curve; it has more space to spread out. Approximately the same number of air molecules are flowing over both the front and back of the sail, but the ones at the back are packing into the curve and creating a pocket of denser air. 

Pressure always wants to flow from high to low; thus, the boat slips forward into the area of low pressure, relieving the high pressure behind, even though that’s upwind… against the very force it’s using to propel itself.

This action is assisted by the keel, which is longer than it is wide – and therefore resists sideways movement, known as leeway, more than forward motion. The keel incorporates a heavy weight, called a bulb ballast, to counteract the forces acting on the sail above.

In our aeroplane-in-flight example, the keel is also acting like the other wing of the ‘plane. Because water is much denser than air, the keel naturally has to be smaller than the sail above.

Sailing vessels cannot sail directly into the wind, but modern performance yachts can get to within about 40 or 35 degrees.

A sailing vessel can still travel directly upwind, they just have to claw their way up by tacking backwards and forwards across the wind, in a zig-zag pattern, at the closest angle their boat allows.

You may hear sailors talk about velocity made good (VMG) – referring to the velocity at which a boat is moving towards her destination, regardless of how she is travelling through the water and across the ground in the process of getting there.

For example, I could be tacking across the wind at a 45-degree angle and making 5 knots over the ground, but if my destination is directly upwind and I’m always moving towards it at a 45-degree angle, I am actually only progressing towards it at 3.5 knots (this is my VMG).

That’s assuming I make no leeway at all, which obviously I do. But you get the picture – tacking upwind can take a long time, especially once current and tide come into play.

a sailboat cruising with lateen sails

While the lateen was largely out of fashion by the end of the 19 th century or so, it retained pockets of popularity well into the 20 th century – such as the Gundalows of Maine and New Hampshire.

Sailors liked that the entire sail and yard could easily be dropped for maintenance, and to pass under low bridges in the tidal waterways.

Similar rigs, such as the lug rig, were seen on fishing vessels right into the 20 th century as well.

The lateen was also heavily adopted by the Dutch and became the bezaan rig, which in turn eventually morphed into the Bermuda rig that was almost universally adopted by small sailing vessels by the end of the 20 th century.

As such, you could argue that the lateen’s DNA is present in almost all modern-day sailing boats, just minus the heavy yard!

Lateens fell from commercial use by the end of the 20 th century, but a handful of reproductions are still built and sailed – such as this lovely example .

Conclusion: Lateen Sails

the mast of a lateen rigged sailboat

The lateen represented a huge leap forward not just in sailing technology, but in the ability of ancient people to explore, trade, travel long distances and (unfortunately) invade each other.

That’s because it gave ancient people the ability to sail in almost any direction – upwind, downwind, or back and forth across the wind – say, along a coastline, from port to port and back.

Before the lateen, people could only sail in the direction the wind was blowing, give or take a few degrees. This severely hampered the usefulness of the boat as a means of transport – it could carry huge loads for great distances, but only in one direction.

The lateen changed all that. Its fore-and-aft-rigged design and aerodynamic shape allowed it to point upwind and generate enough lift and drive to propel the boat forward at 40 or 45 degrees off the wind.

It also introduced the ability to tack the sail, moving it from one side of the mast to the other. This in turn meant lateen-rigged boats could tack across the wind and even make progress towards a goal that was directly upwind, given time and persistence.

Naturally, this had huge military consequences – like every pawn on a chessboard suddenly getting queen moves. Manoeuvring became a decisive tactical factor in many of the great naval battles of the Age of Sail .

The lateen rig eventually gave rise to the Bermuda rig, which became more or less totally ubiquitous on small sailing vessels by the end of the 20 th century. Almost all modern pleasure yachts use a variation of the Bermuda rig, such as a sloop rig.

In conclusion the lateen was a hugely important and influential development; arguably one of the most important inventions of the ancient world, and certainly one of the most important sails of all time.

If you’re curious to find out more about modern day rigs then take a look at the best sails for cruising . They might look quite different but now you know where the inspiration came from!

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1985 AMF Sunfish

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Seller's Description

AMF Sunfish, 1985 sailboat for sale Excellent Condition (Garage Kept) Price: $2,200

Description: This Sunfish Sailboat is 13’9” long and 4’1” wide. It weighs 120 Lbs +/- and has a fiberglass hull with a foot well and storage compartment. The sail is lateen rigged on an aluminum mast and spars. It is currently fully rigged for racing, but can easily be simplified for learning how to sail or just allowing the kids explore the lake. It is a fun boat, can be wet and is easily righted after a capsize.

Includes: North Sail from 2013 World Championships Aluminum Mast and Spars Main Sheet 2 Main Sheet Hangers Ratchet Block (1 extra) Main Halyard (Red) Jens Rig Halyard (Yellow) Outhaul Cunningham Quick Adjust Gooseneck Vinyl Coated Wire Bridle (2 Extras) Inspection Port Fiberglass Rudder with a Carbon Fiber Tiller and Aluminum Hiking Stick Fiberglass Centerboard and Retaining Bungee Hiking Strap Start Timer Rudder and Centerboard Storage Bags Storage bag for Sail, Mast and Spars 2 Spar mounted Davis Wind indicators 1 Spar Fly A “Praddle” for when the wind dies Various spare parts and fittings. Stop Light/Directional Signal Light Bar that fits on hull Rudder Attachment when Trailering A Dynamic Dolly to facilitate launch and retrieval from shore line. or phone (215) 630-seven-one-eight-five

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Guide to Understanding Sail Rig Types (with Pictures)

There are a lot of different sail rig types and it can be difficult to remember what's what. So I've come up with a system. Let me explain it in this article.

What are the different types of sail rig? The sail rig is determined by the number of masts and the layout and shape of sails. Most modern ships are fore-and-aft rigged, while old ships are square-rigged. Rigs with one mast are sloops and cutters. Ketches, yawls, brigs, and schooners have two masts. Barques have three masts. Rigs can contain up to seven masts.

'Yeah, that's a gaff brig, and that a Bermuda cutter' - If you don't know what this means (neither did I) and want to know what to call a two-masted ship with a square-rigged mainsail, this article is definitely for you.

Sailboat in front of NYC with Bermuda mainsail and Jib

On this page:

More info on sail rig types, mast configurations and rig types, rigs with one mast, rigs with two masts, rigs with three masts, related questions.

This article is part 2 of my series on sails and rig types. Part 1 is all about the different types of sails. If you want to know everything there is to know about sails once and for all, I really recommend you read it. It gives a good overview of sail types and is easy to understand.

lateen rigged sailboat for sale

The Ultimate Guide to Sail Types and Rigs (with Pictures)

First of all, what is a sail rig? A sail rig is the way in which the sails are attached to the mast(s). In other words, it's the setup or configuration of the sailboat. The rig consists of the sail and mast hardware. The sail rig and sail type are both part of the sail plan. We usually use the sail rig type to refer to the type of boat.

Let's start by taking a look at the most commonly used modern sail rigs. Don't worry if you don't exactly understand what's going on. At the end of this article, you'll understand everything about rig types.

Diagram of most common rig types (Bermuda sloop, gaff cutter, gaff ketch, gaf schooner, full rigged ship)

The sail rig and sail plan are often used interchangeably. When we talk of the sail rig we usually mean the sail plan . Although they are not quite the same. A sail plan is the set of drawings by the naval architect that shows the different combinations of sails and how they are set up for different weather conditions. For example a light air sail plan, storm sail plan, and the working sail plan (which is used most of the time).

So let's take a look at the three things that make up the sail plan.

The 3 things that make up the sail plan

I want to do a quick recap of my previous article. A sail plan is made up of:

  • Mast configuration - refers to the number of masts and where they are placed
  • Sail type - refers to the sail shape and functionality
  • Rig type - refers to the way these sails are set up on your boat

I'll explore the most common rig types in detail later in this post. I've also added pictures to learn to recognize them more easily. ( Click here to skip to the section with pictures ).

How to recognize the sail plan?

So how do you know what kind of boat you're dealing with? If you want to determine what the rig type of a boat is, you need to look at these three things:

  • Check the number of masts, and how they are set up.
  • You look at the type of sails used (the shape of the sails, how many there are, and what functionality they have).
  • And you have to determine the rig type, which means the way the sails are set up.

Below I'll explain each of these factors in more detail.

The most common rig types on sailboats

To give you an idea of the most-used sail rigs, I'll quickly summarize some sail plans below and mention the three things that make up their sail plan.

  • Bermuda sloop - one mast, one mainsail, one headsail, fore-and-aft rigged
  • Gaff cutter - one mast, one mainsail, two staysails, fore-and-aft rigged
  • Gaff schooner - two-masted (foremast), two mainsails, staysails, fore-and-aft rigged
  • Gaff ketch - two-masted (mizzen), two mainsails, staysails, fore-and-aft rigged
  • Full-rigged ship or tall ship - three or more masts, mainsail on each mast, staysails, square-rigged

The first word is the shape and rigging of the mainsail. So this is the way the sail is attached to the mast. I'll go into this later on. The second word refers to the mast setup and amount of sails used.

Most sailboats are Bermuda sloops. Gaff-rigged sails are mostly found on older, classic boats. Square-rigged sails are generally not used anymore.

But first I want to discuss the three factors that make up the sail plan in more detail.

Ways to rig sails

There are basically two ways to rig sails:

  • From side to side, called Square-rigged sails - the classic pirate sails
  • From front to back, called Fore-and-aft rigged sails - the modern sail rig

Almost all boats are fore-and-aft rigged nowadays.

Square sails are good for running downwind, but they're pretty useless when you're on an upwind tack. These sails were used on Viking longships, for example. Their boats were quicker downwind than the boats with fore-and-aft rigged sails, but they didn't handle as well.

The Arabs first used fore-and-aft rigged sails, making them quicker in difficult wind conditions.

Quick recap from part 1: the reason most boats are fore-and-aft rigged today is the increased maneuverability of this configuration. A square-rigged ship is only good for downwind runs, but a fore-and-aft rigged ship can sail close to the wind, using the lift to move forward.

The way the sails are attached to the mast determines the shape of the sail. The square-rigged sails are always attached the same way to the mast. The fore-and-aft rig, however, has a lot of variations.

The three main sail rigs are:

  • Bermuda rig - most used - has a three-sided (triangular) mainsail
  • Gaff rig - has a four-sided mainsail, the head of the mainsail is guided by a gaff
  • Lateen rig - has a three-sided (triangular) mainsail on a long yard

The Bermuda is the most used, the gaff is a bit old-fashioned, and the lateen rig is outdated (about a thousand years). Lateen rigs were used by the Moors. The Bermuda rig is actually based on the Lateen rig (the Dutch got inspired by the Moors).

Diagram of lateen, gaff, and bermuda rig

Other rig types that are not very common anymore are:

  • Junk rig - has horizontal battens to control the sail
  • Settee rig - Lateen with the front corner cut off
  • Crabclaw rig

Mast configuration

Okay, we know the shape of the mainsail. Now it's time to take a look at the mast configuration. The first thing is the number of masts:

  • one-masted boats
  • two-masted boats
  • three-masted boats
  • four masts or up
  • full or ship-rigged boats - also called 'ships' or 'tall ships'

I've briefly mentioned the one and two mast configurations in part 1 of this article. In this part, I'll also go over the three-masted configurations, and the tall ships as well.

A boat with one mast has a straightforward configuration because there's just one mast. You can choose to carry more sails or less, but that's about it.

A boat with two masts or more gets interesting. When you add a mast, it means you have to decide where to put the extra mast: in front, or in back of the mainmast. You can also choose whether or not the extra mast will carry an extra mainsail. The placement and size of the extra mast are important in determining what kind of boat we're dealing with. So you start by locating the largest mast, which is always the mainmast.

From front to back: the first mast is called the foremast. The middle mast is called the mainmast. And the rear mast is called the mizzenmast.

Diagram of different mast names (foremast, mainmast, mizzenmast)

What is the mizzenmast? The mizzenmast is the aft-most (rear) mast on a sailboat with three or more masts or the mast behind the mainmast on a boat with two masts. The mizzenmast carries the mizzen sail. On a two-masted boat, the mizzenmast is always (slightly) smaller than the mainmast. What is the purpose of the mizzen sail? The mizzen sail provides more sail area and flexibility in sail plan. It can be used as a big wind rudder, helping the sailor to have more control over the stern of the ship. It pushes the stern away from the wind and forces the bow in the opposite way. This may help to bring the bow into the wind when at anchor.

I always look at the number of masts first, because this is the easiest to spot. So to make this stuff more easy to understand, I've divided up the rig types based on the number of masts below.

Why would you want more masts and sail anyways?

Good question. The biggest advantage of two masts compared to one (let's say a ketch compared to a sloop), is that it allows you to use multiple smaller sails to get the same sail area. It also allows for shorter masts.

This means you reduce the stress on the rigging and the masts, which makes the ketch rig safer and less prone to wear and tear. It also doesn't capsize as quickly. So there are a couple of real advantages of a ketch rig over a sloop rig.

In the case of one mast, we look at the number of sails it carries.

Boats with one mast can have either one sail, two sails, or three or more sails.

Most single-masted boats are sloops, which means one mast with two sails (mainsail + headsail). The extra sail increases maneuverability. The mainsail gives you control over the stern, while the headsail gives you control over the bow.

Sailor tip: you steer a boat using its sails, not using its rudder.

The one-masted rigs are:

  • Cat - one mast, one sail
  • Sloop - one mast, two sails
  • Cutter - one mast, three or more sails

Diagram of one-masted rigs (bermuda cat, bermuda sloop, gaff cutter)

The cat is the simplest sail plan and has one mast with one sail. It's easy to handle alone, so it's very popular as a fishing boat. Most (very) small sailboats are catboats, like the Sunfish, and many Laser varieties. But it has a limited sail area and doesn't give you the control and options you have with more sails.

The most common sail plan is the sloop. It has one mast and two sails: the main and headsail. Most sloops have a Bermuda mainsail. It's one of the best racing rigs because it's able to sail very close to the wind (also called 'weatherly'). It's one of the fastest rig types for upwind sailing.

It's a simple sail plan that allows for high performance, and you can sail it short-handed. That's why most sailboats you see today are (Bermuda) sloops.

This rig is also called the Marconi rig, and it was developed by a Dutch Bermudian (or a Bermudian Dutchman) - someone from Holland who lived on Bermuda.

A cutter has three or more sails. Usually, the sail plan looks a lot like the sloop, but it has three headsails instead of one. Naval cutters can carry up to 6 sails.

Cutters have larger sail area, so they are better in light air. The partition of the sail area into more smaller sails give you more control in heavier winds as well. Cutters are considered better for bluewater sailing than sloops (although sloops will do fine also). But the additional sails just give you a bit more to play with.

Two-masted boats can have an extra mast in front or behind the mainmast. If the extra mast is behind (aft of) the mainmast, it's called a mizzenmast . If it's in front of the mainmast, it's called a foremast .

If you look at a boat with two masts and it has a foremast, it's most likely either a schooner or a brig. It's easy to recognize a foremast: the foremast is smaller than the aft mast.

If the aft mast is smaller than the front mast, it is a sail plan with a mizzenmast. That means the extra mast has been placed at the back of the boat. In this case, the front mast isn't the foremast, but the mainmast. Boats with two masts that have a mizzenmast are most likely a yawl or ketch.

The two-masted rigs are:

  • Lugger - two masts (mizzen), with lugsail (a cross between gaff rig and lateen rig) on both masts
  • Yawl - two masts (mizzen), fore-and-aft rigged on both masts. Main mast is much taller than mizzen. Mizzen without a mainsail.
  • Ketch - two masts (mizzen), fore-and-aft rigged on both masts. Main mast with only slightly smaller mizzen. Mizzen has mainsail.
  • Schooner - two masts (foremast), generally gaff rig on both masts. Main mast with only slightly smaller foremast. Sometimes build with three masts, up to seven in the age of sail.
  • Bilander - two masts (foremast). Has a lateen-rigged mainsail and square-rigged sails on the foremast and topsails.
  • Brig - two masts (foremast), partially square-rigged. The main mast carries small lateen-rigged sail.

Diagram of two-masted rigs (gaff yawl, gaff ketch, gaff schooner, and brig)

The yawl has two masts that are fore-and-aft rigged and a mizzenmast. The mizzenmast is much shorter than the mainmast, and it doesn't carry a mainsail. The mizzenmast is located aft of the rudder and is mainly used to increase helm balance.

A ketch has two masts that are fore-and-aft rigged. The extra mast is a mizzenmast. It's nearly as tall as the mainmast and carries a mainsail. Usually, the mainsails of the ketch are gaff-rigged, but there are Bermuda-rigged ketches too. The mizzenmast is located in front of the rudder instead of aft, as on the yawl.

The function of the ketch's mizzen sail is different from that of the yawl. It's actually used to drive the boat forward, and the mizzen sail, together with the headsail, are sufficient to sail the ketch. The mizzen sail on a yawl can't really drive the boat forward.

Schooners have two masts that are fore-and-aft rigged. The extra mast is a foremast which is generally smaller than the mainmast, but it does carry a mainsail. Schooners are also built with a lot more masts, up to seven (not anymore). The schooner's mainsails are generally gaff-rigged.

The schooner is easy to sail but not very fast. It handles easier than a sloop, except for upwind, and it's only because of better technology that sloops are now more popular than the schooner.

The brig has two masts. The foremast is always square-rigged. The mainmast can be square-rigged or is partially square-rigged. Some brigs carry a lateen mainsail on the mainmast, with square-rigged topsails.

Some variations on the brig are:

Brigantine - two masts (foremast), partially square-rigged. Mainmast carries no square-rigged mainsail.

Hermaphrodite brig - also called half brig or schooner brig. Has two masts (foremast), partially square-rigged. Mainmast carries a gaff rig mainsail and topsail, making it half schooner.

Three-masted boats are mostly barques or schooners. Sometimes sail plans with two masts are used with more masts.

The three-masted rigs are:

  • Barque - three masts, fore, and mainmast are square-rigged, the mizzenmast is usually gaff-rigged. All masts carry mainsail.
  • Barquentine - three masts, foremast is square-rigged, the main and mizzenmast are fore-and-aft rigged. Also called the schooner barque.
  • Polacca - three masts, foremast is square-rigged, the main and mizzenmast are lateen-rigged.
  • Xebec - three masts, all masts are lateen-rigged.

Diagram of three-masted rigs (barque, full rigged ship)

A barque has three or four masts. The fore and mainmast are square-rigged, and the mizzen fore-and-aft, usually gaff-rigged. Carries a mainsail on each mast, but the mainsail shape differs per mast (square or gaff). Barques were built with up to five masts. Four-masted barques were quite common.

Barques were a good alternative to full-rigged ships because they require a lot fewer sailors. But they were also slower. Very popular rig for ocean crossings, so a great rig for merchants who travel long distances and don't want 30 - 50 sailors to run their ship.

Barquentine

The barquentine usually has three masts. The foremast is square-rigged and the main and mizzenmast fore-and-aft. The rear masts are usually gaff-rigged.

Faster than a barque or a schooner, but the performance is worse than both.

The polacca or polacre rig has three masts with a square-rigged foremast. The main and mizzenmast are lateen-rigged. Beautiful boat to see. Polacca literally means 'Polish' (it's Italian). It was a popular rig type in the Mediterranean in the 17th century. It looks like the xebec, which has three lateen-rigged masts.

Fun fact: polaccas were used by a Dutch sailor-turned-Turkish-pirate (called Murat Reis).

The xebec is a Mediterranean trading ship with three masts. All masts are lateen-rigged. I couldn't find any surviving xebecs, only models and paintings. So I guess this rig is outdated a long time.

A boat with three or more masts that all carry square-rigged sails is called a ship, a tall ship, or a full-rigged ship. So it's at this point that we start calling boats 'ships'. It has nothing to do with size but with the type of rigging.

More sails mean less stress on all of them. These ships use a lot of sails to distribute the forces, which reduces the stress on the rigging and the masts. Square sails mean double the sail area in comparison to triangular sails.

They are quite fast for their size, and they could outrun most sloops and schooners (schooners were relatively a lot heavier). The reason is that tall ships could be a lot longer than sloops, giving them a lot of extra hull speed. Sloops couldn't be as large because there weren't strong enough materials available. Try making a single triangular sail with a sail area of over 500 sq. ft. from linen.

So a lot of smaller sails made sense. You could have a large ship with a good maximum hull speed, without your sails ripping apart with every gust of wind.

But you need A LOT of sailors to sail a tall ship: about 30 sailors in total to ie. reef down sails and operate the ship. That's really a lot.

Tall ships are used nowadays for racing, with the popular tall ship races traveling the world. Every four years I go and check them out when they are at Harlingen (which is very close to where I live).

Check out the amazing ships in this video of the tall ship races last year near my hometown. (The event was organized by friends of mine).

What is the difference between a schooner and a sloop? A schooner has two masts, whereas the sloop only has one. The schooner carries more sails, with a mainsail on both masts. Also, sloops are usually Bermuda-rigged, whereas schooners are usually gaff-rigged. Most schooners also carry one or two additional headsails, in contrast to the single jib of the sloop.

What do you call a two-masted sailboat? A two-masted sailboat is most likely a yawl, ketch, schooner, or brig. To determine which one it is you have to locate the mainmast (the tallest). At the rear: schooner or brig. In front: yawl or ketch. Brigs have a square-rigged foremast, schooners don't. Ketches carry a mainsail on the rear mast; yawls don't.

What is a sloop rig? A sloop rig is a sailboat with one mast and two sails: a mainsail and headsail. It's a simple sail plan that handles well and offers good upwind performance. The sloop rig can be sailed shorthanded and is able to sail very close to the wind, making it very popular. Most recreational sailboats use a sloop rig.

What is the difference between a ketch and a yawl? The most important difference between a ketch and a yawl are the position and height of the mizzenmast. The mizzenmast on a yawl is located aft of the rudder, is shorter than the mainmast and doesn't carry a mainsail. On a ketch, it's nearly as long as the mainmast and carries a mainsail.

Pinterest image for Guide to Understanding Sail Rig Types (with Pictures)

There are a wonderful lots of DIY changeability shows on the cable airwaves these days.

Rick the rigger

There are SO many errors on this site it really should be taken down.

First major mistake is to say you are no longer afraid of the sea.

One that truly gets up my nose is the term ‘fully’ rigged ship. It’s a FULL rigged ship!! Your mast names are the wrong way round and just because there may be 3 it doesn’t automatically mean the one in the middle is the main.

I could go on and totally destroy your over inflated but fragile ego but I won’t. All I will say is go learn a lot more before posting.

Shawn Buckles

Thanks for your feedback. If you like to point out anything more specific, please let me know and I will update the articles. I’ve changed fully-rigged to full-rigged ship - which is a typo on my part. I try to be as concise as I can, but, obviously, we all make mistakes every now and then. The great thing about the internet is that we can learn from each other and update our knowledge together.

If you want to write yourself and share your knowledge, please consider applying as a writer for my blog by clicking on the top banner.

Thanks, Shawn

Well, I feel that I’ve learned a bit from this. The information is clear and well laid out. Is it accurate? I can’t see anything at odds with the little I knew before, except that I understood a xebec has a square rigged centre mainmast, such as the Pelican ( https://www.adventureundersail.com/ )

Hi, Shawn, You forgot (failed) to mention another type of rig? The oldest type of rig known and still functions today JUNK RIG!

Why are so many of the comments here negative. I think it is wonderful to share knowledge and learn together. I knew a little about the subject (I’m an Aubrey-Maturin fan!) but still found this clarified some things for me. I can’t comment therefore on the accuracy of the article, but it seems clear to me that the spirit of the author is positive. We owe you some more bonhomme I suggest Shawn.

As they say in the Navy: “BZ” - for a good article.

Been reading S.M. Stirling and wanted to understand the ship types he references. Thank you, very helpful.

This site is an awesome starting point for anyone who would like to get an overview of the subject. I am gratefull to Shawn for sharing - Thanks & Kudos to you! If the negative reviewers want to get a deeper technical knowledge that is accurate to the n-th then go study the appropriate material. Contribute rather than destroy another’s good work. Well done Shawn. Great job!

Good stuff Shawn - very helpful. As a novice, it’s too confusing to figure out in bits and pieces. Thanks for laying it out.

First of all I have to say that Rick ‘the rigger’ is obviously the one with the “over inflated but fragile ego” and I laughed when you suggested he share his knowledge on your blog, well played!

As for the content it’s great, hope to read more soon!

Alec Lowenthal

Shawn, I have a painting of a Spanish vessel, two masted, with. Lateen sails on both masts and a jib. The mainsail is ahead of the main mast (fore) and the other is aft of the mizzen mast. Would this be what you call lugger rig? I have not seen a similar picture. Thanks, Alec.

Thank you for your article I found easy to read and understand, and more importantly remember, which emphasises the well written.. Pity about the negative comments, but love your proactive responses!

This vessel, “SEBASTIAN” out of Garrucha, Almería, España, was painted by Gustave Gillman in 1899.

Sorry, picture not accepted!

Thank you for a very informative article. I sail a bit and am always looking for more knowledge. I like the way you put forth your info and I feel if you can’t say anything positive, then that person should have their own blog or keep their opinions to their-self. I will be looking for more from you. I salute your way of dealing with negative comments.

Thank you for a great intro to sailing boats! I searched different sailboats because I use old sails tp make bags and wanted to learn the difference. Way more than I ever expected. Thanks for all the work put in to teach the rest of us.

Your description of a cutter is lacking, and your illustrations of “cutters” are actually cutter-rigged sloops. On a true cutter, the mast is moved further aft (with more than 40% of the ship forward of the mast). A sloop uses tension in the backstay to tension the luff of the foresail. The cutter can’t do this.

Also, a bermuda-rigged ketch will have a line running from the top of the mainmast to the top of the mizzenmast.

wow great guide to rig types! thanks

Interesting guide, however I am confused about the description of the brig. You say the main mast on a brig can have a lateen sail, but in your picture it looks like a gaff sail to me. How is it a lateen sail?

Hi Shawn, thank you for taking the time to share this information. It is clear and very helpful. I am new to sailing and thinking of buying my own blue water yacht. The information you have supplied is very useful. I still am seeking more information on performance and safety. Please keep up the good work. Best Regards

mickey fanelli

I’m starting to repair a model sailboat used in the lake I have three masts that have long been broken off and the sails need replacement. So my question is there a special relationship between the three masts I do have reminents of where the masts should go. they all broke off the boat along with the sails I can figure out where they go because of the old glue marks but it makes no sense. or does it really matter on a model thank you mickey

Cool, total novice here. I have learnt a lot. Thanks for sharing - the diagrams along with the text make it really easy to understand, especially for a beginner who hasn’t even stepped on a sailing boat.

Daryl Beatt

Thank you. Cleared up quite a few things for me. For example, I was familiar with the names “Xebecs” and “Polaccas” from recent reading about the Barbary War. I had gathered that the two Barbary types were better suited to sailing in the Med, but perhaps they were less able to be adaptable to military uses,(but one might assume that would be ok if one plans to board and fight, as opposed to fight a running gun duel). Specifically, the strangely one sided August 1, 1801 battle between the USS Enterprise under Lt. John Sterett and the Polacca cruiser Tripoli under Admiral Rais Mahomet Rous. On paper both ships seemed nearly equal in size, guns and crew, but pictures of the battle are confusing. While the Enterprise is usually rendered as the familiar schooner, the polacca Tripoli has been pictured in radically different ways. Thus the Wikipedia picture by Hoff in 1878 used to illustrate the Battle shows a Brig design for Tripoli, indicating 77 years later, polaccas were no longer common.

Lee Christiansen

I am curious as to what you would call a modern race boat with a fractional jib,not equipped for full masthead hoist? Thanks Lee

Thanks Guy: The information and pictures really eliminate a lot of the mystery of the terminology and the meanings. Also appreciate the insight of the handling idiosyncrasies “hand” (staff) requirements to manage a vessel for one that has not been on the water much. I long to spend significant time afloat, but have concern about the ability to handle a vessel due to advancing age. The Significant Other prefers to sit (in AC comfort)and be entertained by parties of cruise line employees. Thanks again for the information.

Gordon Smith

Your discussion made no mention of the galleon, a vessel with either square-rigged Fore and Main masts and a shorter lateen-rigged Mizzen, or, on larger galleons, square-rigged Fore and Main masts, with a lateen-rigged Mizzen and a lateen-rigged Bonaventure mast, both shorter than either the Fore or Main masts. Also, it was not uncommon for a galleon to hoist a square-rigged bowsprit topsail in addition to the usual square-rigged spritsail.

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Lateen Sail Question, I’m Sure There’s a Reason

  • Thread starter blackislandben
  • Start date Aug 24, 2020
  • Forums for All Owners
  • Ask All Sailors

blackislandben

New poster here with a question. I sail small boats and favor the simplicity of the lateen rig. I am currently converting a boat to a lateen rig and wondered why I have never seen one with the spars mounted to the mast at the apex(or very front of the yard/boom). This would certainly eliminate the “bad side of the mast” issue. Would be easy to do. What am I missing here. Please excuse any misuse of terminology, feel free to correct as necessary.  

walmsleyc

maybe a sketch of what your thinking? The boom part would/might be fine, but the yard part of a lanteen rig gets its support (in order to get proper sail shape) from being supported, part way along, by the mast. I suppose what your suggesting is just a gaff rigged boat, with a "zero" length luff? Chris  

Most likely it is to balance the sail plan and make it easier to control the main sail. The sail area forward of the mast, although small, exerts a force to counter the force of the section behind the mast. On larger boats rudders are often designed so that part of the rudder is forward of the rudder post for the same reason. It makes it easier to steer.  

capta

Though I don't have a lot of first hand experience with the lateen rig, I'm pretty sure it is an important part of its design that there is the correct amount of sail in front of the mast for balance. It is even possible that this can be shifted for the point of sail one intends to be on.  

Thanks so much for the reply! The yard is drawn up into a yoke/gallows on the mast. The mast is in an outer tube socket, sits on a sealed bearing and is free to rotate with the sail. The yoke stays the yard. If you think about it when a lateen is on the good side of the mast is unsupported except by the halyard. The yoke will stay it in both directions. Disregard the squiggle . Please excuse the crude drawing but you get the idea I’m hoping.  

Attachments

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blackislandben said: Thanks so much for the reply! The yard is drawn up into a yoke/gallows on the mast. The mast is in an outer tube socket, sits on a sealed bearing and is free to rotate with the sail. The yoke stays the yard. If you think about it when a lateen is on the good side of the mast is unsupported except by the halyard. The yoke will stay it in both directions. Disregard the squiggle . Please excuse the crude drawing but you get the idea I’m hoping. Click to expand

Thanks for all your replies and thoughts. The yard/boom only extend 12” past the mast. I don’t see a lot of area there to balance the forces. Here’s a pic of the sail a 66sf Sunfish. (not my boat) On my rig the boom is level leaving little past the mast. Plan to use at least a 2:1 purchase. Main Idea is to eliminate bad side of the mast. I sail long runs on the return it’s all bad mast. I have over come this by having a mast eye on both sides of the boom. I just pull the mast and swap sides. Bad thing is the yard won’t fully come back next to the boom and easily fit in the sail bag.  

BB35C7E4-89F7-4A9F-A665-AD8852341140.jpeg

blackislandben said: The yard/boom only extend 12” past the mast. I don’t see a lot of area there to balance the forces. Click to expand

rgranger

I'm not getting it. Why would you want to move the center of effort so far back... you'll be fighting the tiller whenever you get gusted. If you don't like the way the latteen rig is set up, then convert to a cat rig. A gaff rig, might even allow for an additional staysail above the yard... but heck... now you're getting complicated. Your mainsail power will be in the back half of the sail, so what air is disturbed when the yard is to windward... I can't really see how it will affect performance. I've owned both Lasers (a cat rig) and a sunfish (lateen) and I prefer the cat rig for performance. The lateen's advantage, imho.. is easier to handle and balance due the rig's low aspect ratio. Bottom line........ make the change... if you like it.....cool.... if not... convert it back to original. It's that simple. there's no right or wrong.  

Thanks y’all for all the input. I know there is a massive amount of knowledge and experience within the forum and I appreciate your opinions. I like to experiment with ideas. I can make easily reversible mods to the rig to check the concept. Joe The boat involved actually needs the center of effort moved back due to some previous mods that moved the mast forward. The boat is an on going experiment of sorts in its own right. I probably should not have gotten involved with it but the price was right(free), and it was just too darned cute to let it get cut up.  

All U Get

The book I have on my shelf is OFFSHORE YACHTS desirable and undesirable characteristics by John Rousmaniere. It has more answers than you have questions but the ones that stick out would be spin on axis and righting moment. Since it’s off the shelf, I’ll be reading it later. Is this a small boat?  

After thinking about the proposed modification to your rig, there is one huge issue that hasn't been addressed, sail twist. All sails twist. The upper leach will fall off to leeward. This is expected and because the wind at the top of the mast is different from the wind at the bottom a desired characteristic as it improves sail performance. Like all good things, too much twist is bad and impairs sail performance. On a lateen rig, the location of the mast connection serves 2 purposes, as noted earlier it provides a small section of sail ahead of the mast which helps to balance the rig and reduce pressure on the main sheet and makes steering easier. The second and probably more important function is to stabilize the upper section of the sail so that it does not twist. The mast, the upper and lower spars form a triangle this prevents the upper spar from twisting more than the aluminum pole will twist (on a small boat, that's not much). The upper and lower spars will be in the same vertical plane. In the proposed modification, this triangle will not exist which will allow the top spar to fall off to leeward significantly reducing sail efficiency. The line (topping lift) used to support the upper spar will only keep the upper and lower spars in the same vertical plane when head to wind or in irons. The design proposed by @rgranger over comes this limitation by drawing the upper spar close to the mast, essentially making it an extension of the mast. Depending on how it is rigged, the amount of twist can be controlled by how close to the mast the upper spar is drawn. This design is very similar to the standard triangular mainsail most of us use. The lateen sail you have will need modification to work with this design. The tack will need to be close to 90° and the lateen sail is probably closer to 60°. Using the lateen sail in this configuration will move the center of effort much higher and cause the boat to be more tender.  

It’s kinda small, 17ft. It’s one of those things that evolves from a set of unforeseen circumstances. The poor thing had been stripped of all rig and abandoned behind an abandoned house. I after a few years ran down the owner and was given it. The only logical thing to do with it was to make it a motor launch, which it has proven to be excellent at. I also love land sailing and built a great sailing land yacht. Unfortunately as the beach became more crowded each year wizzing around tourists at 25+ began to be frowned upon. So I reluctantly dismantled the sailer. So lm left with a complete but way too small sail rig. What to do, combine them into a motorsailer. In a 12-15mph breeze it does sail leisurely along which my wife loves. Case closed, done deal, it is what it is. Im now about firming up the rig. Hoping to get a Neil Pryde 83sf sail. That’s is as far as it goes. Was just considering the modded rig maybe to improve performance a tad? So you can see how it’s evolved into an esoteric assemblage. Things gotta go where they gotta go now. Its odd but does work reasonably well. It does have its quirks, but most quirky things are interesting. Before and now evolving pics And my deceased landsailer.  

2D459794-25E0-4EE2-9143-927233A0C26D.jpeg

She cleaned up nice! The sail is too small for the boat. But I suspect you knew that already. Keep your eye out for a boat of similar size that has a bad hull and good mast and boom. That will give you the best performance.  

dlochner, thanks for that insight! Will just leave as is and motorsail leisurely around the tidal creeks to the beach. As they say it’s not the destination but the trip. Thanks everyone for all your input!!  

PaulK

The Sliding Gunter: A versatile Traditional Sailing Rig

Helpful

PaulK said: Sliding Gunter rig. Been around a while. The Sliding Gunter: A versatile Traditional Sailing Rig www.duckworksmagazine.com Click to expand

Had a W W Potter 14 with that rig. Was a near little boat. Like the hard chines sailed pretty flat.  

shemandr

An excellent article. I will chew on that for a while. The dory I built had a sprit sail arrangement. I have to say the snotter was not as adjustable as said because I would have to go to forward in the boat while the main would be flailing out of control. It wasn't safe. I never got the hang of the snotter/sprit arrangement. But I didn't have instruction. Years later a friend told me of the old time expression, "Cheese down the snotter." We got a kick out of that. Traditional rigs are a hoot.  

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lateen rigged sailboat for sale

Boat plans to make the sea more beautiful

Gabian: a lateen rigged boat.

  • Post author: François Vivier
  • Post published: 9 January 2016
  • Post category: Actualités / Launchings / Wooden boat-building
  • Post comments: 2 Comments

You are currently viewing Gabian: a lateen rigged boat

For many years, I had in mind to draw a Mediterranean boat, named pointu or barquette on the French Med coast. Michel Aubert, living in the countryside near Fréjus and Cannes, gave me the chance. As most of my designs, I did not try to draw a true replica of a given traditional boat, but to create something inspired from tradition, but suitable for both home builders and present days use. In particular, the boat had to be trailerable and easy to launch, such that it not necessary to have a permanent mooring. The hull length is 5 m for 1.75 m breadth, making the boat built and maintained in a current size garage. Dimensions and hull lines are close to existing barquette .

These Mediterranean hulls have a pointed stern. So, it is difficult to use the strip planking building method. Plywood clinker is very far from Mediterranean tradition and was not an acceptable way. Therefore, we have decided to build as a carvel hull, but using plywood boards. We use in fact the stitch and tape method, but with a high number of planks, 10 per side. All planks are CNC cut. Holes for stitching are also drilled by the CNC machine. The up-to-date 3D design software allows getting a very high accuracy, planks not requiring any adjustment, except to cut both ends. The hull is planked over a plywood egg box: backbone made of several layers of layers and bulkheads/frames. Buoyancy compartments are made at both ends.

Gabian is lateen rigged, with mainsail and jib. The lateen mainsail stands always on the same side of the mast. The mast is short and easily stepped. It is possible to use the “Catalan” type rig, with the lateen sail only which is changed from one side of the mast to the other when tacking. Then the mast is raked forward, but using the same mast partner. Using the Catalan sail is more complicated but allows to learn all the wealth of this rig used all around the Mediterranean sea in the past.We gave up using a centreboard, not consistent with a mast stepped close to mid-length. The keel has been made high (15 cm), with rocker, to get good upwind performance. Lead ballast (40 kg) is inserted into the plywood keel, which is only 36 mm thick to reduce drag. A water ballast, about 160 litres, gives the boat a displacement hull behavior, very useful if singlehanded. It is suggested to use a trailer without centreline rollers, allowing the hull to lay as low as possible and easing launching and retrieving. The rudder fittings allow to raise the rudder it when beaching.

We gave up using a centreboard, not consistent with a mast stepped close to mid-length. The keel has been made high (15 cm), with rocker, to get good upwind performance. Lead ballast (40 kg) is inserted into the plywood keel, which is only 36 mm thick to reduce drag. A water ballast, about 160 litres, gives the boat a displacement hull behavior, very useful if singlehanded. It is suggested to use a trailer without centreline rollers, allowing the hull to lay as low as possible and easing launching and retrieving. The rudder fittings allow to raise the rudder it when beaching.

The pointed stern makes difficult a motor arrangement. Most Med boats have fixed engines, but they are now very expensive and add weight, not desirable on a trailerable boat. We have studied several way to arrange an outboard, using 3D design. We have finally chosen an off-centered motor well of simple geometry. The owner preferred an electric motor, which is an excellent choice. The Torqeedo travel is light and is easily moved and stowed under side deck when under sail.

The deck arrangement is typical of Mediterranean custom, with a hatch of a moderate width allowing to close the deck with covers. It is possible to sleep on board, as the floorboard is 1.2 m wide. As the boat is almost decked, a simple tent is enough. A large locker is fitted ahead of the mast.

The first Gabian was built between February and July 2015 by Arwen Marine boatbuilder . Then Michel Aubert has made the rigging job. The boat, named Hasta Cipango , has been launched at the end of summer. Her behaviour at sea is very satisfactory, including with bad weather conditions as the Med is able to offer. The 2016 season will show how Gabian compares with other boats.

My intention is to work out this year the building instructions for home builders. If you are interested in building the boat, do not hesitate to get in touch with me. Please note that he study plan is an extract of the building plans and instructions. Therefore, it is not presently available.

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This post has 2 comments.

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Lovely design. Reminiscent of a larger, Italian Leudo, I think. Fast, no doubt. Beautiful work..

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Dear Francois, Living and working in Venezuela we do a lot of sailing along the 3.000 kms coast of Venezuela with the Caribbean. Being in Southern France last summer, I fell in love with the Pointu all along the Var departement. Could you help me out to buy a set of plans to construct a Pointu myself. I consider 5.50 meters as the perfect size for us. Hope to read you soon, Kind regards, Titus P.S If preferred we could write in French as well. T.

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Le poids lège est proche de la définition de masse lège définie par la norme ISO 8666.

C’est le poids du bateau prêt à naviguer avec un armement minimum comprenant la voilure de base, le moteur de puissance moyenne recommandée, une ligne de mouillage et quelques amarres. S’il y a un ballast liquide, il est vide.

Pour les voile-aviron, il n’y a pas de poids moteur mais le poids des avirons. S’il y a plusieurs versions de gréement, je prend la plus simple.

Le poids est susceptible de varier d’un bateau à l’autre en fonction du choix des essences de bois et des équipements choisis.

Il est courant que le poids indiqué sur les documentations d’autres architectes ou chantiers, ou publiés dans la presse, ne soit que celui de la coque seule et parfois même fortement sous estimé. Aussi je vous invite à faire preuve de discernement lors de la comparaison de mes bateaux avec d’autres.

Lire avant de passer commande

Le dossier d’évaluation est un extrait du plan pour en savoir plus avant achat. Donc inutile d’acheter plan et dossier d’évaluation.

Le plan, ou dossier de construction, est le document de base pour construire le bateau. Il comporte dessins, instructions de montage, photos, listes de matériaux et fournitures, etc… Il donne droit à une assistance par email ou téléphone. Le plan doit être acheté pour construire le bateau.

Ce bateau ne peut être construit qu’avec un kit de contreplaqué en découpe numérique ou les tracés vraie grandeur. L’un ou l’autre doivent être acheté en complément du plan. Compte tenu du nombre important de panneaux de contreplaqué, le kit est vivement conseillé.

Vous pouvez aussi commander des fichiers de découpe numérique pour faire découper le kit par une entreprise de votre choix.

Pour commander un kit, s’adresser à l’un de mes partenaires.

Les frais postaux et la TVA, si elle s’applique, sont inclus dans les prix affichés.

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SailboatsToGo offers our own nylon sails, original Snark nylon sails, Sailmaker Neil Pryde dacron sails, white dacron sails, and sails for the Snark Sea Skimmer and Sea Devil. 

Satisfaction guaranteed! Our nylon  sails are very well made durable nylon sails that will fit Super Snark, Sea Snark, Sears Whirlwind, Spring Creek, SailboatsToGo (that's us!),  Paddle ski,  Sea Eagle, and  SOAR .  Our  Snark Sailboat sail is 45 square feet, nylon.  It will fit your Sea Snark or Super Snark just like the original.   A great many Snark owners have bought these from us, we receive many messages from satisfied customers ( see Messages from Customers section below ) and we have never had a single one ask for a refund, but if you're not happy with it, you can be the first!  We also carry original equipment Snark brand nylon sails.  Usually arrives in less than a week.  Very low shipping cost.

Our white dacron and Sailmaker Neil Pryde International dacron sails are more durable and hold their shape better (stretches much less) than nylon in strong winds, which will give you better upwind performance.

These are all true, aerodynamic, shaped sails, which means they are cut and sewn to have the necessary camber (3-dimensional curvature) for creating aerodynamic lift.  They have sleeves for the boom and gaff and cutouts in the right places for tieing on the sheet and halyard and for the mast ring.   

These sails are used on canoes, ice boats, inflatable boats, kayaks and dinghies, in addition to Snark styrofoam boats

All major credit cards and paypal accepted. Address paypal payments & emails to [email protected] .  

Colors and Sizes and Types

Colors:  14 different sail color schemes!    Custom Graphics:   Add your logo to your sail.  $18 per square foot of logo $25 . Email us.  

Sizes :  The 45 square foot ("SF") sails fit Sea Snarks and Super Snarks and some older Sunflowers.  Also the Sears Whirlwind. All Sunflowers built after 1983 (and some older Sunflowers) take the 55 SF sail (scroll farther down this page for 55 SF sail offerings).   Some pre-1983 Sunflowers take the 45 and some take the 55, so that's where we have to take size identification to the next level.   Click Here

We have nylon sails below and we have dacron sails, farther down the page. Dacron is a premium-grade material that is stiffer and less stretchy, so the sail holds its intended shape better, even in strong winds and after years of service.   Within the Dacron category, we have a generic white sail, and we have name-brand Neil Pryde sails in various color schemes.  The Neil Pryde sails have premium-quality workmanship, such as heavier stitching and heavier reinforcement at stress points.

SUPER SNARK and SEA SNARK SAILS (45 square foot)  (also fit Sailboats To Go and Whirlwind)

Rainbow Stripes 45 - $99     (Sail D45) Our most popular!

               

Blue Stripes 45 light/dark blue $99     (Sail B45)

 Spring 45 (Nylon): - $99   (Sail F45)  

 Summer 45: Yellow/White - $99    (Sail C45)

 Zowie 45! - $99    (Sail E2-45) 

 

 

 Pirate 45. Arrrr Matey! $129    (Sail P45)

 

Classic 45 NYLON. Lowest price, same quality. $89   (Sail A45)

Upgrade:  - $128

 

Premium Quality Dacron - Heavier Material, non-stretch

Teal - Yellow - White  by famous sail maker Neil Pryde International

$169 - 

 

SUNFLOWER 3.3 SAILS (55 square foot)  (Also Fits SailboatsToGo)

Do not assume all sunflowers take a 55 sf sail   explanation  .

 Rainbow Stripes 55 - $159    (Sail D55)  Most popular!

 Blue Stripes 55: light/dark blue panels - $129  (Sail B55)

Spring 55 (Nylon): $149     (Sail F55)  Also available in Neil Pryde Brand Dacron.  Scroll down.to next grouping of sails to see.

 Summer 55: Yellow/White. $129    (Sail C55)

Do not assume all Sunflowers take a 55 SF sail!   

 Zowie 55! - $149    (Sail E255)

 Pirate 55. Arrrr Matey! $129   (Sail P55)

     

 

Spring! (Dacron)   $229 

Dacron is a heavier, less stretchy fabric than nylon and this sail also has more reinforcement at stress points for longer life.

 The Classic 55 NYLON. $119   (Sail A55) 

Also available:

NEIL PRYDE INTERNATIONAL DACRON SAILS (45 SQ FT and 55 SQ FT) 

Dacron (polyester) is a stiffer, less stretchy material than nylon.  A Dacron sail will hold its shape and not stretch out in strong winds.  It's also a heavier material and therefore stronger, as compared to nylon.   Neil Pryde is a widely-respected sail maker, known for quality workmanship.  You will be impressed with the extra heavy stitching on these sails, done with the greatest attention to detail.  Shipping cost will show up in your cart.  It's not much (around $10).   For an additional choice in a 45 SF colored Dacron sail see the Blue/White/Yellow OEM Snark Sail above.

  Pastel Corners ("Joy")    $169  

  Red/White     $169    

  Pastel Corners ("Joy")   $229     

  Red/White     $229  

 Blue/Gray Stripes.   $229  

 

  Spring! (Dacron)  $229 

WHITE DACRON SAILS (45 and 55 square foot)

This is a house brand sail (not Neil Pryde) but still very good quality.  As compared to nylon, dacron (polyester) is a stiffer, less stretchy material so the sail will hold its shape and not belly out in strong winds.  More Pictures and info click here .

  Super Snark/Sea Snark -  $128     

 

  Sunflower -   $179  

66 SQUARE FOOT NYLON SAIL.

  66 Square Foot sail  $99    

The 66 square foot sail is both longer and taller on the spars. Spar extensions are needed for both the boom and top spar.  If you already have spars for our 55 square foot sail, you will only need one spar extension:  $20 each.  If you have OEM Sunflower spars, you'll have to devise an extension for the boom.   This link if for extending the boom on SailboatsToGo spars:     Add Spar Extension to Cart  .   

Bag for Sail & Poles-  Great for Car Topping!

Sail, Mast and Spar Bag:  Collect all those poles and ropes and the sail in one long skinny car-toppable bag.  

Heavy duty drawstring bag measures 12' 8" long and about 6 inches in diameter (9 inches wide if empty and flat). Fits our spars, sail and mast without folding them.  . Fits spars, sail and mast (all the aluminum poles, in other words) of Super Snark or Sunflower. Protects the sail from flapping and shredding itself when car-topping. Keeps all these vital parts together in your garage or basement so they don't get lost or forgotten between sailing excursions. Protects sail from sun, wind and rain when stored or transported outside. If you have our folding spars and mast, you don't absolutely need a full length bag like this, but it's a nice option to save the time of folding and unfolding.   

BATWING SAIL

High tech modern design Batwing Sail. Great upwind performance in strong winds.  Reefable by means of zippers.  This is the modern Batwing sail from Balogh Sail Designs and includes a Free mast step that will adapt it to any of our rigs (not Snarks). Includes mast, boom, mast step, sail and rigging.  Available as an upgrade with our Canoe, Kayak, and Dinghy sailkits. (Click the "Upgrades and Options" link within any of those departments)

  Batwing Sail, Mast, Boom, Mast Step, and Rigging 

  

SEA SKIMMER SAILS


$260

 

Appearance will differ from photo.  Main is red and white now.  No options on color choice.  Nylon.
$200

 

Red..  No options on color choice. Nylon material. Jib is solid red, or solid white with a little red trim, or solid blue with a little red and white trim.  Specify in order comments if you care which you get.
$80

 

 

SNARK MAYFLOWER, SUNCHASER I AND SUNCHASER II SAILS

Snark Mayflower Sail
Sail to fit the Snark Mayflower, from the European Snark maker.  The Mayflower is not supported by the USA Snark company, so  we went to Europe.  Sail is shipped direct to you from Europe.

Click here to see photo.

250.00 


71.00
Sunchaser 1 sail
Sail for the Snark Sunchaser I.
430.00 


15.00
Snark Sunchaser II Sails (Main & Jib) 
Both main sail and jib for the Snark Sunchaser 2.
640.00 


20.00

Other items of interest to Snark owners

Spar Set and Mast :  Our unique folding design makes these low shipping costs possible for mast and spar set.  If you go elsewhere, ask about their shipping cost before you order!   (You'll be shocked.)  

Spar Set  The two poles that go in the sail sleeves and the ring that accepts the mast. More Info

Mast: More Info

Stabilizer Pontoons prevent capsizing:   More Info

lateen rigged sailboat for sale

Alternatives to Styrofoam Sailing:  When the rest of your Snark wears out, or even before that, if you want a sailboat that is dryer, more comfortable (back support!) and more portable, check out our inflatable sailboats and canoe sail rigs.  You can use your Snark sail and spars and save!   Click Here For More Information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mast extension for Super Snark, Sunflower or Sea Snark replaces mast cap - SAILBOATS TO GO EXCLUSIVE PRODUCT!
Get more headroom under your boom! This item replaces the mast cap and extends the top of your mast 6 inches.  Or get the item 5209 below for even greater extension possibilities. The mast cap is no longer needed because this extension has a beautiful stainless steel or thermoplastic eye at the top for your halyard. Free shipping in lower 48 states. Having the boom higher also means you can heel over more without the boom hitting the water -- a great benefit for those who like to push the limits for sailing thrills! Fits standard OEM masts, not our own masts. A taller mast makes a big difference in comfort. Theoretically, it reduces stability a little, but the effect is so minor you probably will not even notice it. And, any time you want to revert to the original sail height, that's easily done. 

Taller, Adjustable-Height Extension for Super Snark and Sea Snark Mast
   works the same way as 5211 above but it offers a choice of height settings from zero up to 15 inches of extension.   If you can afford it, this item is the better choice.   Set the sail really high on light wind days and enjoy the luxury of a very high boom.  Set it lower on heavy wind days if you feel it necessary or preferable.

35.00 


0.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

45.00 


0.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Messages from Customers

"Thanks so much for sending the sail out so promptly.  It arrived yesterday.  It's all set up in the backyard right now for my son to see for his birthday present!  It was a pleasure doing business with you."   --   Robyn M.

"Love doing business with your company.  I'm telling all my friends to buy sails from SailboatsToGo!" -- Joe L. 

"...went out yesterday with my daughter. We had a wonderful time and everyone commented on the beauty of the sail. Thanks for your prompt response.  I am very pleased with your sail and service and will recommend you." -- Mark Y.

"The new sail seems to be superior to the old Snark original in both material choice and construction."    Martin M.

"We received the sail for the Snark Sunflower on Wednesday.   Thank you for your prompt replies and shipment of the sail. We installed the sail and took it out last night.  It fit well, and worked well also. My son and I are very pleased with the sail and again thank you for the great response to my inquiries.  This has enabled my son to enjoy the sailboat a few days before he leaves home for 2 months.  I will happily recommend your business to anyone who needs sails and related items. Thank you very much!"  Tom and Seth B.   June 2011

"Hi, Jim - Just a note to let you know I just spent a very enjoyable weekend sailing our Super Snark with the new spar set we ordered earlier this month. Set up went very smoothly, thanks to the excellent set of instructions you supplied. The pictures were especially helpful. I found your spar set to be far superior to the original tubing and fittings that were on our Snark. That mast slide sure instills confidence compared to the flimsly fitting on the original. I hope to enjoy sailing on our pond here on Cape Cod as long as the weather holds up. Thanks again for your prompt service and excellent product." -  Chris

Want more? Read our Ebay Feedback and see how pleased people are with our products and service.  (Our prices here are generally lower than on Ebay, so come back here to make your purchase.)

Use Our Sails in Do-It-Yourself Sailboat Projects

This Snark sail is also a good choice for do-it-yourself sailboat projects, such as ice boats, converting a dinghly you already own, or putting a sail on your canoe or inflatable.   Click on the "Products" link at the top of this page and then on "Plans" to buy plans for canoe sail rig or inflatable sailboat rig that would utilize this sail (although the plans also tell you how to make your own sail if you prefer).  

Interesting Facts About The Snark Sail Design

The Snark Sail is referred to as a "Lateen" style sail, which means the mast is short and the sail has another spar, called a gaff, which carries the peak of the sail up much higher than the top of the mast, with the gaff slightly angled so that the lower front corner of the sail is in front of the mast.   The Lateen style sail originated in ancient times and is still used all over the world on small boats, especially in India and the Arab world.  Those fishing and trading vessels often use rags and old grain sacks stitched together for sail cloth.  A Lateen sail can hold its own against a sloop rig of equal total sail area (sloop rigs have a jib and mainsail) in a race of otherwise equal boats and crews.  Don't believe what some say about jibs increasing the efficiency of the main.  Snark and SailboatsToGo and other users of the Lateen sail plan are continuing a long and proud tradition in sailing. 

dilbar yacht specs

dilbar yacht specs

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dilbar yacht specs

Delivered in 2016, Dilbar is the largest motor yacht in the world by gross tonnage. She is one of the most complex and challenging yachts ever built, in terms of both dimensions and technology. At 15,917 tons, the 156-meter superyacht features entertainment and recreation spaces never before seen on a yacht. These include a 25-meter swimming pool that holds an incredible 180 m³ of water, the largest pool ever to have been installed on a yacht. The exterior design, a classic profile with a light ivory hull and bronze accents, was developed by Espen Øino International. Her spectacular interior, created by the Winch Design team, uses rare and exclusive luxury materials.

dilbar yacht specs

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Alisher Usmanov Dilbar Yacht

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DILBAR Yacht – Glamorous $800M Superyacht

At 156 meters (512 ft), DILBAR yacht is the fifth-longest yacht in the world.

If measured by tonnage, she actually ranks in first place as the largest yacht in the world by interior volume. DILBAR was built by Luerssen in Germany in 2016.

Dilbar Lurssen FV

DILBAR yacht interior

The interior of the DILBAR yacht was designed by Andrew Winch’s studio based in London. Twelve luxury suites can accommodate 24 guests onboard the yacht.

An impressive 96-member crew finds space below deck and tends to every need the guests might have.

The crew can move through the vessel on separate crew passageways to ensure maximum privacy and a luxurious experience.

The superyacht has a gym, sauna, spa, elevator system, beauty salon, and sauna, all for the comfort and entertainment of the guests.

She also has the largest indoor pool ever installed on a yacht, measuring a total length of 25 meters.

The interior of DILBAR features a classical yacht design with beautiful wood elements and opulent furnishings.

Blue and gold accents take the interior design of the impressive superyacht to the next level and have earned her several design awards in the past.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Dilbar-Lurssen-yacht-SV2-1024x1024.jpg

Specifications

The DILBAR yacht has a total length of 156 meters (512 ft), a beam of 25.7 meters (84.4 ft), and a draft of 6 meters (19.8 ft).

She was built in 2016 by the Luerssen shipyard in Lemwerder, Germany and the project took more than four years to complete.

Her tonnage lies at 15,917, but she can still reach top speeds of 23 knots despite her weight. Her average cruising speed lies at 18 knots, and she is powered by twin diesel engines.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Dilbar-Lurssen-yacht-SV1-1024x1024.jpg

DILBAR is a multi-award-winning yacht with an array of unusual features. Her exterior was designed by the Monaco-based studio of Espen Oeino, which has worked on some of the world’s largest yachts.

The exterior of DILBAR is white with bronze and ivory accents to match Usmanov’s other luxury vessels. The yacht has two helipads that can hold Usmanov’s H175 helicopter.

Several sunbathing decks with a great selection of seating areas make this yacht the perfect place to relax and enjoy the stunning sea views.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Dilbar-Lurssen-tender-SV2-1024x1024.jpg

DILBAR yacht for an estimated sales price of US $800 million, although this number could be even higher.

The yacht generates a further US $50 to 80 million in annual running costs.

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dilbar yacht specs

Motor Yacht

Originally known as "Project Omar", the 156 metre superyacht Dilbar was launched in 2016 after over 4 years of construction.

According to her German builder Lurssen's description, Dilbar is one of the most complex and challenging yachts ever built, in terms of both dimensions and technology.

At 15,917 tons, the 156-meter superyacht features entertainment and recreation spaces never before seen on a yacht. These include a 25-meter swimming pool that holds an incredible 180 m³ of water, the largest pool ever to have been installed on a yacht. 

The exterior design, a classic profile with a light ivory hull and bronze accents, was developed by Espen Øino International. Her spectacular interior, created by the Winch Design team, uses rare and exclusive luxury materials.

  • Yacht Builder Lurssen Yachts View profile
  • Naval Architect Lurssen Yachts View profile
  • Exterior Designer Espen Oeino View profile
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Yacht Specs

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The best photos of 156m Lürssen superyacht Dilbar

Dilbar in southampton.

Dilbar was spotted moored at Southampton’s Town Quay earlier this year. The yacht then made its way across the English Channel and the North Sea to Germany. Delivered in 2016,  Dilbar  features exterior design by Espen Øino with interiors by Andrew Winch .

Dilbar Underway

Dilbar was later seen underway for Hamburg to begin a refit at the its home yard Lürssen . Dilbar has an total interior volume of 15,917GT and features a 180 cubic metre swimming pool believed to be the largest on any yacht.

Dilbar at Anchor

Here, Dilbar is seen at anchor in the Mediterranean following her delivery voyage in 2016.

Dilbar on Sea Trials

Previously known as Project Omar, Dilbar is seen here embarking on sea trials after first hitting the water in 2015. 

Dilbar Under Construction

This timelapse video showing the construction of the 156 metre superyacht Dilbar was released by Lürssen to mark the delivery of the superyacht. The footage shows construction underway on the hull and superstructure prior to launch and aerial footage of the record-breaking yacht on her delivery trip.

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DILBAR // Lürssen // Espen Øino

Lürssen yachts built the best motor yacht of the year 2016 - dilbar.

DILBAR (also known as Project OMAR), the biggest yacht by volume received the award “Motor Yacht of the Year” and in the category “Displacement Motoryacht 3,000 GT and Above” in Florence. The longest yacht is Azzam with 180m.

“One of the most complex and challenging yachts to be built,” the judges described her “as the most spectacular yacht they had ever seen and a clear winner for this prestigious award.”

The yacht has two helipads. One is on the bow, the other one aft on the top deck and is the home of an Airbus 175 – one of the largest VIP helicopters in the world – custom designed by Pegasus Design.

The diesel-electric propulsion with six Wärtsilä generators delivers a power of 30,000 kW (40,320 HP) to power DILBAR up to a top speed of 22.5 knots. Lürssen construed her with a steel hull and an aluminum superstructure.

This vessel is the successor of the previous DILBAR that is now known as RAYA (ex ONA). The home of the sand-colored yacht is the superyacht port in Barcelona.

Interior of DILBAR

There are no public interior pictures to respect the owner’s privacy, but a few data is available. The Winch-designed interior offers a space of 3,800 square meters for the owner and his guests. There are 20 cabins to welcome 36 guests . Up to 96 crew members can find place onboard. Moreover, the yacht features a 25m swimming pool with a water capacity of 180,000 liters .

Motor Yacht DILBAR Lürssen

© René of yachtemoceans

Motor Yacht DILBAR Lürssen

© Yvan Grubski

Motor Yacht DILBAR Lürssen

© Chris Suffeleers

Motor Yacht DILBAR Lürssen

© Jeff Brown of Breed Media

Dilbar - The Making Of

Main specifications of dilbar.

Length Overall

Gross Tonnage

SHARING IS CARING - THANK YOU!

90m concept // abdulbaki senol, 109m oceanco ready for outfitting, project sleigh rider // lateral naval architects, nataly // benetti yachts, sy300 (90m) by philippe briand, esense // wally, stella – 50m by red yacht design and mengi yay yachts, alfa 50 // rossinavi // enrico gobbi – team for design.

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Dilbar – the world’s largest super yacht

Dilbar – the world’s largest super yacht launched on 14 November 2015 at the Lürssen shipyard.

It was built as Project Omar. The interior design of Dilbar was designed by Andrew Winch. The exterior by Espen Oeino.

As of 2020, Dilbar Mega Yacht is the sixth longest yacht in the world. At 15,917 gross tons, it is the third largest yacht by volume, after Fulk Al Salamah and REV Ocean.

The length of the yacht is 156 m, with a beam of 24 m and a draft of 6.1 m.

Dilbar features a displacement steel hull with an aluminium superstructure. High quality teak is the selected material for decks. This yacht meets “Lloyd’s Register classification society rules”. Also, Dilbar meets “Safety of Life at Sea” requirements. Her flag state is Cayman Islands.

These include a 25-meter swimming pool that holds an incredible 180 m³ of water, the largest pool ever to have been installed on a yacht. Espen Øino International was exterior designer. Her spectacular interior, created by the Winch Design team, uses rare and exclusive luxury materials.

We know that it has two hellipads and 41,000 square feet of living space, but beyond that, details on the yacht are few and far between.

Dilbar, the world’s largest super yacht owner

Dilbar was custom-built for Alisher Usmanov, a 62-year-old Russian billionaire who is one of Arsenal FC’s largest shareholders. Usmanov has an estimated networth of $13.4 billion USD, making him one of Russia’s richest citizens. The billionaire’s new yacht completed sea trials earlier in the year and was recently spotted around Gibraltar and France. Unfortunately, as is the case with many vessels custom built for the super-rich, the details of Dilbar’s interior and amenities remain a secret.

Other Opinion

By itself, a personal helicopter is a fact already speaking about the viability of its owner, and here he is like a small detail. Well, a helicopter and a helicopter.

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dilbar yacht specs

Ukraine invasion — explained

The roots of Russia's invasion of Ukraine go back decades and run deep. The current conflict is more than one country fighting to take over another; it is — in the words of one U.S. official — a shift in "the world order." Here are some helpful stories to make sense of it all.

Germany seizes the world's largest yacht (at least according to volume)

Rachel Treisman

dilbar yacht specs

The luxury superyacht Dilbar sails off the coast of Monaco in 2017. Valery Hache/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

The luxury superyacht Dilbar sails off the coast of Monaco in 2017.

German authorities have seized the world's largest yacht by volume after determining that a Russian oligarch had transferred its ownership to his sister — who is also facing Western sanctions.

Dilbar, the yacht in question, measures some 511 feet and 15,917 tons, which shipbuilder Lurssen says makes it the largest motor yacht in the world by gross tonnage. It has two helipads and one of the biggest indoor pools ever installed on a yacht, according to the U.S. Treasury Department , which puts its estimated worth between $600 and $735 million.

Why so many Russian billionaires are called oligarchs

Why so many Russian billionaires are called oligarchs

The superyacht is named after the mother of its original owner: Alisher Usmanov, one of Russia's wealthiest billionaires and a known close associate of the Russian president. Usmanov was sanctioned by the U.S., United Kingdom., European Union and Switzerland in March, following Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

Germany's federal police tweeted Wednesday that it found, "through extensive investigations despite offshore concealment," that the yacht currently belongs to Usmanov's sister, Gulbakhor Ismailova. Authorities impounded the yacht, which remains at the port of Hamburg , after confirming with Brussels that its owner is under sanctions.

A Russian billionaire's superyacht has been impounded in Hamburg, Germany. Harsh sanctions in response to the invasion of #Ukraine brought the estimated $600-750 million yacht Dilbar out of 'offshore concealment', and into the hands of authorities. pic.twitter.com/GYkH6SmQk2 — German Embassy (@GermanyinUSA) April 14, 2022

Ismailova was sanctioned by the U.K. on Wednesday and the EU last week. Both entities said Usmanov had indirectly transferred assets to his sister, including leaving her as Dilbar's only beneficial owner.

"The owner of the yacht 'Dilbar' is Navis Marine Ltd. (Cayman Islands), whose shareholder is Almenor Holdings Ltd. (Cyprus). All shares in that holding company are held by PomerolCapital SA (Switzerland) in trust for the benefit of 'The Sisters Trust,' " EU officials explained, adding that Usmanov has not been a shareholder of that trust company since 2017.

A Russian oligarch's $90 million yacht is seized as part of U.S. sanctions

National Security

A russian oligarch's $90 million yacht is seized as part of u.s. sanctions.

Ukrainian sailors tried to block a Russian oligarch's yacht from docking in Turkey

Ukrainian sailors tried to block a Russian oligarch's yacht from docking in Turkey

Ismailova has also been linked to luxury real estate in Italy and Latvia associated with Usmanov, the EU said, and therefore has "actively supported materially or financially Russian decision-makers responsible for the annexation of Crimea and the destabilisation of Ukraine."

Dilbar made headlines in early March , when Hamburg officials denied conflicting reports that they had seized the superyacht and said any such move would have to come from higher federal customs authorities.

According to Boat International, Dilbar is also the fourth-longest yacht in the world. It can accommodate up to 96 crew members as well as 24 guests in a large living space, which includes fold-out balconies, an onboard garden (with "a specifically developed variety of grass that tolerates salt air") and more than 1,000 custom-made sofa cushions.

This story originally appeared in the Morning Edition live blog .

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Dilbar: 7 Facts

dilbar yacht specs

You’ve probably all heard of the yacht “Dilbar”. She is, after all, the world’s biggest yacht! Dilbar was built by Lurssen in Bremen, Germany. A feat of engineering, she is absolutely unbelievable. Just check out these stats.

Dilbar

1. Dilbar has a displacement tonnage of 1230: equal to around 186 Elephants .

Your average African Bush Elephant weighs just over 6000kg. There are (more or less) 907 kg in one US ton.

So, if we know that an elephant weighs 6.62 tons, we can also conclude that Dilbar is truly as heavy as a whole load of Elephants.

2. She has a colossal amount of cabling onboard…

…1,100 km worth to be exact; which is longer than the drive from the very North to the southern-most point of France (a mere 962km). For a yacht 156m long and 23m wide, that’s seriously impressive. Ooh-la-la! ??

3. Owner & Guest living space onboard is spread over 3,800 square metres, or 104 London apartments .

According to the Guardian newspaper, the average London flat covers 46 square metres- meaning Dilbar is much, much larger than your flat (and your friend’s flats, and their parents flats, and their neighbors flats, all rolled into one).????

4. Lurssen says that the 156m Dilbar only took 52 months to build.

To put this into perspective, it took around 100,000 slaves over 20 years to build the Great Pyramid : a stone structure of average height with no diesel engines or advanced audio-visual system.

5. Reportedly, you could actually fit the owner’s previous boat ONA inside Dilbar with space to spare.

This one doesn’t need much more explaining. The owner is Russian though, so it could be that he’s playing some sort of yacht-version of matryoshka dolls… ??

6. There’s a 25m swimming pool onboard, which is the largest superyacht pool in existence.

Dilbar has a beam (width) of 23m and a draft (depth below the water) of 6m, so this pool is relatively massive! Our sources tell us that the pool is around 6m across and around 2m deep, falling to 1m at the shallow end. Therefore we can perform a variable depth calculation to find the volume- which results in an estimated requirement of 225,000 liters of water to fill the Dilbar swimming pool.

Now, a typical Shell or BP Oil Truck can hold 11,000L (see where I’m going here…?). You would need 21 Oil Trucks filled with water just to fill the Dilbar swimming pool.

What’s even more incredible is that, due to the pesky free-surface effect, this pool probably has to be drained every time the boat is moved in order to maintain stability. The watermakers onboard would have to work at an incredible speed and efficiency to get this filled in time for the owner to take a dip once the anchor is dropped!

7. You definitely wouldn’t know all of your colleagues for quite some time if you were new onboard Dilbar…

The average human (never mind a hardworking yacht crew member) consumes 2kg of food a day. This means that the Dilbar chefs cook a whopping 73,000 kg worth of crew meals a year to keep their hungry colleagues’ ship shape and ready for work.

Mind-blowing.

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DILBAR yacht NOT for charter*

156m  /  511'10 | lurssen | 2016.

  • Amenities & Toys

Special Features:

  • Elevator for easy access between floors
  • Impressive 6,000nm range
  • Multi-award winning
  • Cinema Room
  • Generous pool

The multi-award winning 156m/511'10" motor yacht 'Dilbar' was built by Lurssen in Germany at their Lemwerder shipyard. Her interior is styled by British designer design house Winch Design and she was delivered to her owner in May 2016. This luxury vessel's exterior design is the work of Espen Oeino.

Guest Accommodation

Dilbar has been designed to comfortably accommodate up to 24 guests in 12 suites. She is also capable of carrying up to 96 crew onboard to ensure a relaxed luxury yacht experience.

Onboard Comfort & Entertainment

Her features include separate crew passageway, movie theatre, beauty salon, elevator, underwater lights, gym and air conditioning.

Range & Performance

Dilbar is built with a steel hull and aluminium superstructure, with teak decks. Powered by twin diesel-electric Wartsila (Electric Motor) 16,092hp engines running at 200rpm, she comfortably cruises at 18 knots, reaches a maximum speed of 22 knots with a range of up to 6,000 nautical miles from her 1,049,700 litre fuel tanks at 16 knots. Dilbar features at-anchor stabilizers providing exceptional comfort levels. Her water tanks store around 112,000 Litres of fresh water. She was built to Lloyds Register ✠ 100A1, PASSENGER SHIP, SHIPRIGHT (ACS(B), SDA, CM) ✠ LMC, UMS classification society rules.

*Charter Dilbar Motor Yacht

Motor yacht Dilbar is currently not believed to be available for private Charter. To view similar yachts for charter , or contact your Yacht Charter Broker for information about renting a luxury charter yacht.

Dilbar Yacht Owner, Captain or marketing company

'Yacht Charter Fleet' is a free information service, if your yacht is available for charter please contact us with details and photos and we will update our records.

Dilbar Photos

Dilbar Yacht

Dilbar Awards & Nominations

  • The World Superyacht Awards 2017 Motor Yacht of the Year Winner
  • The World Superyacht Awards 2017 Best Displacement Motor Yacht of 3,000GT and above (approximately 85m+) Winner
  • International Superyacht Society Awards 2017 Best Power 65m+ Nomination

NOTE to U.S. Customs & Border Protection

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DILBAR Lurssen

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DILBAR has 27 Photos

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Dilbar news.

In Video: 156m mega yacht DILBAR docked at Lurssen

In Video: 156m mega yacht DILBAR docked ...

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If you have any questions about the DILBAR information page below please contact us .

The impressive mega yacht DILBAR (ex.PROJECT OMAR) was built by German shipyard Lürssen over a period of 52 months and launched in 2016 for Russian billionaire Owner Alisher Usmanov. Constructed with a steel hull and aluminium superstructure, this 156m/512ft vessel became the world's largest luxury yacht by volume at her launch, boasting a 23.5m/77.2ft beam 15,917 GT interior spanning seven decks. The exterior styling and interiors are the work of award-winning designers Espen Oeino and Winch Design respectively, and the accommodation sleeps up to 36 guests across 20 en-suite cabins, with a crew of approximately 100 to ensure smooth operations on board.

NOTABLE FEATURES OF DILBAR: ~Award-winning designers ~Massive 25m/82ft long swimming pool ~Sizeable fold-down side terraces ~World's largest luxury yacht by volume ~Sundeck aft and foredeck helipads ~Accommodation for up to 36 guests in 20 en-suite staterooms ~Top speed of 22.5 knots ~Air conditioning ~Wi-Fi

The lower deck swim platform provides an area for guests to sunbathe beside the water as well as easy access in and out of the tenders and other water toys. Two staircases join to the deck above, where there is a viewing platform that can be laid out with chairs or sun loungers to take in the aft views.

The upper deck is the equivalent of a main deck and the C-shaped stern section is lined with seating as well as two circular corner tables for drinks and casual meals in the sunshine.

The bridge deck aft has tapered glass sides to shade from the wind of blustery days to allow guests to sit comfortably outside and enjoy the elevated aft views from the side seating.

Few details are currently known about this secretive private yacht: The interior volume is 15,917 GT and provides 3,800m²/40,902ft² of living space to guests on board.

DILBAR Specifications

A 25m/82ft-long swimming pool is installed on board and has a 6m/19.7ft wide beam, a maximum depth of 2m/6.6ft and a minimum of 1m/3.3ft.

The engines provide a maximum speed of 22.5 knots.

Yacht Accommodation

The accommodation is designed to sleep a maximum of 36 guests over 20 en-suite cabins, which include a Master stateroom. The crew of approximately 100 will provide first-class service to every guest on board.

Amenities and Extras

We do have available further amenity, owner and price information for the 156m (512') yacht DILBAR, so please enquire for more information.

DILBAR Disclaimer:

The luxury yacht DILBAR displayed on this page is merely informational and she is not necessarily available for yacht charter or for sale, nor is she represented or marketed in anyway by CharterWorld. This web page and the superyacht information contained herein is not contractual. All yacht specifications and informations are displayed in good faith but CharterWorld does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the current accuracy, completeness, validity, or usefulness of any superyacht information and/or images displayed. All boat information is subject to change without prior notice and may not be current.

Quick Enquiry

"I once had a client who told me, “I will put your name on the side of my boat if it’s good, but if the boat is not good, your name will appear three times as big.” We were brought up with the sense that it is a very personal obligation for the family when we sign a contract to deliver a yacht that the client expects. I cannot go to a client and say “One of my guys made a mistake.” He would say “Is he Mr. Lürssen, or are you Mr. Lürssen?” But a successful delivery is also a great reward. I take the relationships of my clients very personally." - Peter Lürssen of Lürssen Yachts (courtesy SuperYachtTimes)

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dilbar yacht specs

The yacht Dilbar is a stunning 157-meter (512 ft) superyacht, built by the renowned German shipyard Lurssen. ... Specifications. Constructed with a steel hull and an aluminum superstructure, Dilbar is powered by six power plants, generating a total horsepower of 40,000 hp.

Dilbar (Persian: دلبر, literally "Beloved") is a super-yacht launched on 14 November 2015 at the German Lürssen shipyard and delivered in 2016. She was built as Project Omar.The interior design of Dilbar was designed by Andrew Winch and the exterior by Espen Oeino.. As of 2022, Dilbar is the sixth longest yacht in the world.At 15,917 gross tonnage (GT), she is the third largest yacht by ...

Delivered in 2016, Dilbar is the largest motor yacht in the world by gross tonnage. She is one of the most complex and challenging yachts ever built, in terms of both dimensions and technology. At 15,917 tons, the 156-meter superyacht features entertainment and recreation spaces never before seen on a yacht. These include a 25-meter swimming ...

Dilbar Specifications. Overview Name. Dilbar Type. Motor Model. Custom Sub Type - Year. 2016 Flag - MCA - Class. Lloyds Hull NB - Hull Colour ... Yacht Specs. Guests-Speed-Cabins-Beam-Crew-Draft-See more specs Rank #6. 2024 Forecasted rank: #7 View top 100 Other Lurssen yachts

3. The largest yacht in the world by gross tonnage. While the title of largest yacht in the world by length goes to the 180.61 metre Azzam, the 156 metre Dilbar has the greatest interior volume of any yacht ever delivered, boasting an impressive gross tonnage of 15,917. This translates into 3,800 square metres of living space for 24 guests styled by Winch Design with rare and exclusive luxury ...

At 156 metres (512 ft), Alisher Usmanov's DILBAR yacht is the fifth longest yacht in the world. If measured by tonnage, she actually ranks in first place as .. Superyachts; Luxury Yachts; ... Specifications. The DILBAR yacht has a total length of 156 meters (512 ft), a beam of 25.7 meters (84.4 ft), and a draft of 6 meters (19.8 ft).

The multi-award winning 156m/511'10" motor yacht 'Dilbar' was built by Lurssen in Germany at their Lemwerder shipyard. Her interior is styled by British designer design house Winch Design and she was delivered to her owner in May 2016. This luxury vessel's exterior design is the work of Espen Oeino.

DILBAR is a 156.0 m Motor Yacht, built in Germany by Lurssen and delivered in 2016. Her top speed is 22.5 kn and her power comes from a diesel electric engine. She can accommodate up to 24 guests in 12 staterooms, with 96 crew members. She has a gross tonnage of 15917.0 GT and a 23.5 m beam. She was designed by Espen Oeino International, who ...

Motor Yacht. Originally known as "Project Omar", the 156 metre superyacht Dilbar was launched in 2016 after over 4 years of construction. According to her German builder Lurssen's description, Dilbar is one of the most complex and challenging yachts ever built, in terms of both dimensions and technology. At 15,917 tons, the 156-meter superyacht ...

Features. Dilbar basically makes anyone cluck their tongue in admiration at the mere sight of it. It is tiring to be amazed by all she has onboard, but most impressive is her 25 metre swimming pool, with an incredible 180 cubic metres of water - unheard of on any other boat. The diesel-electric propulsion system, hitherto unprecedented in the ...

At 15,917GT the Lürssen yacht Dilbar is considered one of the largest yachts in volume. Originally known as Project Omar, the 156-metre Dilbar yacht was launched in 2016 after nearly four and a half years in-build. ... Dilbar Yacht Specifications. dimensions. overall length. 156.0 m. beam. 25.7 m. draught max. 6.0 m. gross tonnage. 15,917 ...

The spectacular footage provides a behind-the-scenes glimpse of DILBAR under construction at the Lurssen shipyard as well as aerial shots of her 2,000nm delivery passage to the Mediterranean.. DILBAR is now the world's largest yacht with a gross tonnage of 15,917 tons, surpassing superyacht 'Al Said', a fellow build from the shipyard measuring in at 15,850 tons.

Dilbar is a 156 m / 511′10″ luxury motor yacht. She was built by Lurssen in 2016. With a beam of 23.5 m and a draft of 6 m, she has a steel hull and aluminium superstructure. This adds up to a gross tonnage of 15917 tons. She is powered by engines giving her a maximum speed of 22.5 knots. The motor yacht can accommodate guests in cabins with an interior design by Andrew Winch and an ...

Dilbar Under Construction. This timelapse video showing the construction of the 156 metre superyacht Dilbar was released by Lürssen to mark the delivery of the superyacht. The footage shows construction underway on the hull and superstructure prior to launch and aerial footage of the record-breaking yacht on her delivery trip. Dilbar was built ...

DILBAR (also known as Project OMAR), the biggest yacht by volume received the award "Motor Yacht of the Year" and in the category "Displacement Motoryacht 3,000 GT and Above" in Florence. The longest yacht is Azzam with 180m. "One of the most complex and challenging yachts to be built," the judges described her "as the most spectacular yacht they had ever seen and a clear winner ...

After several years near the top of the list of the world's largest yachts, the Dilbar name leapfrogged onto the number spot with the delivery of the 156-meter behemoth that is now the fleet's flagship. One of yachting's most anticipated projects ever, Dilbar was launched in 2016 and boasted a gross tonnage of 15,917 confirmed by the shipyard.

The length of the yacht is 156 m, with a beam of 24 m and a draft of 6.1 m. Dilbar features a displacement steel hull with an aluminium superstructure. High quality teak is the selected material for decks. This yacht meets "Lloyd's Register classification society rules". Also, Dilbar meets "Safety of Life at Sea" requirements.

The luxury superyacht Dilbar sails off the coast of Monaco in 2017. German authorities have seized the world's largest yacht by volume after determining that a Russian oligarch had transferred its ...

6. There's a 25m swimming pool onboard, which is the largest superyacht pool in existence. Dilbar has a beam (width) of 23m and a draft (depth below the water) of 6m, so this pool is relatively massive! Our sources tell us that the pool is around 6m across and around 2m deep, falling to 1m at the shallow end. Therefore we can perform a ...

Download the full charter brochure for luxury Motor Yacht "DILBAR" to explore her beautiful interiors, guest accommodation and full range of amenities as well as outdoor living spaces. This comprehensive overview provides the best way to get a feel for the charter experience on offer and gives detailed and accurate specifications so that you can match them up to your own requirements.

The impressive mega yacht DILBAR (ex.PROJECT OMAR) was built by German shipyard Lürssen over a period of 52 months and launched in 2016 for Russian billionaire Owner Alisher Usmanov. DILBAR Lurssen. ... All yacht specifications and informations are displayed in good faith but CharterWorld does not warrant or assume any legal liability or ...

The 512-foot yacht worth nearly $600 million has been stuck in a shipyard in the German port city of Hamburg since October for a refitting job. Usmanov, an early investor in Facebook, was ...

#dilbaryacht, #superycht, #megayachtWhen googling for Dilbar yacht, you may be surprised to know that there have been three Dilbar yachts starting from 2005....

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Savvino-storozhevsky monastery and museum.

Savvino-Storozhevsky Monastery and Museum

Zvenigorod's most famous sight is the Savvino-Storozhevsky Monastery, which was founded in 1398 by the monk Savva from the Troitse-Sergieva Lavra, at the invitation and with the support of Prince Yury Dmitrievich of Zvenigorod. Savva was later canonised as St Sabbas (Savva) of Storozhev. The monastery late flourished under the reign of Tsar Alexis, who chose the monastery as his family church and often went on pilgrimage there and made lots of donations to it. Most of the monastery’s buildings date from this time. The monastery is heavily fortified with thick walls and six towers, the most impressive of which is the Krasny Tower which also serves as the eastern entrance. The monastery was closed in 1918 and only reopened in 1995. In 1998 Patriarch Alexius II took part in a service to return the relics of St Sabbas to the monastery. Today the monastery has the status of a stauropegic monastery, which is second in status to a lavra. In addition to being a working monastery, it also holds the Zvenigorod Historical, Architectural and Art Museum.

Belfry and Neighbouring Churches

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Located near the main entrance is the monastery's belfry which is perhaps the calling card of the monastery due to its uniqueness. It was built in the 1650s and the St Sergius of Radonezh’s Church was opened on the middle tier in the mid-17th century, although it was originally dedicated to the Trinity. The belfry's 35-tonne Great Bladgovestny Bell fell in 1941 and was only restored and returned in 2003. Attached to the belfry is a large refectory and the Transfiguration Church, both of which were built on the orders of Tsar Alexis in the 1650s.  

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To the left of the belfry is another, smaller, refectory which is attached to the Trinity Gate-Church, which was also constructed in the 1650s on the orders of Tsar Alexis who made it his own family church. The church is elaborately decorated with colourful trims and underneath the archway is a beautiful 19th century fresco.

Nativity of Virgin Mary Cathedral

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The Nativity of Virgin Mary Cathedral is the oldest building in the monastery and among the oldest buildings in the Moscow Region. It was built between 1404 and 1405 during the lifetime of St Sabbas and using the funds of Prince Yury of Zvenigorod. The white-stone cathedral is a standard four-pillar design with a single golden dome. After the death of St Sabbas he was interred in the cathedral and a new altar dedicated to him was added.

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Under the reign of Tsar Alexis the cathedral was decorated with frescoes by Stepan Ryazanets, some of which remain today. Tsar Alexis also presented the cathedral with a five-tier iconostasis, the top row of icons have been preserved.

Tsaritsa's Chambers

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The Nativity of Virgin Mary Cathedral is located between the Tsaritsa's Chambers of the left and the Palace of Tsar Alexis on the right. The Tsaritsa's Chambers were built in the mid-17th century for the wife of Tsar Alexey - Tsaritsa Maria Ilinichna Miloskavskaya. The design of the building is influenced by the ancient Russian architectural style. Is prettier than the Tsar's chambers opposite, being red in colour with elaborately decorated window frames and entrance.

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At present the Tsaritsa's Chambers houses the Zvenigorod Historical, Architectural and Art Museum. Among its displays is an accurate recreation of the interior of a noble lady's chambers including furniture, decorations and a decorated tiled oven, and an exhibition on the history of Zvenigorod and the monastery.

Palace of Tsar Alexis

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The Palace of Tsar Alexis was built in the 1650s and is now one of the best surviving examples of non-religious architecture of that era. It was built especially for Tsar Alexis who often visited the monastery on religious pilgrimages. Its most striking feature is its pretty row of nine chimney spouts which resemble towers.

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Location approximately 2km west of the city centre
Website Monastery - http://savvastor.ru Museum - http://zvenmuseum.ru/

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    Princesa do Tejo got a new set of sails including Main sail, Jib and Mizzen sail.A Lateen rigged sailboat with new sails is something else! The first time it...

  9. Lateen sail

    lateen sail, triangular sail that was of decisive importance to medieval navigation.The ancient square sail permitted sailing only before the wind; the lateen was the earliest fore-and-aft sail.The triangular sail was affixed to a long yard or crossbar, mounted at its middle to the top of the mast and angled to extend aft far above the mast and forward down nearly to the deck.

  10. Lateen

    Rigs: Lateen. Lateen. ... Also available with a sloop rig. Called the Sunchaser II Main: 80 sqft Jib: 20 sqft. The Sandpiper 80 (SA = 80 sqft) is the same hull with a Marconi cat rig. Also referred to as the Super Snark 2. ... The SUPER SAILFISH MKII, (1949-1975) was the first fiberglass boat from Alcort. Drawing from Sears Catalogue.

  11. The 5 Best Sailboats For Beginners

    This rig consists of a mast, boom, and spar, along with a single halyard and mainsheet. With only two ropes in its simplest configuration, the Lateen Rig makes an excellent starter sailboat, and it will be featured on this list. For larger boats, the Bermuda Sloop rig is an excellent choice.

  12. Lateen Sails

    A lateen is type of rig used on sailing vessels, featuring a triangular sail held up on side side by a long wooden spar called a "yard". The yard mounts at roughly a 45-degree angle to the mast, running forward and aft. The very first examples of the lateen sail crop up in the Mediterranean around the 2 nd century AD, but the lateen didn ...

  13. The Lateen Sail

    THE LATEEN RIG. The traditional lateen rig is characterized by its large triangular sail and the long, curved yard that carries the sail.This yard, reflecting the arid environment of the sail's origin which is devoid of tall trees, is made by using several separate spars, overlapping each other, then "fished" and lashed together, making ...

  14. 1985 AMF Sunfish

    AMF Sunfish, 1985 sailboat for sale Excellent Condition (Garage Kept) Price: $2,200. Description: This Sunfish Sailboat is 13'9" long and 4'1" wide. It weighs 120 Lbs +/- and has a fiberglass hull with a foot well and storage compartment. The sail is lateen rigged on an aluminum mast and spars.

  15. Guide to Understanding Sail Rig Types (with Pictures)

    The polacca or polacre rig has three masts with a square-rigged foremast. The main and mizzenmast are lateen-rigged. Beautiful boat to see. Polacca literally means 'Polish' (it's Italian). It was a popular rig type in the Mediterranean in the 17th century. It looks like the xebec, which has three lateen-rigged masts.

  16. Lateen Sail Question, I'm Sure There's a Reason

    Aug 24, 2020. #1. New poster here with a question. I sail small boats and favor the simplicity of the lateen rig. I am currently converting a boat to a lateen rig and wondered why I have never seen one with the spars mounted to the mast at the apex (or very front of the yard/boom). This would certainly eliminate the "bad side of the mast ...

  17. Lateen

    A lateen (from French latine, meaning "Latin") or latin-rig is a triangular sail set on a long yard mounted at an angle on the mast, and running in a fore-and-aft direction. The settee can be considered to be an associated type of the same overall category of sail.. The lateen originated in the Mediterranean as early as the 2nd century AD, during Roman times, and became common there by the 5th ...

  18. Gabian: a lateen rigged boat

    Gabian is lateen rigged, with mainsail and jib. The lateen mainsail stands always on the same side of the mast. The mast is short and easily stepped. It is possible to use the "Catalan" type rig, with the lateen sail only which is changed from one side of the mast to the other when tacking. Then the mast is raked forward, but using the same ...

  19. Sailboats To Go » Sails for Snark and Sunflower Sailboats Sold Here

    Those fishing and trading vessels often use rags and old grain sacks stitched together for sail cloth. A Lateen sail can hold its own against a sloop rig of equal total sail area (sloop rigs have a jib and mainsail) in a race of otherwise equal boats and crews. Don't believe what some say about jibs increasing the efficiency of the main.

  20. rigging a precision 15 sailboat

    Dad and I out sailing the P15 on a nice calm day.... Precision preowned sailboats for sale by owner. Precision used sailboats for sale by owner. Home. ... Sailboat Added 15-Jul-2018 More Details: Precision 23.5: Length: 23.5' Beam: 8.9' Draft: 5.1' Year: 2016: ... 17' owner built Gaff rig cutter Schenectady SCOTIA, New York Asking $12,000. 31 ...

  21. guppy 13 sailboat for sale

    Guppy 13 sailboat for sale. The Guppy is a fiberglass boat with a shoal draft keel, and sleeps 2 adults in a 6 ft 8 in long cabin. LOA 12'6". Beam 5'7". Displacement 480 lb empty with 150 lb of ballast. Draft 1'7". It has a Bermuda rig consisting of a 32 square feet high aspect main sail and a 48 square feet jib....

  22. Ewf b.v East West Forwarding

    EWF B.V EAST WEST FORWARDING. Edelveis, Right Entrance, 2nd Floor Davidkovskaja, 121352 Moscow, Russia. Phone: +7 495 938-99-66; Mobile: +7 495-997-0977

  23. Savvino-Storozhevsky Monastery and Museum

    Zvenigorod's most famous sight is the Savvino-Storozhevsky Monastery, which was founded in 1398 by the monk Savva from the Troitse-Sergieva Lavra, at the invitation and with the support of Prince Yury Dmitrievich of Zvenigorod. Savva was later canonised as St Sabbas (Savva) of Storozhev. The monastery late flourished under the reign of Tsar ...