Boat Pursuits Logo

What Size Yacht To Cross The Atlantic? (Here’s What You Need to Know)

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Crossing the Atlantic in a yacht is an ambitious but rewarding endeavor.

Whether youre a recreational sailor or a seasoned professional, the size of the yacht you choose will make a world of difference on the journey.

Before you set sail, you need to consider a number of factors, such as the number of people on board, the size and type of crew, the length of the voyage, fuel and crew requirements, route of crossing, weather conditions, and emergency services available.

In this article, well cover all these topics and more to help you find the right size yacht for your Atlantic crossing.

Table of Contents

Short Answer

The size of yacht needed to safely and comfortably cross the Atlantic Ocean will depend on factors such as the number of people on board, the type of voyage, and the experience of the captain and crew.

Generally, the vessel should be a minimum of 36 feet in length and have enough stowage capacity to carry enough supplies and provisions for the voyage.

The yacht should also be outfitted with the necessary navigation, communication, and safety equipment to make the voyage.

Lastly, it should be well-maintained to ensure reliable performance throughout the voyage.

What To Consider When Choosing A Yacht Size

When deciding what size yacht to choose for an Atlantic crossing, there are several key factors to consider.

The number of people on board, the size and type of the crew, and the length of the voyage will all factor into the size of yacht you need.

A larger yacht will provide more space and comfort, but will also require more fuel and crew to manage.

It’s also important to consider the route of the crossing, the type of weather that is expected, and the type of emergency services available along the way.

The size of yacht should also be determined by the purpose of the crossing and the preferences of the crew.

For instance, if the purpose of the voyage is primarily recreational and the crew is smaller, then a smaller yacht may be more suitable.

On the other hand, if the purpose is more commercial and the crew is larger, then a larger yacht may be the better choice.

The type of vessel is also important.

Sailboats, motorboats, and catamarans all have different requirements for size, fuel efficiency, and crew.

For instance, sailboats require larger masts and rigging, which can limit the size of the vessel.

Motorboats, on the other hand, can be larger and can travel faster, although they also require more fuel.

Catamarans are typically the largest vessels, but they also require the most crew and are the most difficult to maneuver in rough seas.

Finally, the length of the voyage is an important factor.

A longer voyage requires more fuel, supplies, and crew, so a larger yacht may be necessary.

Additionally, a longer voyage may require more sophisticated navigational and safety equipment, so it’s important to consider the type of emergency services available along the route.

In conclusion, choosing the right size yacht for an Atlantic crossing requires careful consideration of several factors.

The number of people on board, the size and type of the crew, the length of the voyage, the route, the type of weather, and the type of emergency services available all need to be taken into account.

Ultimately, the decision should be based on the purpose of the voyage and the preferences of the crew.

Number Of People On Board

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

When deciding on the size of yacht to choose for an Atlantic crossing, the number of people who will be on board should be the first factor taken into consideration.

The size of the yacht should be able to comfortably accommodate the number of passengers and crew members, with enough space for sleeping, eating, and lounging.

Any extra space that may be needed for storage should also be taken into account.

It is important to note that larger yachts will require more fuel and crew to manage, and may be more expensive to maintain.

Therefore, it is important to make sure that the size of the yacht matches the needs of the voyage and the crew.

Size And Type Of Crew

When selecting the size of your yacht for an Atlantic crossing, it’s important to consider the size and type of the crew.

If there will be a large number of people on board, a larger yacht is likely required to provide enough room and comfort.

On the other hand, a smaller yacht may be more suitable for a smaller crew.

Additionally, the size and type of crew will determine the type of personnel needed to manage the yacht.

For example, it may be necessary to hire a captain and crew if youre crossing a large body of water.

If the crew consists of experienced sailors, a smaller yacht may be sufficient as they will be able to handle all of the boats operations.

Its important to consider the number of people on board, experience level, and the amount of space available when selecting the size of yacht for an Atlantic crossing.

Length Of Voyage

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

When deciding what size yacht to choose for an Atlantic crossing, one of the most important factors to consider is the length of the voyage.

A longer voyage will require a larger yacht to provide more space and comfort for the crew and passengers.

On a longer voyage, there may be more people on board, providing a need for additional sleeping and eating areas, as well as more room for recreational activities.

Additionally, a larger yacht will be able to carry more supplies, such as food, fuel, and spare parts, making it more self-sufficient and able to handle any unforeseen events.

It is important to consider the route of the crossing, as some areas may be more prone to rough weather or dangerous conditions, and a larger yacht may be better equipped to handle these conditions.

A larger yacht may also require more fuel, as well as a larger crew, to manage the vessel.

Ultimately, the size of yacht will depend on the purpose of the crossing and the preferences of the crew.

Fuel And Crew Requirements

When deciding on the size of yacht to take for an Atlantic crossing, it’s important to factor in the fuel and crew requirements.

A larger yacht will require more fuel and crew to manage, especially if the voyage is longer.

The crew size and type should also be taken into account when deciding on the size of yacht.

A larger yacht will require more crew to manage the vessel, and the crew should be experienced and knowledgeable in seafaring and navigation.

It may also be necessary to hire extra crew members for certain tasks such as cooking, engineering, and maintenance.

Additionally, the yacht should be equipped with the necessary safety equipment such as life rafts and flares, as well as navigational equipment such as depth sounders and GPS.

All of these factors should be considered when deciding on the size of yacht for an Atlantic crossing.

Route Of Crossing

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

When deciding on the size of yacht for an Atlantic crossing, it is important to consider the route of the crossing.

For example, a longer voyage from the United States to Europe will require a larger yacht than a shorter one from the Caribbean to the United States.

A larger yacht will provide more space and comfort, as well as more fuel and crew to manage.

Additionally, the route of the crossing should be considered for emergency services that may be available along the way.

For example, if the voyage will be close to land, there may be medical facilities and emergency services that could be reached in the event of an emergency.

However, if the voyage will be far away from land, it is important to consider the type of emergency services that would be available if needed.

Weather Conditions

When deciding what size yacht to choose for an Atlantic crossing, it is essential to consider the weather conditions that may be encountered during the voyage.

A larger yacht is more likely to be able to handle a variety of weather conditions, such as high winds, heavy rain and strong waves.

The size of the yacht should also be considered when it comes to the type of weather expected.

A larger yacht is more suitable for long-distance voyages, as it is more capable of handling the prolonged and potentially extreme weather conditions.

It is important to note, however, that larger yachts may require additional fuel and crew to manage in order to safely navigate the seas.

When preparing for an Atlantic crossing, it is important to research the expected weather conditions for the route.

Knowing the weather conditions that may be expected on the route can help to determine the size of the yacht that is suitable for the voyage.

For example, if the route is expected to experience strong winds, it is best to choose a larger yacht that is capable of handling the windy conditions.

Additionally, if the route passes through areas with higher than average waves, a larger yacht is much more suitable for the voyage.

It is also important to consider the type of emergency services available along the route.

In the event of an emergency, such as a medical emergency or a vessel in distress, a larger yacht is more likely to be able to access the necessary help.

Additionally, a larger yacht will be able to carry more supplies, such as food, water, and other equipment, which can be essential in an emergency situation.

Overall, the size of the yacht for an Atlantic crossing should be based on the number of people on board, the size and type of the crew, the length of the voyage, the route of the crossing, the type of weather that is expected, and the type of emergency services available along the way.

With the right amount of research and planning, the perfect size yacht can be chosen for a successful and safe Atlantic crossing.

Emergency Services Available

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

When planning a transatlantic crossing, it is important to consider the type of emergency services available along the route.

On a smaller vessel, you may not be able to access all of the necessary services, so it is important to choose a vessel with enough room to accommodate the necessary crew and equipment, as well as enough fuel to reach the destination in the event of an emergency.

When considering the size of the yacht, the type of emergency services available should be carefully assessed.

For example, if you are crossing during hurricane season, it is important to choose a vessel that can withstand the high winds and potentially heavy waves.

If you are crossing in an area where search and rescue services are available, it is important to have a vessel large enough to be spotted quickly.

It is also important to consider the type of emergency services available at ports of call along the route.

If you are traveling to a remote area, it is important to have a vessel with enough room to accommodate the necessary crew and equipment to make port in the event of an emergency.

If you are traveling to a port with a significant presence of medical and emergency personnel, it is important to have a vessel large enough to accommodate the necessary personnel.

Overall, the size of the yacht for a transatlantic crossing should be based on the purpose of the voyage, the number of people on board, the size and type of crew, the length of the voyage, the route of the crossing, the type of weather that is expected, and the type of emergency services available along the way.

By taking all of these factors into consideration, you can ensure that you have the best possible vessel for your crossing.

Final Thoughts

Choosing the size of yacht for an Atlantic crossing is an important decision that requires careful planning.

The size of the yacht should be determined by the number of people on board, the size and type of the crew, the length of the voyage, the route of the crossing, the weather conditions, and the availability of emergency services.

Ultimately, the size of the yacht should be based on the purpose of the crossing and the preferences of the crew.

With the right information and careful consideration, you can make an informed decision on the right size yacht to choose for your Atlantic crossing.

James Frami

At the age of 15, he and four other friends from his neighborhood constructed their first boat. He has been sailing for almost 30 years and has a wealth of knowledge that he wants to share with others.

Recent Posts

When Was Banana Boat Song Released? (HISTORICAL INSIGHTS)

The "Banana Boat Song" was released in 1956 by Harry Belafonte. This calypso-style song, also known as "Day-O," became a huge hit and remains popular to this day for its catchy tune and upbeat...

How to Make Banana Boat Smoothie King? (DELICIOUS RECIPE REVEALED)

To make a Banana Boat Smoothie King smoothie at home, start by gathering the ingredients: a ripe banana, peanut butter, chocolate protein powder, almond milk, and ice. Blend the banana, a scoop of...

Luxury Viewer

Can Superyachts Cross The Atlantic?

Joshua Palmer

Superyachts are some of the most formidable private vessels on the ocean, but are they capable of crossing the Atlantic Ocean?

Superyachts can definitely cross the Atlantic – some with absolute ease. There are routes from the United States to Europe that stretch for just over three thousand miles, a distance which some superyachts can swallow up in no time. They’re also big enough to handle any adverse Atlantic weather.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Read on to learn more about superyachts and their dominance over the world’s oceans.

Set Sail On The Sea In Your Superyacht

If you’ve got tens of millions of dollars laying around doing absolutely nothing, why not invest in a superyacht? They’re perfect for exploring the world, especially if you want to do so in what is essentially a floating mansion. 

There are few things more lavish or extravagant than a superyacht. They’re regularly seen in the world’s most luxurious resorts and harbors around the world and are almost exclusively reserved for society’s elite.

At the highest end of the spectrum, superyachts come in sizes that rival some small hotels and boast price tags of hundreds of millions of dollars. They come equipped with state of the art technology, and they’re often made with the finest materials and sumptuous fittings. 

If you don’t want to buy one, you can lease them from numerous brokers that specialize in yacht rental. However, going down that route will still cost you around a quarter of a million dollars a week – at least.

Ultimately, superyachts are intensely unique, with each one differing dramatically from the next. They’re designed and built on a case-by-case basis, a process that often features architects, interior designers, and engineers. 

This is why some superyachts become incredibly prolific, with ‘fans’ actively trying to spot them when they’re out around the world’s oceans. For example, yacht hunting is a common activity in places like Monaco, Sardinia, Portofino, Saint-Tropez, and Abu Dhabi.

There’s little restriction surrounding the piloting of these superyachts, and they’re more or less open to travel wherever they so desire. Of course, this means they’ll sometimes have to contend with some of the world’s biggest oceans. 

In this article, we’re going to discuss superyachts crossing the Atlantic Ocean. However, if you’d like to find out whether superyachts can cross the gargantuan Pacific Ocean, you can do so here .

Advance Across The Atlantic

While the Atlantic Ocean might seem like a daunting thing to cross, it’s actually an extremely common thing to do. Every day, hundreds of vessels make the crossing, including cargo ships, passenger liners, and military vessels. 

This traffic also includes numerous superyachts, ferrying wealthy passengers and owners from Europe to the United States. Alternatively, they could be traveling from the Caribbean to Africa, or Canada to the United Kingdom. 

It’s ultimately up to the owner where the superyacht travels, and as long as they have enough fuel in the tank, the Atlantic doesn’t pose much of an obstacle. It is a long crossing, true, but they’ll be doing it in some of the most luxurious circumstances possible. 

It can take anything from ten days to three weeks to successfully navigate the Atlantic Ocean. If the conditions are fair and the ship’s course doesn’t have to be altered too much, the journey will be much faster. 

There are some superyachts that can make the crossing on a single tank of fuel, without breaking a sweat. At the higher end of the spectrum, this includes the Azzam , one of the largest yachts in the world with a value of almost half a billion dollars.

Azzam is powered by enormous and economical engines that produce a cruising speed of around eighteen knots. It’s such a huge superyacht that one hundred people can comfortably live aboard, all at the same time. 

Quite simply, it’s one of the most luxurious and opulent vessels in the world, with a drastic amount of amenities and technology. Before Azzam was launched in 2013, more than four thousand people were involved in her construction. 

This is just one of a few superyachts that can cross the Atlantic with ease. In fact, there’s a whole category of superyacht built to travel extremely long distances. 

They’re known as ‘explorer’ yachts, and they’re specially designed to travel in the more adverse conditions, and across the widest oceans. The best example is the Octopus , a 126-meter superyacht with a value of three hundred million dollars.

If you’re going to cross any super-wide ocean paths, there are few better ways to do it than in one of these vessels. 

  • Privacy Policy

© 2021 Black Sands Media - All Rights Reserved

  • Food & Drink
  • Leisure & Recreation
  • Art & Collectibles

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

  • OUR TRAWLER YACHTS
  • – KROGEN 44 AE
  • – KROGEN 48 AE
  • – KROGEN 50 Open
  • – KROGEN 52
  • – KROGEN 58 EB
  • – KROGEN 60 OPEN
  • – KROGEN 70
  • OUR PERFORMANCE YACHTS
  • – SUMMIT MOTORYACHTS
  • PRE-OWNED YACHTS
  • Full Displacement Trawler Explained
  • Kadey-Krogen Hull Design
  • Bluewater Cruising
  • Engines and Systems
  • Construction
  • Living On Our Trawlers
  • Accommodations
  • The Kadey-Krogen Team
  • Trawler Living
  • Atlantic Crossings
  • Inside Passage
  • Owner Groups and Blogs
  • Latest News and Updates
  • Waypoints Magazine

Crossing the Atlantic on a Yacht in Comfort

Experienced cruisers often discover Kadey-Krogen Yachts because they begin to search for yachts capable of crossing the Atlantic. If one searches the listings for Transatlantic boats for sale or contacts a broker with a very specific request to hear about yachts that can cross the Atlantic, they’re bound to discover plenty of superyachts, and some custom trawlers, and, of course, a selection of our models that are built to take on long bluewater cruising legs such as one takes on for an ocean crossinig.

Those who are more serious about open-ocean crossings begin to think about the best time to cross the Atlantic west to east and also consider provisioning, crew, a timetable, potential destinations, and all the factors, large and small, that enter into this exciting equation.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Lessons Learned in more than two years of cruising in Northern Europe

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Journey from Rhode Island to Ireland Via the Azores

  • Yachts for Sale
  • Sales Report 2024
  • FAQ – Luxury Crewed Yacht Charters
  • FAQ – Bareboat charters
  • FAQ – Sell your Boat
  • FAQ – Buying a Yacht
  • How Much does it Cost to Charter a Luxury Yacht?
  • All Blog Posts and News
  • Yachting for beginners
  • Indian Ocean
  • Mediterranean
  • Sales & New build
  • Motor Yacht
  • Event & News

Windward Islands Yachting Company

Best Yachts for Transatlantic Crossing: Our Selection and Advice for 2023

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Sailing across the Atlantic is more than just an item on a bucket list for sailors. It’s how you get your boat to new horizons, whether to cruise the Caribbean islands or explore the waters around Europe. It’s a big undertaking and requires serious planning and a solid sailing vessel. You can cross the Atlantic by yourself, with a rally of like-minded racers and cruisers, or as part of a highly competitive race. But no matter how you go, the choice of a good sailing yacht lies at the foundation of a safe and enjoyable crossing.

What does a boat need for a transatlantic crossing?

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

If you choose to do your transatlantic crossing with a rally or race, you’ll have to meet a stringent list of required equipment and safety checks. That’s easier because you have the lists right in front of you, and a team of inspectors to check your work. Preparing for a crossing with just one boat, the captain has to take all the responsibility and know what to check.

Sailing across the Atlantic is a serious undertaking, and you will sail out of range of shore-based rescue and into rapidly changing and possibly severe weather systems. You will have several thousand miles of nonstop sailing and may be at sea for several weeks.

What you must have

Any boat sailing across the Atlantic needs solid construction and a sound rig, a reliable auxiliary engine, and enough stores for food and water for the crew. That’s a bare minimum. Every boat needs to be checked from stem to stern to make sure systems are reliable, many older boats can certainly make this trip, and not every new boat is suitable.

Some tiny boats have crossed the Atlantic, so minimum size isn’t a requirement. What successful boats have in common is a solid hull and rig, with reliable sails and systems.

Most transatlantic yachts have a lot more

You can cross the oceans with a lightly equipped boat with few conveniences or extra safety gear, but most do not. A few things to look for on your boat include:

  • An EPIRB satellite rescue beacon .
  • Long range communication devices, such as satellite phones and single sideband radios.
  • Certified life raft with space for all crew on board.
  • Storm sails
  • Storm safety gear such as drogues or sea anchors.
  • Access to up-to-date weather forecasts and reports.

Do not head offshore without these

The list of required equipment for races and rallies is exhaustive, and many of the requirements are exacting and expensive. No one is enforcing compliance when you sail on your own. But there are a few things you should not head offshore without.

  • A reliable auxiliary engine. If the wind dies and you need to dodge bad weather, this can be a lifesaver.
  • Access to good, current weather information.
  • Reliable sails. Have all sails inspected by a sailmaker for wear and damage before setting out.
  • A life raft. If you run into serious problems and lose your boat, this is your last hope for rescue.
  • Spare parts and tools for common repairs.

Read also: 10 Sailing Myths And Bad Advice You Shouldn’t Listen To

What experience do you need to do a transatlantic?

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

A transatlantic crossing is a major sailing milestone for experienced sailors. The north Atlantic is no place for new sailors and beginners, unless they’re with competent and experienced crew or a qualified captain.

If you’re thinking of a transatlantic crossing on your own, you’ll need experience with multi-day, nonstop passages. Sailing offshore is twenty-four hours a day and nonstop, there’s no place to park. Experience with night sailing, standing watches, navigation, provisioning, and basic engine and system troubleshooting are all a must.

Read also: Five Easy Beginners-Friendly Sailing Trips And Destinations

Chartering a yacht – a great option for less experienced sailors.

Charter fleets make seasonal moves from Europe to the Caribbean are an excellent way to get offshore sailing experience. Charter companies provide a captain and first mate, but you can reserve a spot and fill the roles of a full crew member, standing watch and sailing far offshore.

Many boats are also available for charter in cruising rallies, races, and deliveries. You’ll need to hire a captain with the needed offshore experience, but you may come away with enough experience to skipper your own yacht the next time.

The best yachts for a transatlantic crossing

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

There are many yachts which are suitable for a transatlantic passage. Some will be less expensive, some will be more comfortable, faster, or better suited to you, your experience, and your budget.

NEEL 51: Fast and easy to sail trimaran

The NEEL 51 is a fast, comfortable trimaran suited to a smaller crew. It’s spacious, but easy to handle while putting up double digit speeds and 200+ mile days. Trimarans can be a little more sea-kindly in waves and chop than catamarans, and don’t heel hard like monohulls. A protected helm station gives great protection offshore and good visibility, and there space on board for plenty of crew and guests.

The racing version of the NEEL 51 is built with lighter materials, and features a larger rig to project more sail area for more speed, while still affording the same luxury and comfort at anchor.

More info about our Neel 51 available for charter

Outremer 5X: High-speed catamaran sailing

The Outremer 5X offers top tier performance and comfort in a single passage. Sustaining double digit speeds with east, the Outremer 5X is one of the fastest cruising catamarans on the market. Outremer is known for both performance and quality, and your transatlantic trip will be fast and safe.

With four different helm stations, she’s a sailing boat foremost. It’s designed for a small crew, even when tearing up the ocean on a fast passage. With options for three or four cabins and a cockpit that can fit a dozen people, she’ll be as comfortable when you arrive as she is fast on passage.

Hallberg-Rassy 57: Sturdy monohull with elegance and speed

Hallberg-Rassy builds tough cruising yachts, and the 57 is no exception. While monohulls don’t put up the blistering speeds you’ll find in multihulls, the Hallberg-Rassy 57 is no slouch and can log 200 mile days. Most offshore sailing and cruising is done in monohulls, and blue water sailors love their stability and seakindliness across all conditions.

The Hallberg-Rassy 57 has generous accommodations, and loads of capacity for gear supplies. The deck layout is clear, and lines and controls are laid out for easy use with a small crew. With a performance design by German Frers, the 57 sails well on all points of sail.

There are many choices for the best boat for you for a transatlantic crossing. No matter which boat you choose for your transatlantic and how you go – on your own, or on a charter – preparation is key. Your boat needs to be equipped with a full range of safety gear, and checked from top to bottom so you know your sails, hull, and engines will get you where you’re going.

Read also: The Caribbean To Mediterranean Sailing Routes: How To Cross The Atlantic Eastward

RELATED ARTICLES MORE FROM AUTHOR

How fast can a yacht go, 8 gulets, ketches and schooners to consider for a timeless sail , luxury crewed yacht charters – frequently asked questions.

  • Testimonials
  • Privacy Policy

Call Us: +44 121 285 8010

Transatlantic crossing with a supercat 70ft Sunreef catamaran this November!

Published by Eldin Basic on July 13 th , 2022

Keen on the ultimate yachting adventure and once in a lifetime experience? We are pleased to recommend a NEW 2022 model fo  SUNREEF 70 ready for the transatlantic crossing.  With a top captain, full gear and all inclusive service, you can cross the  Atlantic in luxury …

SUNREEF 70 transatlantic charter

Only a few years ago, crossing the Atlantic was an adventure for only a few hardcore sailors.  To do so, you would have to have thousands of miles of skippering or crewing experience and choice of boats was usually limited to monohulls from 40-50ft and a couple of top racing boats up to 80ft.  Moving forward, a huge number of multihulls was introduced in 00’s and in particular during 2010’s, when fleets turned the corner and introduced higher number of catamarans into their Caribbean ports for the first time in history.   This brought higher number of both experienced and those with limited experience sailors on board, all keen to experience ARC and ARC+ racing for the first or second time.

LUXURY TRANSATLANTIC CHARTER

Some of them and others are now coming back keen to experience the crossing of the Atlantic on a luxury boat however.  Gone are the days when some were happy and ready to literally ‘’risk their lives’’ doing the night watch or sailing with inexperienced captains and crew members.  As a result, we are now offering transatlantic crossings not only on smaller bareboat catamarans, bigger skippered ones or those with crew, but the as an ultimate luxury crewed charter or superyacht charter adventure.  With fully inclusive service, top of the range yachts including monohulls from 60-125ft and catamarans from 60-145ft, you can cross the pond being served by top crew, enjoy sunbathing or book reading on deck and relax in the knowledge that fine dining and carefully chosen wines will be on board and served when required.  One of those yachts is this superbly equipped top of the range Sunreef Yachts 70ft sailing catamaran.  Book her now from 100,000 – 125,000 Eur for a 5 week adventure crossing the Atlantic from Gran Canaria to Martinique. You could also extend the experience and request a one week stopover in Cape Verde or start in the Mediterranean 2-3 weeks before.  For final pricing and a list of what’s included, do get in touch in order to receive a full quote.

Highlights of NEW Sunreef 70 (2022):

-        Owner version with 1 master suite and 3 VIP guest staterooms -        Superb 1 million Eur extra equipment on board -        NEW but experienced crew on board -        Flexible itineraries in both East and West Med -        Christmas and NEW YEAR 2022/23 bookings possible in the Caribbean -        Charter rates from only 50,000 Eur/week plus any VAT and APA -        MYBA terms apply in most cases -        Long-term charters and Transatlantic Crossing deals available

  Photos courtesy of  Sunreef Yachts – Originals available in 2022

SUNREEF 70

Nothing less than spectacular you can expect when choosing which water toys to use.  This amazing supersail catamaran will have all the latest gear on board and biggest and most luxurious superyacht tender on board that can be safely carried on the swim platform.  You will in fact find even SeaBobs on board and on top of the usual suspects such as 2x SUP, an inflatable sea kayak, water skis, knee board, donut and snorkelling gear. Aermarine 420 jet tender with 40hp outboard will also take you safely to the shore when required. You can therefore enjoy both extensive exploration of the coastline with various water toys or luxury transfers in your best attire when required as apart from fine food served on board, you can also sample a few chosen restaurant offering along the sailing itinerary both on mainland Italy around Amalfi coast as well as on request in Sicily, Sardinia or even Corsica.

TRANSATLANTIC CROSSING

Your luxury cruise in the Mediterranean, or in particular within the Cote d’Azur or Greek Islands can therefore start this week already, with flexible payment options, including us accepting a range of cryptocoins such as BITCOIN or Ethereum, or standard old credit cards from VISA/MASTER to AMEX.  Whatever your choice of payment or sailing week, you can rest assured that your private yacht charter with SuperSailYachts.com will be a success. Apart from the usual luxury yacht charters, should you wish to become an owner of a yacht, it’s worth knowing that we can also arrange commissioning of a new Benetti , Sunseeker, Azimut, Pershing or San Lorenzo motor yachts, thus if you are keen to buy a new or 2nd hand superyacht, please do contact us to forward specifications, arrange viewings and commission surveys.  As exclusive dealers for PUCCINI YACHTS and UK broker for VAAN, Aquila and Sunreef Catamarans we do specialise in bespoke orders of new motor yachts as well as sailing catamarans, power catamarans and traditional Turkish gullets which range from 23,9 – 50m and start in price from 880,000 Eur with 12 months delivery.  NEW Eco models with HYBRID engines or even solar powered boats are available. #supersailyachts WhatsApp (00447792052007)

In case you are interested in chartering one of these or similar yachts or wish to consider purchasing one of the models which are offered for sale, do let us know by filling out the CHARTER REQUEST FORM  or send us an email to [email protected]  now.  

Disclaimer:  The information provided here are made as a general guide only, made to give a broad description and latest news of the shown yacht or yachts. They are not intended to constitute part of an offer or contract.  The details of the luxury yacht or yachts displayed on this page are made merely for informational purposes, and the yacht or the yachts are not necessarily available for yacht charter or for sale, nor is she or they represented or marketed in anyway by SuperSailYachts.com. All details, including any photographs, measurements, plans and specifications mentioned, are given as a guide only and should not be relied upon for the purchase or charter of this yacht. The copyright of all details, photographs and deckplans remains the property of their rightful owners or their chosen representatives.

This news refers to:

SUNREEF 70

Italian lifestyle at its best with Southern Wind 82 supersailyacht!

LUXURY SAILING YACHT AMMONITE

Looking to charter best Lagoon Seventy 7 there is? Look no further!

LUXURY LAGOON 77 CATAMARAN

Superyacht charter on BENETTI VISION 145 with 20% discount in Greece!

BENETTI VISION 145 - GRANDE AMORE

NEW Lagoon 65 catamaran charters in the Balearic islands!

LAGOON SIXTY 5

An Italian designed superyacht cruises the Turkish Mediterranean!

FERRETTI 850

Ms Couradon chartered a 75' luxury sailing yacht in South of France. The boat was delivered to Nice for an easy embarkation close to the airport and without any extra fees. The charter went perfectly and the party found sailing to be a refreshing experience given the family owns a 60' motor yacht.

  • Yacht Charter
  • Destinations
  • Giga yachts
  • Super yachts
  • Mega yachts
  • Sailing yachts
  • Power boats
  • testimonials-17"> Testimonials
  • Useful links
  • Privacy Policy
  • Legal Notices & Terms

logo

Thank you, Your request has been sent!

close

Please fill up the form:

Contact Name/s:
E-mail Address:
Phone No's:
Evening Phone No's:
Home address:
Company Name:
Company Address:
Your Budget:
Embarkation Date:
Length of charter:
Special Requests:

Charter Requests Form

Personal Info:

Contact Name/s:
E-mail Address:
Day Phone No's:
Evening Phone No's:
Mobile Phone No's:
Home Address:
Company Name:
Company Address:

Please specify your request:

Yacht Type:
Your Daily Budget:
Charter Destination:
Number of Adults:
Number of Children:
Number of Double Cabins:
Number of Sinlge Cabins:
Embarkation Date:
Length of Charter:
Special Requirements:

Oceanpreneur

What kind of boats cross the Atlantic Ocean? 7 Options explained

You’re looking for a way to go across the Atlantic without flying. What options are out there? Here are 7 options explained. I’ve tried five of them.

Sail across the Atlantic on a small vessel

Sailing an ocean on a Small sailing vessel

Many privately-owned sailing vessels cross the Atlantic, to spend a sunny sailing season either in the Mediterranean or Caribbean or as part of their around the world voyage. It is a big thing for them and attracts all sorts of seamen and women: young ‘pirate’ dudes who have escaped the rat race, adventure couples, retirees, families, groups of friends, and single older sailors.

The largest share of the captains is between 50 – 65 years old. It’s the group that has the time and money resources to sail. All sorts of nationalities make the crossing, with the French and Swedish seeming to dominate the fleet.

By crewing on a small sailing yacht, you’ll be involved with every aspect of seamanship and sailing. You will learn a lot for sure. Many boats choose to stop in Cape Verde or the Azores, and often don’t have tight schedules.

Sailing across the antlantic ocean

Boats come in all sorts of shapes and materials. Hulls are made from steel, wood, aluminium, and today mostly of fibreglass. 90% of the boats crossing the ocean is bigger than 36ft, with most of them measuring around 44ft. (14m).

A smaller yacht could also be perfectly ocean-worthy. I’ve seen boats of 26 ft. crossing the pond. Some adventure people row across the Atlantic. In 2017 someone even Stand Up Paddled (SUP) across the Atlantic. Being on any boat is a luxury compared to that.

Six people (out of 100) I interviewed in my book crossed the Atlantic on a boat smaller than 36ft. and all of them would like to do it again. This year we also have Nadiem, Ocean Nomads member who’ll sail across in his little sailboat.

Both monohulls and catamarans cross the Atlantic. Catamarans are generally faster, more spacious, and rock less. On the flip side: they can flip!  If  they do, it’s a major challenge to come up again. Don’t worry, this is extremely unlikely. Having seen hundreds of boats planning, preparing and making the crossing, I estimate that roughly 70% of the boats that cross are monohulls.

With Ocean Nomads we sometimes have small liveaboard sailing vessels looking for crew in the network to sail across, or members recommend a vessel from their networks.

Sail across the Atlantic on Superyacht

Many larger yachts cross the Atlantic as a ‘delivery’, where a boat needs to be taken from point A to B. Boats have to be moved across the ocean for a new charter season, for the private owner who will hop on board again on the other side, or because someone bought it on the other continent.

Usually, paid and professional crew do these types of deliveries. As an amateur crew member, you can be a cheap extra set of hands.

A yacht is a ‘superyacht’ when it is over 24 metres (79ft.). These are  big yachts. They often have generators running every day to keep fridges and freezers going. They load up thousands of litres of fuel and water, and are less dependent on the wind.

As such, there is less risk and generally more comfort. These trips often run on a tight schedule, so there won’t be much flexibility for stops along the way (like in Cape Verde or the Azores). In most cases, there will also be more people on board (five-eight people compared to three-five on smaller vessels).

Crossing on a big boat like this is faster, less adventurous, and more comfortable. The crew are often younger, and some live and work permanently on the boat. Many of them have crossed the Atlantic Ocean numerous times and are therefore less excited about it than the average ‘yachtie’.

Timelines are tight and there’s often not time for island exploration. Usually, you are expected to work hard. Also, it’s not unusual that superyachts don’t even use the sails to prevent damaging, and have the sails tip /top for when the owner comes on board.

A Transatlantic on a Charter yacht

If you would rather not have the pre-crossing adventure or spend too much time searching for a boat, and/or if money is not an issue, you can book a charter ocean passage. Charter trips are organised on all sorts of boats: small, big, monohulls, catamaran, and racing boats.

Numerous racing yachts cross the ocean reaching boat speeds up to 35 knots! In addition to professional crew, spots are sold and you can sign up for a wet and speedy adventure guaranteed.

A charter trip costs between €2,000 and €10,000. An organized trip like this could be advantageous if you’re on a tight schedule. It’s more likely to leave on the planned date.

At the same time, the time schedule could be a disadvantage. What if the weather window is not ideal to leave? In many cases, though not always, everything is taken care of such as provisioning and cooking, so you wouldn’t have to figure out much yourself.

Charter organisations need to comply with a lot of safety requirements and check ups to legally carry out the voyage. This assures some safety but still you need to do your homework if it’s a safe ride.

Another consideration of booking this type of passage is that you won’t know your shipmates. When you search the adventurous way, you have the opportunity to meet the other sailors before you commit to joining the crew. On a chartered passage you’re stuck with whoever else has booked the trip, even if you don’t like them.

With Ocean Nomads we work together with SV Twister and have the following Atlantic Crossing planned .

Sailing the Atlantic on a Tall ship

Every year numerous tall ships sail across the Atlantic, like the Stad Amsterdam or Oosterschelde, and this year also SV Twister :) .  Sailing across on a large traditional boat is spectacular. Many young people work on the tall ships. You could either try that or buy yourself a passage.

I wrote the above in my book, a friend of SV Twister reached out to me. Long story short, last  year 2022/2023 I, with Ocean Nomads, organizing a trip across the Atlantic, Caribbean sea, and back across the Atlantic , and I now experience this way of sailing across also. You can join this trip in 2025 .

Sailing the Atlantic on a Tall ship

Update! We’re back from the Atlantic. And we made a film about it:) Here is a the film about Sailing the Atlantic with Ocean Nomads. My 5th Atlantic crossing.

Travel the Ocean with a Sail Boat Ferry

There are no sailing ferries (yet), although boats are being built for this purpose. At the time of writing, Voyagevert is conducting feasibility studies to construct the fastest and largest sailing catamaran for a ferry service as a sustainable alternative to flight for transatlantic travel. Also Fair ferry is looking into it.

A transatlantic on a cruise ships

Another kind of ferry are the cruise ships. More and more cruise ships cross the Atlantic to do the season on the other side. They need relocation and spots on board are sold as ‘repositioning cruises.’ It’s often cheaper than airfare and your house rent combined. One option that is cool, is ‘ Nomadcruise ,’ an Atlantic crossing for entrepreneurs and digital nomads.

These floating cities are not an environmentally friendly way to cross. It takes around eight days and a lot of noise to cross with a cruise ship. Data on emissions is remarkably difficult to find. Some sources state that an average cruise ship at sea emits more, and less filtered, smoke than one million cars combined each day.

In a one week trip, a large cruise ship generates ten backyard swimming pools of blackwater (raw sewage), and 40 more swimming pools of greywater (water from sinks, baths, showers, laundry and galleys). They also generate large volumes of oily bilge water, sewage sludge, garbage and noise.

Sail Across the Atlantic on a Cargo ship

More cargo ships cross the Atlantic than sailboats. This is a non-sailing ship option that can take you across. Cargo ships usually rent out a few cabins to passengers. This costs a few thousand euros. Travelling with a cargo vessel can be a good alternative if you want to cross the ocean, don’t like sailing, and do not want to fly. Prepare to be surrounded by engine noise. Crossing on a cargo would take one to two weeks. Depending on the weather, cargo and size, cargo vessels run between 15-25 knots . 

There are also  sailing  cargo Atlantic crossing possibilities out there. ‘ Tres Hombres ‘ is a 32 metres Schooner transporting traditional goods like rum and chocolate between the Caribbean and Europe. Timbercoast is a 1920 built 43.5m Schooner that transports goods like coffee and gin. Both ships welcome crew on board helping out with this sustainable way of transporting goods.

My ocean sailing preference

“What kind of boat are you joining?” This was the first question most people asked me when I told them I was going to cross the Atlantic Ocean by sail. At the time, I knew nothing about boats, and thought “Does it matter? I just want to make the passage!” Having sailed across on five completely different boats across the Atlantic, I know now that the type of boat determines large part of the experience.Not just because of the boat, but because of the tasks and people involved with that type of boat.

My preference is to crew on a smaller monohull sailboat of 40-44ft – basic but adventurous and on these boats, I’ve met the coolest captains. Monohulls are more fun to sail. It’s easier to ‘feel’ the boat as opposed to a catamaran. It’s kind of like a scooter versus a quadbike.

Smaller boats generally allow for more exploring and socialising time around the harbour- since there’s usually less work to be done. This is the adventurous way of travelling by sailboat where you go with the weather and with others as excited about the adventure as you. I sailed as crew on these kind of sailboat for years ( Here is a video summary of my story ).

At the end, it’s the people who make the trip! In my survey amongst 100 Atlantic ocean Crew & Captains who have done it, almost everyone answered to the question: “what would you do different, if you’d go again?” “I’d take more time to find the right vessel, with like minded and value sharing people.

Finding a boat is the easy part, finding the right and safe vessel aligned with your vibes and values, is the main challenge. With Ocean Nomads we now created a toolkit to help you dip your toes into the ocean nomads lifestyle , happy, safe, and meaningful.

How to find a sail boat ride across the Atlantic?

Here’s what I, and ocean nomads, have created for you to help you get out there, happy, safe, and meaningful.

It’s that time of the year again where many head south and west to follow the sun, catch the tradewinds, and realize ocean dreams.

Travelling an ocean on someone else’s sailing boat, or taking a stranger on board is not a straightforward endeavour. To be ready to expect the unexpected, careful investigation and preparation is essential. Four Ocean Crossings and 30.000 Miles of boat hitchhiking on dozens of vessels, as well as organizing crew for +10 different trips now, I figured out a few things, and keep learning:).

Here are the latest waypoints to help you on an ocean adventure, fun & impact:

📝

  • We’ve created resources and mini-courses on Sailing across the Atlantic, Offshore crew packing lists, Ocean crew preparing tips. Provisioning with minimum waste, Veggie recipes, Zero waste nomad life, and ocean education information. But the real value is the network you can tap into, find answers, connections, and support to make the ocean adventure dreams real.

🌠

  • Because of that we can create way real value and attract real dedicated members only who are serious about making dreams real. 

NEW in 2024! The Sailboat Travel Crew Prep course.

All my sailing lifestyle crew tips condensed into one pack. 

Collage of various travel-related images and documents spread out around a central computer screen, displaying a video on travel with a young woman smiling.

Ps. If any of the above has helped you, I’d love to hear so! Make a comment, leave a review on @oceanpreneur or @oceannomads.community, fill out the big Atlantic Ocean Crew survey

On which boat have you crossed or would you be most exciting to cross the Atlantic?

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Hi! My name is Suzanne. I'm here to help you go on ocean adventures and make positive impact for a healthier ocean. Explore this website to learn what I do and how you can make some splashes too!

Adventure Videos

Suus | Slow Travel Lifestyles with Nature ⛵️🚐🏕️& 🐕

oceanpreneur

🧜‍♀️Ocean & Eco 💙 Explorer Tips & Tales 🗺️+15yr Fulltime Adventurer by Sail & Van 🧭Travel Oceans @howtotravelbysailboat ⛵️Tribe @oceannomads.community

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Previous Post Tips on Foraging for Food. Journey to Self Sufficient Nomadlife

Next post why sail the ocean 12 reasons to jump on board an atlantic sailing adventure, you may also like.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

2023 nomad life highlights and 2024 adventures

A woman holding a green leaf in front of a dog.

The best appropriate boat is about 30 to 40 feet long. In case you using a smaller boat, there is a possibility that it may not withstand harsh weather conditions and ocean currents.

' src=

thank you so much for this cool article.

Leave a Reply Cancel Reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

 subscribe to our newsletter

Sail With Me

ocean nomads adventure impact community logo.

© 2024 Oceanpreneur. Suzanne van der Veeken. Registration: KVK 60416947 VAT: NL001950161B95

  • Canary Islands
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Sail with me
  • Crewing Tips
  • Sail across the Atlantic Tips
  • Sailing & Sustainability
  • Sailing Opportunities
  • Ocean Nomads Community
  • THRU-HIKING
  • Slow Travel
  • Natural Living
  • Ethical Travel
  • Zero Waste & DIY
  • Conscious Gift Guide
  • What can you do?
  • Ocean Education
  • Tips on Selfpublishing a Book
  • What I read / listen
  • Work with me
  • Partners & Press

Preparing to cross the Atlantic

OY565 190617 BCR 149

We always encourage the Oyster Family to explore and achieve new sailing experiences. And completing an Atlantic crossing is the dream of many a sailor. But the sea can be a formidable mistress so it pays to prepare well, making sure everything is ship shape before a longer ocean passage, right down to the last sail tie. Oyster Crew member Leandra Sewell details how she and her crewmates prepare for an Atlantic crossing aboard their Oyster Yacht.

PROVISIONING

I don’t need to explain why taking the right foods for a longer sailing trip is so important, but here is a quick guide to the provisions we take:

- The number one rule is to take foods that will keep for a long time. Dry store goods – tinned foods, pasta sauce, cup-a-soups, crackers, tea, coffee, cereals, bread flour, long-life milk and water; not forgetting easy to grab snacks such as nuts, dried fruit, cereal bars, chocolates, biscuits, crisps. Baking ingredients let you cook on the move, and who doesn’t love finishing a night watch to the smell of freshly baked bread?

- Fresh fruit and vegetables that keep well and can be kept out the fridge for a long period are important. Apples, oranges, pears, grapefruit, unripened avocados, unripened bananas, pineapple, mango, watermelon, carrots, corn, potatoes, onions, pumpkin, celery and peppers all fall into this list. When planning meals, it’s important to work around when this produce will start to go off so nothing is wasted.

- Frozen foods are great too, so fresh produce is available throughout the passage. We take frozen vegetables, frozen berries and other fruit that can be thrown in a smoothie. Meat and ready-made pizzas are good and bread can also be frozen and toasted easily.

- Don’t forget – anti-seasickness provisions like ginger biscuits, ginger and peppermint teas, and mints are essential, although hopefully not necessary!

FOOD PREPARATION

Our chef will prepare three meals a day for seven people for +/- 16 days, which is the average time it takes us to sail across the Atlantic. Below are some handy hints from how our chef does this: 

- Fruit and vegetables are cut up, portioned and frozen for future use.

- Some dishes are made in advance and frozen – these include lasagne, pies, stews, curries, chilli and soups.

- Wrap fresh herbs and leaves in damp paper towels to make them last longer.

- Home-made dips like hummus are preprepared and we continue to prepare foods like this as we sail.

SAFETY DRILLS

It is important everyone knows their responsibilities in case of an emergency. So we run through all our safety checks and drills to pick up anything that might be amiss before we leave.

- Life jackets must be checked for wear and tear.

- Locations of safety equipment are identified and we remove all the covers and run through how everything works. 

- We test the alarms and emergency exits.

- We do a full run through of fire, man overboard and abandon ship drills.

MECHANICAL CHECKS

- We test all the alarms including fire and bilge alarms.

- Start up the generators and engine to make sure they run smoothly.

- Winches and hydraulics are all tested.

- Service intervals on machinery are checked.

- The bow and stern thrusters are tested to ensure a smooth take off once we slip the lines.

DECK CHECKS

Not only do we have the fishing rods ready to supplement our diet with fresh and sustainably caught fish, but we also needed to check the following: 

- the jack-stays have been set up and tested to ensure they are tight.

- winches have been set up with the correct lines.

-  the stainless steel is polished to protect it from the salt water and do a final wash down.

- all hatches are stowed and locked close, ready to go to sea!

Want to get a feel for the Atlantic Crossing experience?

READ THE ATLANTIC CROSSING BLOG >

Oyster Yachts News Preparing To Cross The Atlantic Sailing Voyage Story Supplies

Sign up to our newsletter

Be the first to hear about new launches, exclusive events and all things Oyster

© 2024 OYSTER YACHTS

Oyster World Rally Mega Nav v2

OYSTER WORLD RALLY

Entries for the Oyster World Rally 2028-29 are now open. Embark on the sailing adventure of a lifetime

Oyster 565 Series II

The new 565 Series II

The pursuit of perfection continues

Oyster Yachts Sailing Charters Luxury Oyster 885 Lush

Oyster Charter

Experience exhilarating sailing, luxury and style on an Oyster charter

New 565 Series II v2

New 565 Series II

Oyster Charter Luxury Sailing Yacht Charters

LUXURY CHARTER

Experience exhilarating sailing, luxury and style on an oyster charter. personal, exclusive and uniquely oyster.

iSNL Mega Nav D 2

Oyster 825 iSNL

Discover this exceptional late model 825 with a unbeatable spec and a bespoke layout..

Untitled design 83

oyster ownership

Personalised care, unforgettable experiences and lifelong yacht support, oyster world rally.

Oyster World Rally Mega Nav 1 v2

ENTRIES OPEN

Embark on the sailing adventure of a lifetime. entries are now open for the oyster world rally 2028-29.

Untitled 9

Follow the Oyster World Rally 2024-25 fleet live

Winner of European Yacht of the Year 2023. She sets a new 50 foot bluewater benchmark, offering a stunning combination of sailing performance, comfort, safety and luxurious living space.

Oyster 495 sailing yacht with man at helm

Heralding a new generation of Oysters, this 60 foot bluewater cruiser is a sailing yacht for all oceans. Practical and well-provisioned for long distance sailing or cruising in coastal waters.

Oyster 565 sailing yacht at sea in med

The much-anticipated Oyster 595 is well-proportioned and extremely versatile. Offering exciting, customised build options with no compromise, she is capable of great things.

Oyster 595 sailing yacht sailing at sea

A versatile sub-70 foot sailboat offering the perfect balance of size and practicality. She can be sailed shorthanded effortlessly or take a full crew and up to eight friends and family.

sailing yacht oyster 675

This long range 75 foot cruising yacht is designed for very big adventures. A joy to sail yourself, she also boasts dedicated crew quarters.

Oyster 745 sailing yacht at sea with mountains 1 v2

Oyster 885SII

An exhilarating 90 foot sailing yacht, delivering comfort and safety with uncompromising performance. She is capable of taking you anywhere in the world effortlessly, in luxury and style.

Oyster 885 sailing yacht with crew

First name *

Last name *

Phone number *

Country/Region *

Attach CV *

Attach covering letter

Current occupation

LinkedIn profile

crossing the atlantic by motor yacht

Crossing The Atlantic By Motor Yacht? Everything You Need To Know

A yacht can travel both the Pacific and Atlantic seas. A sailing boat or a motor yacht may span the Pacific and Atlantic seas. It’s preferable to have a tank large enough to store the amount of fuel you’ll be burning.

Not all yachts, however, are capable of undertaking these journeys. If you intend to sail across any of these seas, be sure you have an ocean-going boat as well as the necessary equipment and abilities.

Some yachts will not have enough fuel to make the journey and will be transported aboard specially constructed freighters.

In this essay, I’ll go over some of the key facts concerning yachts that you should be aware of before embarking on your journey.

How Long Does it Take to Sail Across the Atlantic?

Sailing across the Atlantic takes roughly 3-4 weeks, but if you’re lucky, use shortcuts, and have a speedy sailboat, you can accomplish it in two weeks. It might take up to a month if you don’t get enough wind for a week or longer. It’s critical to know the shortcuts, optimize speed, and have cross-Atlantic sailing expertise.

How Far Can a Yacht Travel?

In an 8-hour day, a powered boat of 35 feet in length can go over 200 miles at a speed of 25 knots. They can cover about 300 miles in a day at 35 knots. You can go thousands of kilometers if you have adequate gasoline or fill-ups.

Can a Yacht Cross the Atlantic Ocean?

A typical powered boat would require a tank with a capacity of roughly 5000 gallons of petrol and a fuel efficiency of 2.5 nautical miles per gallon to traverse the Atlantic.

This is based on a gasoline consumption rate of 4 gallons per hour at a cruising speed of 10 knots. Of course, this is at cruising speed. They can’t keep going at top speed for an extended amount of time (which would burn through the fuel faster).

The voyage (about 3,000 miles) would take 300 hours or 12.5 days at 10 knots.

Every year, sailing boats cross the Atlantic since the only fuel they use is to power generators that power aboard equipment.

When the weather isn’t cooperating, some fuel may be utilized to power the boat.A fast boat traveling at 25 knots takes roughly 4–5 days to cross the Atlantic Ocean. In a sailing yacht, though, it would take longer (which also depends on the winds).

We have a lot more information on which boat types are capable of crossing oceans. If you’re thinking of taking a boat journey across the oceans, this is a must-read.

Read more: Boat Fuel Tank Vent Open or Close (What to do?)

How Large Does A Boat Need To Be In Order To Cross The Atlantic Ocean?

To cross the Atlantic, you’ll need a boat that’s at least 30 feet long, whether you’re sailing or motoring. For safety and comfort, your boat should be at least 40 feet long. Although the experience of sailing or motoring across the Atlantic is vastly different, both require a boat of this size. If you plan on having a crew on board, you may need a boat that is much larger. Why do you need a 30 or 40 foot boat when you can cross the Atlantic with a lot smaller boat? The simple answer is that attempting to cross in anything smaller may be extremely risky and inconvenient. Here are a few reasons why you should get a boat at least this size:

Seaworthiness

You don’t want to be stranded in a tiny boat as the waves start to rise. In the Atlantic, boats significantly larger than 30 or 40 feet are often sunk due to bad weather.

If you go any smaller, you run the danger of being sunk in a storm. Make the mistake of assuming you can organize your vacation around the possibility of bad weather.

Storms may appear out of nowhere in the unpredictable Atlantic Ocean, and any vessel could be caught off guard, regardless of the season. Although not every 30 or 40-foot yacht is seaworthy enough to cross the North Atlantic, this size is a minimum need for ocean navigation.

Supply Storage

Even if you want to conduct as much open-ocean fishing as possible while crossing the Atlantic, you’ll need to have supplies. You should have enough food and drink for everyone in your crew to last the whole voyage.

Keep in mind that crossings can take longer than expected, so make sure you have adequate supplies to account for delays. You’ll need to reserve gasoline if you’re crossing in a motorboat or if you have a backup motor for your sailboat.

You may need a larger boat if you need to store a lot of provisions for your voyage. Too much weight can cause your boat to sink in the water, making even a seaworthy boat much less seaworthy. A boat that is too low in the water might be swamped by waves more quickly.

Before you load up your boat and set out on the water, be sure you know how much it can securely handle.

Comfort Of The Crew

Until you’ve spent a few weeks out on the open sea aboard a 30 or 40-foot boat, it may appear to be rather large. If you want to enjoy your passage, you’ll need a boat large enough for everyone on board to have their own space and stretch their legs at regular intervals throughout the journey. Even with a one- or two-person crew, 30 to 40 feet is required to achieve this aim.

Crossing The Atlantic In A Motorboat

You might be surprised to learn how much gasoline it takes to cross the Atlantic in a powerboat. Simply storing all of that fuel aboard your yacht can take up a lot of space.

Fuel should not be utilized for longer than 90 days in most cases. This should be enough time for you to cross the Atlantic, but it could not be. You may preserve fuel for up to six months or even two years if you use a fuel stabilizer or don’t mix it before use.

Fuel storage will require a large portion of your entire storage space. For the same journey, you could require a larger motorboat than a sailboat.

The advantage of crossing in a motorboat is that, while it may require more storage and gasoline, utilizing it instead of the wind for movement may make your route much more predictable. A speedboat can move in nearly any situation except particularly severe and inclement weather, but a sailboat must wait for the wind to be right to make headway. As a result, you won’t need as many resources to prepare in case you don’t arrive at your location on time.

Enjoy Your Crossing

It’s difficult to imagine a more thrilling experience than sailing the Atlantic Ocean on your own boat. You will most likely have a very pleasurable vacation whether what kind of boat you choose, as long as you choose a boat of at least 30 or 40 feet and plan wisely.

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

BoatingNarrative

Can A Yacht Make It Across The Atlantic? (Factors To Consider)

When it comes to crossing the Atlantic Ocean, there is no one-size-fits-all answer. The type of yacht you choose, the route you take, and the conditions you face will all affect how long it takes you to make the crossing.

In this blog, we’ll take a look at some of the factors you need to consider when making the decision to sail across the Atlantic.

Can A Yacht Make It Across The Atlantic

The First Question You Need to Ask Yourself Is What Type of Yacht Is Best Suited for an Atlantic Crossing?

There are a few different options, and the best one for you will depend on your experience and budget. If you’re a beginner sailor, you may want to consider a smaller boat that is easier to handle. If you’re an experienced sailor, you may want to go for a larger boat that can handle rough seas.

Once you’ve chosen the type of yacht, you need to consider the route you’ll take. The best way to cross the Atlantic is usually via the Cape Verde Islands or South America. These routes are shorter and more direct, which means that your sailing time will be shorter. However, these routes are also more challenging, so it’s important to choose one that you’re confident you can handle.

How Long Can You Sail a Yacht Across the Atlantic?

How Long Can You Sail a Yacht Across the Atlantic

This will be determined by a variety of things, including the size of your yacht, the route you take, and the weather conditions. Most yachts can make the crossing in about two weeks, but it’s important to be prepared for rough seas and possible delays.

Assuming twenty days at 12 knots per day, a yacht crossing the Atlantic can travel 2,880 nautical miles at an average speed of 14.5 knots (nautical miles/hour).

This number assumes no stormy conditions can slow down your voyage west across the Atlantic Ocean, however, if the sailing time is extended due to rough ocean waters or winds preventing you from reaching every mile at its fastest sailing rate.

How Much Fuel Do You Need to Make It Across the Atlantic?

How Much Fuel Do You Need to Make It Across the Atlantic

This will vary depending on the size of your yacht and the route you take. On average, you’ll need about 100 liters of fuel per day to make the crossing. Note: Fuel consumption at a speed of 15 knots will be increased during emergencies thanks to going at full throttle.

How Long Can Your Yacht Sail Without Refueling?

The average cruising yacht can sail for about three weeks without refueling. However, this can differ depending on the yacht’s size and engine type. The weather should also be taken into account. The Atlantic is a notoriously windy ocean and can be treacherous in the winter months. 

-Make sure you have a good weather forecast and are prepared for rough seas. 

-Make sure the sails are in good condition, the hull is clean and free of barnacles, and the engine is well-maintained.

-Finally, you need to make sure your yacht is in good condition.

How Do You Choose the Right Boat for Your Atlantic Crossing?

How Do You Choose the Right Boat for Your Atlantic Crossing

The trip can be made by several different types of vessels. The most popular are sailboats. Sailboats are the best choice for those looking for a more leisurely crossing. They can sail with the wind and don’t have to rely on engines to get them across.

This makes for a more enjoyable crossing, but it also means that the crossing can take longer. If you’re looking for a quicker crossing, you may want to consider a powerboat. Powerboats can make the crossing much faster, but they can also be more difficult to sail. 

Another factor to think about while selecting a boat is its size. For a crossing of this length, you’ll want a boat that’s at least 30 feet long. This will give you enough room to sleep, eat, and store your belongings. You’ll also want a boat that’s stable in bad weather. A boat that’s too small or too unstable could be dangerous in rough seas. 

Finally, you’ll want to think about the type of sailing you’ll be doing. If you are doing a lot of sailing, you’ll want a boat with a good autopilot. If you are mostly motoring, you’ll want a boat with a good engine.

How Many Sailors Do It?

The number of sailors who make the crossing every year varies, but it’s estimated that about 1,000 yachts make the crossing each year.

Across the Atlantic, there are many sailors that complete the voyage in a motor yacht. In order to make it across, the yacht must have enough fuel capacity, and the time of year must be right. The ocean can be a harsh place, so a sailing yacht is not always the best option.

How Do You Set Sail Across the Atlantic?

How Do You Set Sail Across the Atlantic

The process of setting sail for an Atlantic crossing can be daunting, but it’s not as difficult as it seems. The first step is to double-check that you have all of the necessary supplies, including food, water, fuel, and spare parts. Once you’re ready, you can set sail for the open ocean.

  • The weather can be a major factor in deciding whether or not to set sail
  • You’ll want to make sure you have enough fuel to make the trip
  • It’s important to make sure your yacht is in good condition and is properly equipped for the journey

How Big Does a Yacht Have to Be to Cross the Atlantic?

There is no one definitive answer to the question of how big a yacht must be to make a successful transatlantic crossing. The size of the yacht, its draft, the number of crew and passengers, and the weather conditions at the time of the crossing will all be factors in the success or failure of the voyage. 

That said, a yacht that is too small may not have the stability or range required to make the journey, particularly in rough weather. A yacht that is too large may be unwieldy and difficult to manage in tight quarters or in choppy seas. 

In general, a yacht that is at least 50 feet long with a draft of at least six feet will have the stability and range to make a successful crossing. However, experienced ocean sailors may choose a smaller or larger yacht depending on the conditions they expect to encounter. 

Many yachtsmen opt to cross the Atlantic in a catamaran, which is more stable and has a greater range than a monohull yacht. Catamarans also tend to be faster than monohulls, making them a desirable option for longer crossings.

How Far Can You Travel on a Yacht?

While most yachts can only travel about 500 miles per day, there are a few that can travel up to 1,000 miles per day. Yachts can also travel from the Mediterranean to the United States. The longest route for a yacht is the Great Circle Route. This is a route that goes around the world.

Yachts can travel up to 25 knots (29 miles per hour). This is the cruising speed for most yachts. The speed of a yacht depends on the wind and the waves. The wind can push a yacht in the direction that it is going. The waves can help a yacht move forward.

There are many things that a yacht captain needs to know before they set sail. They need to know the weather conditions, the winds, and the waves. They also need to know the route that they are taking.

Can a Yacht Survive Through Rough Seas?

Can a Yacht Survive Through Rough Seas

Yes, a yacht can survive through rough seas, but it’s important to choose the right boat and to be prepared for the worst. Ensure that you have enough food and water and fuel to make it through any type of weather.

 However, you need to be prepared for all kinds of conditions. Headwinds can slow down yachts, and the middle of the ocean can be a lonely place.

  • Yachts need to be well-equipped for the journey.
  • They need to have sturdy hulls that can withstand the impact of waves.
  • Make sure they have strong masts and rigging.
  • Yachts need to have a good supply of food and water.
  • They need to have charts and navigational tools.

What Are the Pros and Cons of Sailing Across the Atlantic?

The pros of sailing across the Atlantic include getting to enjoy the wide ocean and seeing some of the world’s most magnificent vistas.

It’s difficult to beat the difficulty and adventure of sailing such a great distance. The ocean is also a great place to get away from it all, and there is a sense of freedom that comes with sailing on the open seas.

There are also a few potential cons to consider. One is the fact that weather conditions can be unpredictable, and storms can pop up quickly. Navigation can also be difficult in open water, and there is always the possibility of running into trouble.

Another consideration is the distance itself. The 3,000-mile Atlantic passage from Europe to the Americas is arduous, and it might take weeks or even months to complete.

In the end, whether or not to sail across the Atlantic is a personal decision. Those who are drawn to the challenge and adventure of such a voyage will likely find it an unforgettable experience. However, it’s critical to be aware of the hazards and to be prepared for the worst.

How Many Yachts Make the Crossing Every Year?

The number of yachts that make the crossing every year varies, but it’s estimated that about 1,000 yachts make the crossing each year.

The journey typically starts in late summer, when the westerly winds are strongest. It’s a great experience to motor across the north Atlantic, and many boats have successfully completed the crossing.

  • The weather can be a major factor in deciding whether or not to set sail.
  • You’ll want to make sure you have enough fuel to make the trip.
  • It’s important to make sure your yacht is in good condition and is properly equipped for the journey.

How Long Does It Take to Make the Crossing?

On average, it takes about two weeks to make the crossing, but it can take longer if you encounter bad weather.

The journey can take longer if the yacht anchors in harbors, but this can also add to the cost of the trip. The bluewater sailing is a beautiful experience, but it is important to be aware of the weather conditions and to have sufficient supplies on board.

How Much Does It Cost to Make the Crossing?

The cost of making the crossing will vary depending on the type of yacht you choose and the route you take. However, on average, it costs about $5,000 to make the crossing.

Making a crossing from the US East Coast to Europe on a yacht can be a costly and time-consuming proposition. The main costs are fuel, food, and berthing. There are several ways to reduce the costs.

  • Using a solar panel to power the boat can reduce the need for fuel.
  • A bigger boat will also provide more space for provisions, and sailing on a freighter can avoid the need for berthing fees.
  • The main challenge is the distance.

What Are the Dangers of Sailing Across the Atlantic?

The dangers of sailing across the Atlantic are storms, rough seas, and pirates. It’s critical to be ready for the worst and have a strategy in place in the event of an emergency. Sailors must be aware of the risks of sailing in open water, and they need to be prepared for the challenges they may encounter.

One of the biggest dangers of sailing across the Atlantic is the weather. Sailors need to be prepared for all types of weather, from storms to high winds to hurricanes. They also need to be aware of the weather patterns in the area they are sailing in, and they need to be prepared for the possibility of encountering bad weather.

Another danger of sailing across the Atlantic is the ocean itself. The ocean is a huge and unpredictable area, and sailing through it can be dangerous. Sailors must be aware of the risks of sailing in open water, and they need to be prepared for the challenges they may encounter.

What Type of Yacht Is Best Suited To Make It Across The Atlantic?

The type of yacht that makes it across the Atlantic depends on where you want to go. If you’re going to Europe, you should consider buying a yacht that has been built specifically for ocean crossings. These yachts are designed to withstand rough conditions and make crossing the ocean easier.

  • Look at the size of the yacht before you buy it. Bigger yachts are safer and more stable than smaller ones.
  • Consider the length of the yacht. Longer yachts are safer than shorter ones.
  • Check if the yacht has an engine room. This is important because engines can fail during storms.
  • Look at what kind of sails the yacht has. Some yachts have sails that are made of canvas, while others use metal sails. Metal sails are stronger and last longer than canvas sails.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Crossing the Atlantic by Motor Yacht Routes

Crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht is a challenging but rewarding experience. There are a number of different routes that you can take, and the best route for you will depend on your experience, the type of boat you are sailing, and the time of year you plan to sail.

Here are some of the most popular routes for crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht:

  • The North Atlantic Route: This route is the most direct route across the Atlantic Ocean. It starts in Europe and ends in the Caribbean. The North Atlantic Route is generally the fastest route, but it can also be the most challenging. The weather conditions in the North Atlantic can be unpredictable, and there is a risk of encountering icebergs.
  • The South Atlantic Route: This route is less direct than the North Atlantic Route, but it is generally considered to be safer. The South Atlantic Route starts in Europe and ends in South America. The weather conditions in the South Atlantic are more stable, and there is no risk of encountering icebergs.
  • The Azores Route: This route is a good option for those who are looking for a more leisurely crossing. The Azores Route starts in Europe and ends in the Azores Islands. The Azores Islands are a group of volcanic islands in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. They offer a safe haven for yachts crossing the Atlantic, and they also offer a variety of amenities and attractions.

No matter which route you choose, it is important to do your research and plan carefully. You should also make sure that you have the proper safety equipment on board, and that you are familiar with the weather conditions and hazards that you may encounter.

Here are some additional tips for crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht:

  • Plan your route carefully. There are a number of different routes that you can take across the Atlantic Ocean. It is important to plan your route carefully and to choose a route that is appropriate for your experience and the time of year you plan to sail.
  • Check the weather forecast. It is important to check the weather forecast before you set sail. The weather conditions in the Atlantic Ocean can change quickly, so it is important to be aware of the potential hazards.
  • Have the proper safety equipment on board. It is important to have the proper safety equipment on board your yacht, including life jackets, flares, and a first-aid kit.
  • Be prepared for the worst. The Atlantic Ocean is a large and unpredictable body of water. It is important to be prepared for the worst, and to have a plan in place in case of an emergency.

By following these tips, you can help to ensure a safe and enjoyable crossing of the Atlantic Ocean.

There are many different ways to cross the Atlantic by motor yacht. Some people prefer to go straight across, while others choose to sail along one of the great circle routes. There are also a number of different options for stopping along the way, depending on your preferences and needs. Here we will explore some of the most popular routes for crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht.

Setting sail from the United States to Europe is an amazing adventure. While it’s possible to fly across the Atlantic, there’s something special about taking a leisurely journey by motor yacht. Here are some popular routes for crossing the Atlantic by yacht. The most popular route for crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht is from Newport, Rhode Island to Cowes, England. This route takes advantage of the prevailing winds and currents, making for a relatively easy journey. The trip can be done in as little as two weeks, but most people take four to six weeks to enjoy all that this amazing voyage has to offer. Another popular route is from Fort Lauderdale, Florida to Porto Santo in Portugal. This longer journey takes advantage of the Gulf Stream, which helps push yachts along at a good clip. Most people take three to four weeks to complete this voyage. No matter which route you choose, crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht is an incredible experience that you’ll never forget!

Crossing the Atlantic by Motor Yacht Routes

Credit: godownsize

What are Some Good Motor Yacht Routes for Crossing the Atlantic

There are many motor yacht routes for crossing the Atlantic, but some are better than others. The best route depends on the time of year, the weather conditions, and the boat’s speed and range. One good route is to start from Portugal or Spain and head west to the Canary Islands. From there, you can continue west to Cape Verde and then turn north towards the Lesser Antilles. This route takes advantage of the prevailing winds and currents in this part of the world. Another option is to start from Bermuda and head east towards Puerto Rico. This route is shorter, but it can be more difficult because of the strong trade winds that blow from east to west across this part of the ocean. Which route you choose will also depend on your destination. If you’re headed for Florida or the Gulf Coast of the United States, starting from Bermuda makes more sense. But if you’re headed for Europe or Africa, starting from Portugal or Spain is a better option. No matter which route you choose, crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht is an adventure that you’ll never forget!

What are Some Things to Consider When Planning a Motor Yacht Crossing of the Atlantic

When planning a motor yacht crossing of the Atlantic, there are a few things to consider. The first is the route. There are two main routes- one via the Canary Islands and one via Bermuda. The Canary Islands route is shorter, but has more potential for bad weather. The Bermuda route is longer, but generally has better weather. The second thing to consider is provisioning. A motor yacht uses a lot of fuel, so you will need to make sure you have enough onboard to get you across the Atlantic. You will also need to have enough food and water for everyone on board, as well as any emergency supplies that might be needed. Finally, you will need to consider the weather. This is especially important if you are taking the Canary Islands route. Check the forecast before you set sail and be prepared for any potential storms that could come your way. With some careful planning, a motor yacht crossing of the Atlantic can be a safe and enjoyable experience for everyone involved.

What are Some Hazards to Be Aware of When Crossing the Atlantic by Motor Yacht

When crossing the Atlantic by motor yacht, there are a few hazards to be aware of. First and foremost is the weather. The North Atlantic is notoriously stormy, and even in summer there can be strong winds and waves. It’s important to check the weather forecast before setting out, and to have a plan for what to do if conditions start to deteriorate while you’re at sea. Another hazard is pirates. While piracy is more commonly associated with the waters off Somalia and Indonesia, it does still happen in some parts of the world, including the Caribbean Sea and parts of South America. If you’re planning on sailing through any areas where piracy is known to occur, it’s important to take precautions such as hiring armed guards or sailing in convoy with other boats. Finally, there are also political risks to consider when crossing international waters. Tensions can flare up suddenly between countries, and if you find yourself in the wrong place at the wrong time you could end up getting caught in the middle of a diplomatic incident or even being detained by foreign authorities. Again, it pays to do your research before setting sail and to have a contingency plan for what to do if things go wrong.

What are Some Tips for Making a Successful Transatlantic Crossing by Motor Yacht

When making a transatlantic crossing by motor yacht, there are a few key things to keep in mind in order to have a successful trip. First, it is important to have a well-equipped and well-maintained vessel. This means having all the necessary safety equipment on board and making sure that everything is in good working order before setting out. Secondly, it is crucial to have an experienced crew who knows how to handle the boat and the conditions at sea. Thirdly, it is important to plan your route carefully, taking into account weather patterns and currents. Finally, be prepared for anything and always err on the side of caution when at sea.

Atlantic Crossing in a 2019 Motor Yacht Lagoon 630

There are many ways to cross the Atlantic by motor yacht, but there are three main routes that are most popular. The first route is from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean. This route is popular because it offers good weather and sailing conditions. The second route is from the Azores to Bermuda. This route is popular because it avoids bad weather and has good sailing conditions. The third route is from Newfoundland to the United Kingdom. This route is popular because it offers great scenery and wildlife watching opportunities.

Related: How Long to Cross the Atlantic by Motor Yacht

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

How Far Can Yachts Travel? Helpful Examples (With Numbers)

' src=

There are several things to consider when asking the question: “How far can a yacht journey?”

There are many different variables, including the type of yacht, the size of the fuel tank(s), the weather, and the amount of crew/gear aboard.

Not to mention the skill and experience of the captain.

How Far Can A Yacht Travel?

Generally, a motorized yacht about 35 feet in length can travel around 200 miles at approximately 25 knots in an 8 hour day.  At 35 knots, they can travel close to 300 miles in a day.  With enough fuel or fill-ups, you can go on for thousands of miles.

With the addition of sails, a yacht can travel even further, but it takes longer.

Here’s everything you need to know!

Table of Contents

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

How Far Does the Average Yacht Travel?

This question is difficult to answer on its own.

However, on average, a 75-foot motorized yacht with a tank that can carry 11,000 liters of fuel can travel up to 1500 nautical miles.

If you are comparing your yacht to this average, make sure also to compare your tank size.

For example:

  • A 95-foot yacht with a 9000-liter fuel tank can travel up to 1,200 nautical miles.
  • A 40-foot yacht with a 5,000-liter fuel tank can travel up to 3,000 nautical miles.

Think of it this way: the bigger the boat, the bigger the fuel compartment.

The bigger the fuel tank (for the size of the boat,) the farther it can travel.

Other variables can affect those numbers, but these are the main factors you need to consider.

We have an article here with much more statistics and numbers on boating .

How Big is the Fuel Tank on a Yacht?

Different yachts have different-sized gas tanks on board.

The size of the fuel tank has a lot to do with how far it can travel.

After all, no fuel = no travel, right?

Not necessarily.

For a motorized yacht, there are really only two things to consider when trying to determine the distance it can travel:

  • The amount of fuel you have (or how big the tank is)
  • How much of it is burned by the engines (which is affected by different factors)

Side note: generally speaking, it is a good idea to have about one and a half times the amount of fuel you will need for the trip you want to make.

Different weather conditions can affect how slow your trip is, as well. Yachts are slower in rough weather. If there are bad weather conditions, yachts won’t be able to travel as far. On the opposite side, a yacht can travel much further in optimum weather conditions, when the engines don’t have to fight against the wind and choppy waters.

On the other hand, sailing boats are powered by the winds on the sea.

Weather can be finicky, and, because of that, most sailing yachts have an alternative form of power.

Some of those include:

  • Auxiliary engines, usually diesel-powered
  • Wind generators or solar panels
  • Diesel generators

Remember to read up on international flag rules for boats before leaving.

How Far Can a Yacht Journey with a Full Fuel Tank?

Even superyachts come in different sizes and with different sized fuel tanks.

However, let’s say that you’re on a 130-foot yacht with a fuel tank of 22,420 liters.

If the yacht is cruising at around 20 knots, it can travel about 1500 nautical miles on that fuel tank.

To find how far you can go on one tank of fuel, you will have to:

  • Clean your boat and ensure that everything is working properly (an unmaintained yacht uses more fuel per nautical mile)
  • Refuel your boat and log your engine hours and start/stop times to find your fuel burn rate.
  • Remember, it is important to measure your liters or gallons per hour of use instead of only using your fuel gauge (which might not be accurate over the full scale).
The fuel burn rate calculation is = fuel used / hours, resulting in liters or gallons per hour. The calculation for fuel efficiency is distance/fuel used, resulting in miles per gallon or liters.

The fuel burn rate and fuel efficiency (fuel mileage) are different at different speeds.  If both are calculated at the vessel’s standard cruising speed, the fuel efficiency is the cruising speed divided by the fuel burn rate.

For example, a yacht cruising at 10 knots burning 2.5 gallons per hour has a fuel efficiency of 4 nautical miles per gallon (10 / 2.5).

How Many Days Can you Sail For?

Depending on the vessel, you can sail anywhere from one day (on a small sailing yacht ) to a month, and some boats have sailed around the world without stopping.

You must account for:

  • The number of people on your crew,
  • what supplies you have on board,
  • if you count for the times you dock for supplies or not, and
  • the seaworthiness of your yacht

A 30-foot sailing yacht can carry enough supplies for someone to stay aboard for 90 days (or even longer).

There is a nonstop ocean sailing yacht race where some of the participants stay on their yachts from 110 to 160 days! Some even sail for 200 days!

You can also apply for jobs on boats to travel that far.

Can a Yacht Cross the Pacific Ocean?

Cruising around the world is a big dream for several yacht enthusiasts.

Being able to leave their day-to-day lives and do an amazing adventure like “boating around the world” is a legacy you can leave with your family.

Generally speaking, it takes about 10 – 12 days to cross the Pacific Ocean on a large yacht.

However, not all yachts are capable of making the trip.

The following summary describes the capabilities of the four yacht design categories used in the EU and UK:

Category D Yachts:

Category D yachts are rated for sheltered coasts and inland boating.

This means you can use them in lakes, protected harbors, and rivers. They would be fine as long as the waves don’t reach 4 feet in height as a rule.

However, these boats wouldn’t be able to make the cross-ocean trip.

Category C Yachts:

Category C yachts are used inshore.

Inshore means that you can go away from the protected harbors for some distance, but these boats still can’t handle waves that reach up to 8 feet in height.

So, while they can move safely around large lakes and bays, they still wouldn’t be able to make the cross-ocean trip.

Category B Yachts:

Category B yachts are used offshore and can handle waves that reach up to 13 feet in height and strong winds.

However, you still wouldn’t want to take a category B yacht on the cross-ocean trip because it isn’t self-sustaining.

At least, not for the time it takes to cross the Pacific Ocean. Besides, it wouldn’t do well in rough weather.

Category A Yachts:

Category A yachts can handle waves up to 23 feet in height and wind over 47 knots.

They are also designed to be self-sustainable for long voyages.

In other words, they are explorer’s vessels.

Can a Yacht Cross the Atlantic Ocean?

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

To cross the Atlantic, an average motorized yacht would need a tank with a capacity of about 5000 liters of fuel at a fuel efficiency of 2.5 nautical miles per gallon.

This would be for a fuel use rate of 4 gallons per hour at 10 knots cruising speed.  This is at cruising speed, of course. hey can’t be traveling at maximum speed for long periods of time (which would burn through the fuel faster). 

At 10 knots, the trip (about 3,000 miles) would take 300 hours or 12.5 days.

Sailing yachts travel the Atlantic every year since the only fuel they need is for generators that power onboard appliances.

Though, some fuel may be used to power the boat when the weather isn’t cooperating.

It takes about 4 – 5 days to cross the Atlantic Ocean on a fast yacht going 25 knots .  However, it would take longer in a sailing yacht (which also depends on the winds).

We have much more info on what you need to know about which yacht types can cross oceans. It’s a must-read if you are considering a trip over the bigger oceans on a yacht.

What is a Long-Range Expedition Yacht?

Long-range expedition yachts are yachts that are self-sustaining.

They are also built with long voyages in mind.

They normally feature:

  • Adequate crew capacities, amenities, and storage
  • Have a long cruising range, meaning large capacity fuel and water tanks
  • Have a robust hull for the long trip

They have to withstand extreme weather conditions since they have to travel across large water bodies. They should be able to withstand the effects of sailing thousands of miles of traveling a year.

They must be easy to maintain and operate. This is due to the distance they must travel. After all, these yachts are often operated by a few laymen boaters (in addition to having a few experienced sailors with them).

Fishing trawlers (designed for many days at sea with cabins) are hearty and can travel the same distance (within range of their fuel tanks) as an expedition yacht but are typically not finished as a yacht.

They also have the appearance of a hearty, military-style craft with tall bows, broken sheers, and vertical or forward raking windshields.

If painted naval gray, they definitely fit the aesthetic of a military-grade vessel. But the reason for all of those features is because both expedition yachts and military vessels move long distances for extended periods of time.

Final Thoughts:

The distance that a yacht can travel depends on the size of the fuel tank(s) and the fuel use rate.

A yacht with a large fuel tank or a sailing yacht (which only requires the wind and carries fuel for onboard generators) can travel much further than a small day cruiser yacht.

If you want to take a long voyage, make sure to take the right precautions first. When crossing either the Pacific or the Atlantic Ocean , you must make sure your boat is a category A yacht (or an expedition yacht). You must also ensure that your crew is experienced in crossing the ocean.

If you are on a yacht, it is never recommended to cross the ocean by yourself. While you may handle a smaller boat in waters closer to the shore, there is quite a bit of difference in a large yacht—especially when you are far from land.

You’ll also have to make sure you upgrade some amenities. Your water maker, power generation system, autopilot, and your freezer, just to name a few, are some of the systems which need to be in peak condition when making that long voyage.

In the end, the differences between having a boat that travels a short distance and a long one are:

  • Made for Distance, and
  • Well-Maintained

Click to share...

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

How To Cross the Atlantic, Routes and Timelines

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases. We may also earn commissions if you purchase products from other retailers after clicking on a link from our site.

Before the time of ocean liners and airplanes, crossing the Atlantic used to be a great adventure that took a long time to complete. Nowadays, it’s very different; it’s still a great adventure, but the time it takes to complete has changed.

Here’s how long it takes to cross the Atlantic on various types of boats.



Catamaran2700The Canaries to the Caribbean2-3 Weeks9-10 Knots10.5 – 11.5 MPH
Trimaran2700 The Canaries to the Caribbean 2-3 Weeks9-11 Knots10.5 – 12.7 MPH
Monohull2700 The Canaries to the Caribbean 3-4 Weeks6-8 Knots7-9 MPH
Ocean liner (Queen Mary II)3150New York and Southampton, England 6-8 Days30 Knots35 MPH
(For reference)
Ocean Liner1830New York and Southampton, England (3150 NM)17 Days
Ocean Liner1880New York and Southampton, England (3150 NM)9 Days22 Knots25 MPH
Airplane2010London – New York8 Hours478 Knots550 MPH

Looking at this table we can clearly see that the time it takes to cross the Atlantic has decreased exponentially. Some big developments were of course the steam engine that allowed for bigger and much faster ships to travel the Atlantic while also bringing a lot more cargo.

If we look at the Sailboats in this list, we can see that the more hulls you have the faster it goes (if you want to know more about how that works, check out this article)

There is not a significant difference in time to complete between the catamarans and the trimarans in the short run, but in a circumnavigation of the world, the difference can be huge.

A monohull on the other hand is slower, this is mainly due to the amount of drag this type of hull has.

This table compares different types of boats under the same conditions and adds an airplane as a point of reference.

Transatlantic Crossing in Record Time

Here are the records for the fastest crossings of the Atlantic in a Sailboat.

5d 14h 21min 25s Comanche Monohull201621.44 knots (39.71 km/h)
3d 15h 25min 48sBanque Populaire V Trimaran200932.94 knots (61.00 km/h)
4d 11h 10m 23sSodebo UltimTrimaran201728.35 knots (52.50 km/h)

The 2880 Nautical miles(5330 Km) long route starts at Ambrose Light in New York and finishes on an imaginary line between Lizard Point and Ushant of the coast of England

As you might have noticed, there aren’t any numbers for catamarans since the  classes are divided between monohulls and multihulls.  Since trimarans (three hulls) are faster than catamarans (two hulls), there is no real point in racing a cat.

What you also may have noticed are the ridiculously high speeds these boats are doing. Bear in mind that these are racing boats optimized for speed and made to smash world records.

There’s a big difference between the 28 knots a racing trimaran will make and the 9 knots a cruising catamaran will.

What Type of Sailboat Do You Need To Cross The Atlantic?

Crossing the Atlantic can be done in almost any sailboat or ship. As a matter of fact, it has already been done in small rowboats and open catamarans, so everything is possible.

If your question is what boat should I use to get a somewhat comfortable and safe trip, well, then we have something to talk about.

Choosing between a monohull or a multihull has more to do with personal preferences. Some people really like the stable platform of a catamaran, and others dont think it’s a real way of sailing and wants to be heeling over to its side to fully get that true sailing experience.

For me? Catamaran every day, speed, and comfort, but I’m also not a purist sailor in any way. I’m an adventurist, and the boat is merely a way to experience adventures.

The size I would say matters, bigger usually means it’s safer and can handle bigger waves, although it might be harder to handle on your own I something happens to you or your crew mid-sea.

Most people seem to cross the Atlantic with a boat in the 35 -45 ft spectrum, which fulfills both requirements!

If you are interested in digging deeper into what sized boat you should get, check out my article on Best Sized Catamaran for Ocean Sailin g

Other aspects you might consider are the  size in terms of space onboard , how many people are you doing the passage with, the more people, the easier operating the boat will be. This assumes you have a well-trained crew that you know well.

And what are you going to do once you get there, is it the end of your trip or is the beginning. If you’re doing everything just to cross the ocean and then get someone else to bring it back, that’s one thing. But if its the start of a long adventure, the requirements are different. You are going to want more space for scuba gear, and other toys.

I do think the most important aspect is that you have a seaworthy boat that it’s capable of withstanding weeks on end with sailing in many times rough conditions.

This means that your equipment spent has to be the most expensive and handy, but it needs to be in good condition, and you need to be able to handle your great in every weather.

What Gear Do You Need to Cross the Atlantic?

Not including your average stuff when sailing, such as life vests, etc. There are some great that you might not be on your everyday say m still that could be of high importance during such a formidable sail as this.

  • Emergency food
  • Satellite coms
  • Storm drogue (want to know what it is and how it works,  read  this)
  • Spare parts(tiller, sails, etc.)
  • Entertainment

Different Routes to Cross the Atlantic

Westward route: europe to the caribbean.

According to Jimmy Cornell, a well-known sailor and circumnavigator that has made his own research on the subject, Las Palmas is one of the biggest ports of departure for sailboats crossing the Atlantic.

Around 75’% of the sailboats that arrive in Las Palmas on the Canary Islands will depart for an Ocean crossing.

Getting to The Canary Islands, you should not be in a hurry; there are many very beautiful places en route. No matter where you are coming from this is a good stop well worth a visit.

Coming from the north of Europe, you have France, Spain, and Portugal. Entering from the Mediterranean, you have Italy, Croatia, Greece, and so many other interesting places that you shouldn’t miss unless you’re on a very tight schedule.

Once you reach Las Palmas, you can either go straight towards the Caribbean island of Barbados, or you can do a stop along the way at Cap Verde.

Planing a Stop on Cape Verde

A stop at cap Verde makes sense in many ways; for one, it makes the transatlantic trip more manageable by dividing it into two sections.

The second reason is that it gives you the possibility to stock up on fuel and water that you might have used more than you thought. Since Cap Verde is well developed when it comes to receiving boats doing this type of passage, there is no technical expertise on the island.

From Cap Verde, you can also take a direct flight to Portugal and onwards if the need arises.

Even though you might not plan to stop here, the recommendation is to at least  plan your sailing, so you pass close to the islands,  so if something happens, you can head to Mindelo port and fix it.

Another good reason why you would go close is that the further south you go, the  better chance you will have of catching those sweet tradewinds  that will take you safely and enjoyably to the warm waters of the Caribbean.

Westbound Route On a Catamaran

Sailing west is the preferred option for any sailor and especially if you are on a boat that doesn’t sail perfectly upwind, such as a catamaran.

Sailin g west and using the tradewinds is perfect on a catamaran, the sail will be faster and more comfortable than a monohull of the same size.

Looking at the 2019 ARC (Atlantic Rally for Cruisers), a 55ft french catamaran outclassed the 65 ft professionally sailed monohull with a 10-hour lead. All this while doing yoga on board, something that I can promise was not happening on the monohull.

The stable platform of a catamaran with the wind on your stern makes sailing west on a transatlantic passage perfect for Catamaran.

Eastbound Route: The Caribbean to Europe

Coming back to Europe, I would argue that the same principles are still valid: to stop at or pass by islands close enough to have the option of going into port if need, and using the tradewinds to your advantage.

Considering this, most people leave the Caribbean from Tortola, Britsh virgin islands, or St Marteen. These make great starting points for the eastward journey since they are the last point where there is plenty of fuel, spare parts, and food for the long and sometimes arduous trip back to Europe.

Though it is not necessary, many sailors make a halt at Bermuda; this is a good start to fix anything broken or wait for the right weather before your head on to the next part of your trip.

The Azores, the same goes here, you can skip it, but staying close to it adds safety and comfort if needed, and I would also stop by just to enjoy the islands. It’s a beautiful place and good for a few days of low-intensity cruising.

If you still have some energy left after the trip from Bermuda, one option is to head for a place called Horta. The place is well remembered for its hospitality towards sailors heading towards Europe.

Once you have refueled on diesel and energy, it is time to head for northern Europe. This is usually done by sailing north until the 45th latitude and then heading east.

When is The Best Time to Cross The Atlantic

Choosing a route has a lot to do with your intended purpose of the trip, are you going for a speed record, then going more north might be an option, and accepting the risk might be ok for you and your crew.

If you are going west but more interested in doing it safely and are able to spend a little more time out at sea, then the southern routes mentioned above with a departure date around November and December.

Going west on your way to the Caribbean, you’ll notice the days are getting warmer and longer; this is because going west, you also travel south towards the equator where the days and nights are equally as long be it summer or winter.

This weather window is to avoid the hurricane season in the Caribbean that ends in late November, these are the main risk and must be considered in your plan.

What Is The Best Route For an Atlantic Crossing

Taking into consideration the information above with trade winds, the possibility of breakdowns, and the collective knowledge of the area.

The best route for a westbound Atlantic crossing is from Las Palmas (on the Island of Gran Canarias) to Barbados Via Cap Verde. The best route going east is from St Marteen to the Azores Via Bermuda.

This is, of course, based on the assumptions we have discussed above, and it might not apply to your skillset or aim of the crossing.

Can You Cross the Atlantic Single Handed?

You can definitely cross the Atlantic on your own (short-handed). As a matter of fact, many do every year. Of course, this demands more of the sailor since there is nobody to ask for advice or to help while underway.

Neither is there anyone that will help you with handling sails or maintenance while underway; because of this, it is more dangerous and more difficult to solo sailor sail short-handed as it is also called.

The usual way is to either bring a crew of your own, recruit a crew from the port of exit, or find one online via crewseeker.net.

Is Transatlantic Passages Dangerous?

Sailing in big oceans is never a hundred percent safe. This is why it is an adventure if it was absolutely safe, where would the attractiveness and the excitement lie?

Looking at the data, there aren’t many accidents happening, and of those, there are even fewer that are deadly or leave the crew injured for life.

There are also ways to make it safer; we have discussed boat size and crew skills; other route selection factors are vital. It might not be the quickest to cross the Atlantic, but the southern route seems to be a safer bet.

Prepare yourself, your crew, and the boat, and the chances for accidents will still be there, but they will be small and manageable.

How Lonely Is Crossing The Atlantic?

Spending two to three weeks in the middle of the ocean can definitely be lonely, but it can also be the absolute opposite. If you’re sailing with a crew, you will share the same small space with everyone else, always bumping your elbow. If the weather is rough, you may all be a little tired, which also adds to the group dynamics.

But even if you would get sick and tired of your crew, there are ways to call back home. You might have a Satellite phone, which is expensive by the minute but a lovely way to hear the voice of a loved one back at land. Much better than a text message through Email.

Sending emails has been a pretty straightforward process since the SSB radio started to be utilized.  This type of radio is very simplistic and has good reception up to thousands of miles .

The nice thing with this radio is that it allows for data traffic, which means not only are you able to receive weather updates, but you can also contact your family through Email.

Can You Get Rescued If Something Goes Wrong?

Yes, there might not be a coast guard or anything nearby, and you might be way out to sea, but there is help to get. Since every ship is listening to some set of frequencies, usually, the first step is to call for a Mayday on that channel.

If you’re not getting anyone’s attention, then they might still see you on the AIS, Automatic Identification System, which makes anyone around you know where you are.

Many times the crossing is done together with a lot of other vessels; this gives comfort as they might also be able to help in case of emergency.

If all this fails, you probably also will have your EPIRB,  Emergency  Position Indicating Radio  Beacon , which is a gadget that can be activated through certain triggers such as water, tilt angle, or manually activated.

Once activated, it sends an emergency signal at different frequencies and relays the information back to shore for someone to come help you.

Owner of CatamaranFreedom.com. A minimalist that has lived in a caravan in Sweden, 35ft Monohull in the Bahamas, and right now in his self-built Van. He just started the next adventure, to circumnavigate the world on a Catamaran!

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name and email in this browser for the next time I comment.

Recent Posts

Must-Have Boat Gear for Catamaran Sailors!

Sailing is probably the most gear-intensive activity I've ever done; there are so many decisions to be made about what gear to buy now, for tomorrow, and what to definitely never buy. The gear on...

6 Best Trailerable Trimarans For Bluewater and Coastal Sailing

Having a boat costs a lot of money, even when you are not using it, marina fees, etc. And once it is in the water most sailors never go very far from their "home marina" and sailing will be somewhat...

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Water Sports

Entertainment, miscellaneous, classified ads, what boat do you need for an ocean crossing.

The crossing of an ocean in your sailboat is no easy task; you will need a sturdy and dependable vessel, a good deal of sailing experience, and strong hands-on abilities to be able to repair anything that could go wrong while you are at sea.

It is essential to have the sea boat that is optimal for ocean crossing in terms of size to navigate such a vast distance and remain functionally independent for weeks at a time.

But how large of a boat do you need to cross the ocean? Keep reading the post to find out more information.

What Size Boat For Ocean Crossing?

If you want a quick answer, the Atlantic Rally For Cruisers (ARC), run by the World Cruising Club every year in November from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean, requires a minimum sailboat length of 27 feet for ocean crossing to enter the competition. But most sailboats that cross the ocean are bigger than this.

Keep in mind that it's easier and cheaper to maintain a smaller boat, so you'll be more likely to keep it in good shape. The less likely you are to have problems during the trip, the better your boat is kept. How fast you go and how comfortable you are on board will depend on your boat size.

What Size Boat For Ocean Crossing

Longer water lines typically translate to higher top speeds.

It's safe to assume that, all else being equal, a larger boat will travel at a faster clip than a smaller one, even though there is some variation in speed between boats of the same length due to differences in shape and weight. Remember that the time it will take you to finish your crossing is also impacted by your chosen sailing technique.

For instance, when we sailed across the Atlantic Ocean from east to west in a monohull sailboat measuring 37 feet in length with a keel (a Tayana 37), it took us the same number of days as it did for a Bavaria 46 to complete the journey.

This is because we went further north than they did, where the wind was greater, and we ventured to sail "deeper" downwind than they did, which resulted in our covering fewer miles in the same amount of time as they did even though the wind was stronger.

The larger the boat, the more pleasant the journey will be for its passengers. You could claim that having greater space results in increased levels of comfort as a general rule. This is because larger boats often have more space for lounging, allowing more crew members to be carried on board and traveling more slowly overall.

Given this information, you will want to make the crossing in a boat at least 30 feet long and possibly even longer, depending on how many people you plan to have on board.

However, although a larger boat provides more space, the vessel's design also affects how easily the boat goes through the water, which decides how comfortable the passengers will be on board. For instance, we went with a keel sailboat 37 feet long, had a canoe stern, and was constructed with great care.

The heavy weight and deep keel of the Tayana 37 help keep the boat steady, and the canoe-shaped stern allows for waves following the boat to break naturally, as opposed to hitting a sugar scoop stern, which would cause a large splash and throw the boat off course. These characteristics combine to make the Tayana 37 a sailboat that moves more gently.

Is it possible for yachts to sail between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans?

A yacht is suitable for sailing across the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Sailing or motor yacht can travel between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. It is in your best interest to have a fuel tank that is spacious enough to carry the amount of fuel you anticipate using.

That said, not all yachts can do these kinds of journeys. If you choose to travel across either of these seas, you will want to ensure that you have access to an ocean-worthy boat and the necessary gear and expertise to complete the journey.

Because the fuel capacity of some yachts is insufficient for the journey, those yachts often have to be transported aboard specially adapted freighters.

How Long Does It Take To Cross The Atlantic & Pacific ocean?

It will take you at least 20 days to cross the Atlantic Ocean, and it could take longer if you choose to sail across the ocean rather than use a motor.

It is possible that crossing the Pacific Ocean on a large boat with a powerful motor will take a much longer amount of time, depending on the weather conditions. The amount of fuel you are willing to use significantly impacts how much variation there will be. When you increase the speed of your motor, you will need more fuel. Another option is you can also travel across oceans in a sailboat.

You will consume less gasoline doing this, but your speed will be slower due to the boat's features and the fact that the weather will greatly impact your journey.

What’s the smallest boat you can cross an ocean with? Does boat size matter?

The two most important concerns that typically come to the minds of ambitious sailors considering sailing across the Atlantic or the Pacific Ocean are the following: what is the smallest vessel capable of completing the journey? And does the size of the boat make a difference?

To address your question in a nutshell: yes, boat size does matter for various reasons. On the other hand, there are numerous examples of extremely small boats completing an ocean journey, indicating that other factors are more significant. Let's look at the kind of vessels that can successfully cross an ocean and why.

How Big Of A Boat Do You Need To Cross The Ocean?

If you want to cross the Atlantic Ocean, you will need a boat at least 30 feet long, regardless of whether you plan to sail or motor. For both protection and convenience, the ideal length of your boat is forty feet. Both motoring and sailing across the Atlantic are very different adventures, but to be one of them, you need a boat at least this size. You may also need an even larger boat if you plan to bring other people with you on the voyage.

Why Do You Need A Boat Of 30 Or 40 Ft To Cross The Ocean?

Since it is feasible to sail across the Atlantic Ocean in a much smaller vessel, the question arises as to why you would need a boat that is 30 or 40 feet in length. The answer is that attempting to cross in anything smaller can be very dangerous and becomes increasingly inconvenient as time goes on. This is a simple explanation. A boat of at least this size is desirable for several reasons, including the following:

Seaworthiness

When the waves start to get rough, the last thing you want to do is be confined in a little boat. In the Atlantic Ocean, storms frequently cause the sinking of boats with lengths significantly more than 30 or 40 feet. If it is any smaller than this, there is a significant possibility of sinking during a storm. Do not fall into the trap of believing that you can organize your trip so that it avoids the possibility of poor weather.

Storage of Supplies

You will need to bring supplies across the Atlantic Water, even if you plan to conduct as much open-ocean fishing as you possibly can while traveling across the ocean. You are responsible for packing an adequate supply of food and water for everyone in your crew to last them for the duration of the journey.

Keep in mind that border crossings typically take longer than anticipated, so stocking up on sufficient supplies is essential to account for delays. You will need to conserve fuel if you plan to make the voyage in a motorboat or if your sailboat is equipped with an auxiliary motor in case your primary one breaks down. If you need to bring many goods on your journey, you will probably require a larger boat. Too much weight on a boat might cause it to sit lower in the water, which can make it much less seaworthy, even if the boat would be seaworthy otherwise. When a boat is positioned too low in the water, it increases the likelihood that waves will swamp it.

Before you load up your boat and head out on the water, you must be sure that you are aware of the maximum amount of weight it can safely carry.

The Pleasure of the Staff

Before you've spent a few weeks aboard a vessel of either 30 or 40 feet in length, you might think that it's a rather big boat. If you want the passage to be enjoyable for everyone on board, you need a large enough boat to have its place on the boat and get up and stretch its legs at regular intervals while you are traveling. Even if only one or two people are working toward this objective, a staff of thirty or forty feet is required.

Crossing The Ocean In A Motorboat

It is possible that you will be surprised by the amount of fuel that is required to travel across the Atlantic Ocean in a powerboat. Merely storing all that fuel will use a considerable portion of your boat's available space.

In most cases, fuel should not be utilized for more than ninety days after it has been purchased. Although it should be long enough for you to traverse the Atlantic Ocean, there is a possibility that it is not. If you use a fuel stabilizer or avoid mixing it before, you can store the fuel for a longer period, up to six months or even two years. It is necessary to allocate a sizeable portion of your total storage space for fuel storage. This indicates that you may require a larger motorboat than a sailboat to complete the same journey.

When you travel across in a motorboat, rather than relying on the power of the wind to propel you, you use fuel to power your propulsion, which makes the trip a lot more predictable. However, this comes at the expense of increased storage space and fuel consumption. If you want to progress in a sailboat, you will need to wait until the wind blows in the right direction. On the other hand, a motorboat can travel in almost any condition except extremely stormy and bad weather. As a result, you won't need nearly as many goods to prepare for the possibility that you won't arrive at your destination when you anticipate that you will.

Crossing The Ocean In A Sailboat

The concept of traveling across the Atlantic Ocean by sailboat is one of the most romantic things a person can imagine doing. There is no one else to help you cross the ocean besides the winds from the Atlantic, you and your boat.

However, a high degree of danger is associated with sailing across the Atlantic. The wind must be strong enough to push you along to get you across the lake. If there is no wind, you may end up being adrift in the middle of the ocean for a considerably longer period than you had planned. It is advisable to fit your sailboat with at least a couple of engines if you are not completely committed to traveling only using sailing. Different motors will indeed add weight, which is not what you want. Still, most sailors believe that the added peace of mind from knowing they can motor when needed is well worth the burden of carrying that additional weight.

Bottom Line

It is difficult to think of an activity that would be more exciting than sailing alone across the Atlantic Ocean in your boat. It doesn't matter if you want to go with a monohull or a multihull, a powerboat or a sailboat; as long as you select a vessel that is at least 30 or 40 feet long and makes proper preparations, you should have a voyage that is filled with a lot of fun.

From Our Boat Database

International, subscribe to newsletter, follow us on social.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Get In Touch

[email protected]

How To Submit An AD

Terms Of Use

Privacy Policy

Seller's Contract

Log in or Sign up

You are using an out of date browser. It may not display this or other websites correctly. You should upgrade or use an alternative browser .

Ocean crossing with motor-yacht

Discussion in ' Powerboats ' started by phatzih , Jul 7, 2005 .

phatzih

phatzih Junior Member

Can a fiberglass motor-yacht cross ocean in safe? And if yes, how big it should be? Thank you!  

yipster

yipster designer

same you can ask bout wood, steel, aluminium, papyrus etc. for ocean crossing other criteria are to consider but i think they done it allready in a barrel  
But? I know it might seem a funny question but I can not find a clear answer on the web. I found some web sites about tras-Atlantic rallies and that they have a certain division for motor yachts but nothing about the requirements. I mean is it safe to cross the Atlantic with a 30-40 motor cruiser like the Doral, Fairline, Four Winns and the Bayliner range or it is a stupid idea? And if so, then what is the minimum size of a powerboat to be consider for crossing oceans....? Thanks  

KCook

KCook Senior Member

The issue with the usual cruisers is not so much the size as how they are built. More for coastal work than trans-ocean. Good bang-for-the-buck, but the serious offshore boats come with a high price. Kelly Cook  

ABoatGuy

ABoatGuy Member

phatzih, I don't know how transoceanic rallies work but I would think range would be a huge issue with any of the boats you have mentioned and I don't think any of the manufacturers would endorse a transoceanic trip in these boats (if for no other reason then to keep their legal staffs happy). That said, anything is possible. What could work OK in ideal conditions could be a life threatening disaster if things turned nasty. The oceans of the world have been traversed by some pretty strange "craft", but I think the "stupid idea" description works well in this case. As someone famous once said "Just my opinion, but I could be wrong"  
Thank you for your replies. If I got it right, the answer is “it is not recommended but is possible”. So those beautiful and stylish cruisers can actually make it “to the other side” and are not just sailboats or big-ugly-aluminium fishing boats that cross the Atlantic. And joining an organised transatlantic rally with a Bayliner is safe (in the worst case the big, ugly boats will save you ). In other words, whatever can go from UK to Greece can also go to California (in ideal conditions)  

mackid068

mackid068 Semi-Newbie Posts Often

It's a YES, a definate yes. But the best thing to do is a nice, safe, 40'+ fiberglass or steel or aluminium trawler such as a Nordhavn. Check out nordhavn.com By the way, how's the Bayliner build quality? I've only heard poor things. And what's the boat you're going to cross in? Hardtop?  
I would say "no", not definite yes. Or at least the risks would be unacceptable to me. Different folks have very different views on risk factors. Kelly  
No? It's definately POSSIBLE, but not SMART, especially in such a poor quality boat as a Bayliner...maybe in a trawler type vessel or a converted commercial vessel if not a proper cruising sailboat (with a nice keel).  

PAR

PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

Massagemaking vessels (ocean crossing boats) are built with a different set of requirements and design decisions, then the local harbor play toy of the folks who've gotten a second mortgage. You could cross the ocean in a 12' jon boat if you were well prepared and were really into pain and bailing, but it wouldn't be advisable without a support craft (likely a hefty passagemaker with the sane people aboard) to dig you out of the holes you likely get yourself into. Typical issues are the ability to carry enough fuel for 3,000 plus miles, a hull form and size to insure a level of safety and comfort you can live with, scantlings and construction methods that will maintain the wet stuff on the outside of the craft, provisions stowage, navigation requirements, plumbing facilities, drinking water and a host of other issues that need addressing. A passagemaker is self reliant, carries all she needs and generally can repair herself in the event of routine break downs. Anything other then a real passagemaker, requires a support vessel, like rowing across the Atlantic in a dinghy or puttering across in a jon boat. The smaller the boat, the larger the support craft needs to be. You're not really crossing the ocean in a row boat, but actually rowing a boat in the ocean. The support vessel carries the food, fuel and dry toilet paper, etc. all things you can't do without, so really your just rowing a boat in the ocean or puttering a jon boat in the ocean, not making a passage. A passage requires redundancy, power, stores and ability to handle what may come. The local harbor queen, with fancy tri-color cove stripes and all in one, plastic combination galley/head/standup shower stall/nav. station will be ill equipped to survive conditions in open water. Generally these boats are for protected or semi-protected waters, found near shore. These boats are easily recognizable, they have a cup holder in the head, next to the laptop power port. They can't carry the gear, food, supplies, fuel, water, nor do you want to be boarded by any waves or in seas very big. One good wave can wipe the roof right of the cabintop on one of these puddle hoppers, don't even talk about the acres of windows (they're not ports on these boats) that will be stoved in on the first boarding sea. If it gets tossed off a 30' wave crest and crashes down the face into the trough, it will likely pop it's deck to hull joint. Log onto Bayliner's web site and get an estimate for fuel consumsion on a boat in the size range you'll be interested in. Then figure out how many gallons of fuel you'll need to have aboard to provide 3,000 - 3,500 miles of steaming ability. You'll have to install 1,000 gallon fuel bladders everywhere, arranged in every space available and on deck, just to have the range. The choice of hull material has nothing to do with the ability of a yacht to be a passagemaker. There's a reason passagemakers cost so much . . . There's also an old saying about never being at sea in a boat smaller then the waves you'll meet.  
PAR said it better than I could. Just want to add that even being shepherded by a support craft is no sure thing. In a severe storm you will become separated from your support craft. Then all he can do is supply your last known position for your memorial service. Kelly  

FAST FRED

FAST FRED Senior Member

That being stated ., a smalish craft , designed and constructed for the job can readily cross oceans. 20ft sail boats have circumnavigated , but of course they didn't need to worry about carring fuel for 2500 to 3000 miles. 35 to 40 ft is considered the bottom size for a couple , with some minimum of comforts An ocean designed 35 ft power boat could easily have 3000 mile range , esp with a well selected modern diesel . The cost would be 3 or 4X what a production cookie would cost , as the hull would be 4 times as sturdy , the cabin glass 10X as expensive , as would ocean grade hatches . Can you do it ?, Sure if you can afford a cu$tom build. Can a stunt be done in a plastic cheapo? , maybe , but your risking the crews life every single inch of ocean crossing. FAST FRED  
Thank you for your replies. I am far from planning this trip yet. I am thinking of buying a 27-30 feet cruiser next year. I mainly want it for cruising the Mediterranean (Spain and Greek islands). My first choice are the Chaparral 270 ( http://www.chaparralboats.com/sig270.asp ) and Cruiser 280 ( http://www.cruisersyachts.com/cruisers_content.html ). So I was thinking that if a bigger one (30-40 feet) enables me to travel worldwide then it worth saving for a couple of years more as well as getting a bigger loan to buy a 30-40 feet. Of course I am not considering boats like Nordhavn ( www.nordhavn.com ) which is exactly what I mean when saying “big-ugly-aluminium fishing boats”. Comparing those boats with beauties like the Sessa range ( www.sessamarine.com ) is like comparing my girlfriend with Kylie Minogue …my girlfriend can do the job well but if I had to pay £100.000 for the job I would rather pay Kylie. Unfortunately according to your replies a 30-40 feet cruiser like those I am looking can not do the job at all. So I will better stick with the 27-30 feet range which cost less than £100.000 and can at least sail the Mediterranean (according to what dealers say)….as the song goes…”I've never been to the USA I am slave on a minimum wage Detroit, New York and LA, but I'm stuck in the UK” Thank you all…  

woodboat

woodboat Senior Member

I guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I can't stand those bubble looking inverted turtle designs that people call sleek. I would much rather have the nordhavn. I also like this http://www.yachtworld.com/core/list...&units=Feet&checked_boats=1330757&slim=quick& My current boat is a 50 ft Burns craft houseboat. Who cares what the people you cruise by think. I much prefer comfort onboard for myself and guests. I suggest you find a boat that is usefull for your needs foremost.  
  • Advertisement:
If your interest is U.S. built cruisers, then here is a good discussion on another site - BoatUS Club House Messageboards : ... : Trailerable Cruisers Kelly  

oliverpatterson

Ocean Jet Boat?

KeithO

Budget long range cruiser fit for Pacific crossing - Ideas ?

  • No, create an account now.
  • Yes, my password is:
  • Forgot your password?

Boat Design Net

  • Yachting World
  • Digital Edition

Yachting World cover

Atlantic crossing: When’s the best time to go?

Yachting World

  • November 11, 2021

When it comes to an Atlantic crossing there are clearly defined weather windows. But how flexible can you be and what challenges are you like to face? Weather Guru Chris Tibbs reports.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

An Atlantic crossing or Atlantic circuit has often been seen as a year-long adventure, crossing the ocean in late November or December to the Caribbean , with a return to Europe starting in May.

There are good reasons for this timetable, the overriding one being the hurricane season. This runs from the beginning of June through to the end of November. Hurricanes can happen outside of the ‘official season’, but they are rare – although the last few years have all seen named storms in May.

By departing towards the end of November, with the bulk of the crossing in December, we maximise the Caribbean season, often coming back to Europe after Antigua Race Week in May.

The Caribbean winter season now begins with two major events starting in January; the RORC Transatlantic Race, and for this year an additional January departure for the ARC. Both are scheduled to depart early January from Lanzarote and Gran Canaria respectively.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Not much to split them? Using reanalysis data and routing software the routes in green show late November departures and those in red January

Interestingly, for the actual crossing from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean, statistics show that the wind tends to become stronger as we get into January and February – so there may be some truth in the Christmas trade winds that we hear about starting to blow around Christmas and lasting well into the following months.

Article continues below…

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

What downwind sails should you have for an Atlantic crossing?

What downwind sails should you buy for an Atlantic crossing or cruising beyond the Caribbean? This is one of the…

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Chris Tibbs on a dream Atlantic crossing and a heavenly Caribbean winter

There is only one adjective that adequately describes our transatlantic crossing with the ARC last year and the season of…

When departing the Canaries the prevailing wind direction is from north through to east-north-east. These are the trade winds found on the eastern side of the semi-permanent high pressure which we know as the Azores high. The wind blows from this direction for 55-65% of the time with little variation from November to March. However, averages do not tell us everything and we do get a number of days when the Canaries are affected by low pressure passing close to the north.

Winter winds

This is important for a pleasurable passage; few people enjoy headwinds when supposedly on a downwind passage or race. Near the Canaries the wind is between south and west for around 10% of the time in December and higher at 14% in January. That is not a huge difference and the variability between years makes it hard to make firm predictions.

There are lots of statistics from different sources and although they roughly agree the older pilot charts and routing charts tend to indicate a higher incidence of trade winds, while winds derived from newer satellite observations show more variability.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

Harry Scott leaving the Canaries.

When looking at reanalysis data we see an even greater variation in the wind patterns, and this is consistent with a greater variability in the weather which we expect with climate change.

Additionally, if the wind becomes south-westerly, the average strength tends to increase from November and December through to February. This is an indication of deeper winter depressions passing closer to, and affecting the Canary Islands.

On the way across there will remain a small chance of south-westerly winds which decreases the further south and west you get; mid-Atlantic adverse and light winds are generally linked to the tail of cold fronts splitting the Azores high or more rarely areas of low pressure.

When to go?

To compare conditions between months, I ran some weather routing for a late November and an early January departure. This was from the Canaries to St Lucia using 11 years of reanalysis data from 2010-2020 departing in late November and early January. By using the polars from a cruiser-racer production boat some of the results were quite surprising.

The earlier departures gave a greater range of routes with the January departures slightly closer to the direct route and to the south; this reflects the expected stronger winds (from historical data) with shorter courses following closer to the great circle route.

However, the main surprise came with the timings as the late November departures were on average 10 hours faster than the January ones. This didn’t make a great deal of sense because historical data, as well as anecdotal evidence from the Caribbean, suggested the later crossings should have stronger and steadier trade winds.

But by looking at the routes and weather patterns a little more closely, I found that on four of the January routes there was low pressure in the central and eastern Atlantic that was further south than usually expected and impacted on the first part of the route. This gave moderate to strong headwinds and a slow start to the passage which was followed by light winds until the trade winds filled in after the lows had moved away.

can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

An unusually large low in January, completely disturbing the trade winds

So a January passage on a ‘good’ year should, given long term average conditions, be faster with stronger wind particularly on the latter part of the passage. But, rather significantly, there is a greater chance of low pressure affecting the Canary Islands and delaying the start if cruising, or giving a period of beating if racing.

Planning our sailing is rarely as simple as deciding a date on which we are leaving. Something that should be taken equally seriously is the weather expected on the passage to the Canary Islands. This is more important when heading south from the UK and north-west Europe, although it must also be taken into consideration when departing from the Mediterranean.

Head south early

The usual advice is to get south as early as possible, as an easier passage will be had in September rather than leaving it until November or December. If crossing the Bay of Biscay, once into September the likelihood of gales increases, as does the probability of south-westerly winds.

In September pilot charts indicate that gales in northern Biscay are likely 3% of the time, which increases to 7% in October and 9% in November. We also get a significant increase in south-westerly winds; this reflects the passing of lows to the north-west which tend to pass further south during autumn and winter.

sailing-autopilots-ARC-2016-credit-TimBisMedia

Classic tradewind setup for an Atlantic crossing. Photo: TimBisMedia

There are some breaks in the weather as cold fronts rattle through veering the wind to the north-west and occasionally to the north. As the season progresses so does the likelihood that the Portuguese trade winds will fail, giving a beat south down the Portuguese coast only picking up the trade winds south of the latitude of Gibraltar.

As we’ve seen from the start of races from France in the autumn, there can be a high attrition rate before the yachts have even left Biscay. It’s not that you can’t cross Biscay in any month, but the later it’s left the longer the time between weather windows and the shorter the weather windows tend to be. This can lead us to make choices based on necessity rather than prudence.

Once south of Portugal we should get into the start of the trade winds – but we still need to watch for lows further south than normal.

While most yachts arrive in the Canary Islands having had a good sail, there are always a number that get caught out and end up beating for some of the way – usually yachts that have left it late and are on a tight schedule. This is also true for yachts leaving the Mediterranean and it’s not uncommon for yachts to have to wait in Gibraltar for strong westerly winds to diminish.

Whether intending to start your transatlantic in November or wait until later, I prefer to see boats south of Biscay well before the end of September and would not be far behind if leaving from the Med.

A crossing in January will generally have stronger winds, but there’s a greater chance of headwinds particularly when getting away from the Canary Islands. Whenever you decide to cross, getting to the Canaries early is important and the later you leave it to get south the more chance there is of having to wait for a weather window.

If you enjoyed this….

Yachting World is the world’s leading magazine for bluewater cruisers and offshore sailors. Every month we have inspirational adventures and practical features to help you realise your sailing dreams. Build your knowledge with a subscription delivered to your door. See our latest offers and save at least 30% off the cover price.

IMAGES

  1. What Size Motor Yacht Can Cross The Atlantic

    can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

  2. Can Superyachts Cross The Atlantic?

    can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

  3. What Size Motor Yacht Can Cross The Atlantic

    can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

  4. The Viking 70 ft motor yacht profile

    can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

  5. JOHNSON 70 FLYBRIDGE 70ft 2023 Johnson Yacht For Sale JFA Yacht Ship

    can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

  6. This submarine yacht can cross the Atlantic Ocean, twice, on one tank

    can a 70 foot yacht cross the atlantic

VIDEO

  1. Bering 70 Expedition Yacht: Navigating Luxury at Sea! 🛥️💫 #Shorts

  2. CLIPPER 2023-24

  3. This 17ft boat is going to cross the Atlantic!

  4. World Yacht Race: Chinese crew join this year's Clipper Race

  5. The Clipper 70 arrives in London ahead of week at St Katharine Docks

  6. SOLO Atlantic Crossing on an TINY 18ft(5m) sailboat

COMMENTS

  1. What Size Yacht To Cross The Atlantic? (Here's What You Need to Know)

    The size of yacht needed to safely and comfortably cross the Atlantic Ocean will depend on factors such as the number of people on board, the type of voyage, and the experience of the captain and crew. Generally, the vessel should be a minimum of 36 feet in length and have enough stowage capacity to carry enough supplies and provisions for the ...

  2. Can Yachts Cross the Ocean

    Yes, mega yachts and superyachts can cross the Atlantic or the Pacific Ocean. We know it would take a superyacht around 10 days to cross, but the Pacific Ocean is a larger body of water for superyachts to cross but it is possible to do so. When yachts are traveling from the US to areas such as Fiji or the Islands of Tahiti, the boats will sail ...

  3. Can Superyachts Cross The Atlantic?

    Superyachts can definitely cross the Atlantic - some with absolute ease. There are routes from the United States to Europe that stretch for just over three thousand miles, a distance which some superyachts can swallow up in no time. They're also big enough to handle any adverse Atlantic weather. Read on to learn more about superyachts and ...

  4. The right yacht for an Atlantic crossing

    Last year, when we carried out our annual survey of ARC skippers, we found that yachts of between 46ft and 55ft had a battery capacity, on average, of 700ah, rising to 1,000ah for yachts over 56ft ...

  5. Crossing the Atlantic Ocean on a Trawler Yacht

    Experienced cruisers often discover Kadey-Krogen Yachts because they begin to search for yachts capable of crossing the Atlantic. If one searches the listings for Transatlantic boats for sale or contacts a broker with a very specific request to hear about yachts that can cross the Atlantic, they're bound to discover plenty of superyachts, and some custom trawlers, and, of course, a selection ...

  6. Best Yachts for Transatlantic Crossing: Our Selection and Advice for 2023

    The best yachts for a transatlantic crossing. Neel 51. Outremer 5X. Hallberg-Rassy 57. There are many yachts which are suitable for a transatlantic passage. Some will be less expensive, some will be more comfortable, faster, or better suited to you, your experience, and your budget.

  7. Transatlantic crossing with a supercat 70ft Sunreef catamaran this

    Keen on the ultimate yachting adventure and once in a lifetime experience? We are pleased to recommend a NEW 2022 model fo SUNREEF 70 ready for the transatlantic crossing. With a top captain, full gear and all inclusive service, you can cross the Atlantic in luxury …. Only a few years ago, crossing the Atlantic was an adventure for only a few hardcore sailors.

  8. What kind of boats cross the Atlantic Ocean? 7 Options explained

    There are also sailing cargo Atlantic crossing possibilities out there. ' Tres Hombres ' is a 32 metres Schooner transporting traditional goods like rum and chocolate between the Caribbean and Europe. Timbercoast is a 1920 built 43.5m Schooner that transports goods like coffee and gin.

  9. Preparing to cross the Atlantic

    And completing an Atlantic crossing is the dream of many a sailor. But the sea can be a formidable mistress so it pays to prepare well, making sure everything is ship shape before a longer ocean passage, right down to the last sail tie. ... A versatile sub-70 foot sailboat offering the perfect balance of size and practicality. She can be sailed ...

  10. Guide to Atlantic crossing by sailboat or catamaran

    The classic route to cross the Atlantic by sailboat begins in Europe and ends in the Caribbean or more rarely somewhere else in Central America. A common example of a transatlantic crossing departing from the Canary Islands with a possible stop in Cape Verde and landing in the Antilles. The distance of the crossing from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean is about 2800-3000 nautical miles ...

  11. Crossing The Atlantic By Motor Yacht? Everything You Need To Know

    To cross the Atlantic, you'll need a boat that's at least 30 feet long, whether you're sailing or motoring. For safety and comfort, your boat should be at least 40 feet long. Although the experience of sailing or motoring across the Atlantic is vastly different, both require a boat of this size. If you plan on having a crew on board, you ...

  12. Can A Yacht Make It Across The Atlantic? (Factors To Consider)

    The Atlantic is a notoriously windy ocean and can be treacherous in the winter months. -Make sure you have a good weather forecast and are prepared for rough seas. -Make sure the sails are in good condition, the hull is clean and free of barnacles, and the engine is well-maintained. -Finally, you need to make sure your yacht is in good condition.

  13. Crossing the Atlantic by Motor Yacht Routes

    Conclusion. There are many ways to cross the Atlantic by motor yacht, but there are three main routes that are most popular. The first route is from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean. This route is popular because it offers good weather and sailing conditions. The second route is from the Azores to Bermuda.

  14. The best route for an Atlantic crossing

    A mid-Atlantic trough giving 24-48 hours of light wind is not unusual and can be motored through to keep on schedule. Yet for some crews, the engine is only for emergencies and a more southerly ...

  15. Can Yachts Cross The Pacific & Atlantic Oceans?

    By Morten Storgaard / Boating, Yachts /. Both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans can be crossed in a yacht. You can cross the Pacific and Atlantic oceans on a sailing yacht or a motor yacht. It would be best to have a big enough tank to hold the amount of fuel you expect to burn. This being said, not all yachts are capable of making these trips.

  16. How Far Can Yachts Travel? Helpful Examples (With Numbers)

    A 95-foot yacht with a 9000-liter fuel tank can travel up to 1,200 nautical miles. A 40-foot yacht with a 5,000-liter fuel tank can travel up to 3,000 nautical miles. Think of it this way: the bigger the boat, the bigger the fuel compartment. ... To cross the Atlantic, an average motorized yacht would need a tank with a capacity of about 5000 ...

  17. 15 Top tips for an Atlantic Crossing

    2. Keep it simple. A smart crossing is all about consistent speed, 24 hours a day. The key is not to have downtime. There's no need to fiddle around with twin headsails, Twistlerig or expensive ...

  18. How To Cross the Atlantic, Routes and Timelines

    25 MPH. Airplane. 2010. London - New York. 8 Hours. 478 Knots. 550 MPH. Table comparing time to complete an Atlantic crossing. Looking at this table we can clearly see that the time it takes to cross the Atlantic has decreased exponentially.

  19. What Boat Do You Need For An Ocean Crossing?

    It will take you at least 20 days to cross the Atlantic Ocean, and it could take longer if you choose to sail across the ocean rather than use a motor. ... Underneath its wooden skin, this classic 70-foot 'Gentleman's Yacht' is all high-tech. How to Tie a Boat to a Dock. From Our Boat Database. Atlantis 35. Arksen 30. Aluxa 26. Ganz Boats ...

  20. Ocean crossing with motor-yacht

    That being stated ., a smalish craft , designed and constructed for the job can readily cross oceans. 20ft sail boats have circumnavigated , but of course they didn't need to worry about carring fuel for 2500 to 3000 miles. 35 to 40 ft is considered the bottom size for a couple , with some minimum of comforts. An ocean designed 35 ft power boat ...

  21. how big of a boat does it take to cross the Atlantic?

    Quote: Originally Posted by BoatHooked. A mid-30 foot power boat can cross the Atlantic, if it is the right boat. With that said there is no way *I* would do it an Express Cruiser. The backend is too exposed to the sea for my liking. Caribbean hopping - sure, Atlantic crossing - shudder.

  22. Atlantic crossing: When's the best time to go?

    An Atlantic crossing or Atlantic circuit has often been seen as a year-long adventure, ... While most yachts arrive in the Canary Islands having had a good sail, there are always a number that get ...

  23. Can Superyachts Cross the Ocean?

    Though superyachts are mainly designed for pleasure, they also have the ability to cross oceans. From Hong Kong to Seattle and Melbourne to Tokyo, most superyachtscan sail the seas with relative ease. This is attributed to the strength of the engines and the capability of the vessel to handle potentially rough sea conditions.