capri 18 sailboat review

Catalina Capri 18

With some TLC, a sturdy pocket cruiser becomes the perfect first boat

W hen my husband Richard and I decided to move to rural Door County, Wisconsin, we swore that our time had come at last-we were going to become boat owners. The Door Peninsula has approximately 300 miles of harbor-scalloped shoreline to explore, as well as a tantalizing scattering of islands across its western Green Bay waters and off its rugged northern tip. From our Forestville home, we'd be just a few miles from Green Bay, Sturgeon Bay and Lake Michigan, with a variety of launch ramps and marinas from which to choose. This was a no-brainer. We simply had to have a boat. Our ideal boat would have to be trailerable, giving us access to more distant ports of call when our time off work was limited. It would have to be user-friendly for singlehanded sailing; while we hoped to spend many hours on the water together, neither one of us wanted to forgo a great sail if the other were out of town. And it would have to be stable and solid, a reliable boat on a temperamental lake. As we started our boat search, another criterion reared its head: budget. We didn't have much of one, and this clearly was going to be a problem. It seemed we would never find a boat that could meet all our needs, and we debated worthwhile compromises. Then we discovered a 1986 Catalina Capri 18 named Karma and fell in love at first sight. Catalina Yachts, founded in 1969 by Frank Butler in North Hollywood, California, is one of the world's largest boat manufacturers. The company is recognized for its Fordlike role in bringing sailing to the masses. In fact, in 1995, Butler received a sailing industry leadership award for building boats that are "straightforward, offer price for value (and) are solid and honest." We also knew Catalina had impressive numbers of repeat customers. It clearly was doing something right. In the mid-1980s, Catalina sought to produce a pocket cruiser that would provide the features of a larger yacht in a compact, trailerable and affordable boat. It introduced the Capri 18 in early 1986, and to underscore the effectiveness of the little boat's seaworthy hull and solid performance in both light and heavy wind, singlehanded sailor Shane St. Clair embarked on a 28-day, 2,500-mile voyage from Oxnard, California, to Hawaii aboard his Capri 18 later that year. The message was clear: The Capri 18 may not be the fastest 18-footer out there, but she'll get you there comfortably. We were planning harbor-hopping, sail-camping cruises rather than ocean voyages, but that's what we wanted to hear. The Capri 18's stability comes from its respectable 7-foot, 7-inch beam, relatively hefty 1,500-pound weight and its 425-pound, low-aspect-ratio, internal-ballast lead keel. This keel draws just 2 feet, allowing access to all but the thinnest waters. It also makes launch and haul-out much easier for trailersailors than the word "keelboat" implies. The Capri 18's cruising comfort is built into the details: an extra-long cockpit with 6-foot, 10-inch contoured seats; a forward V-berth and two 7-1/2-foot-long quarterberths that can convert to a single large bunk; large portlights and forward hatch; a complete electrical system, including cabin lights; plenty of storage above and belowdecks, including a molded-in fuel tank locker; a 48-quart portable cooler that doubles as a companionway step and space for a portable toilet under the V-berth. A previous owner added that important optional item for us. While the boat originally came from the factory with a main and jib, we also were pleased to see that a previous owner had added a genoa, spinnaker and small storm jib to Karma's suit. They weren't new sails, but they held their shape reasonably well and would get the job done. The running rigging was in good shape too, and the 6-horsepower Johnson outboard was no crankier than any other 20-year-old Johnson outboard. Our Internet research indicated that other Capri 18s across the country were selling for $2,300 to $7,500, with models available from 1987 through the mid-1990s. (The Capri 18 became the Catalina 18 in 2000.) We felt that Karma's asking price of $3,000 was more than fair, given her good condition, number of amenities and the fact she'd spent her life in fresh water. Research also revealed glowing endorsements. From owners' groups and sailing-related discussion forums, we learned that a singlehander can easily manage stepping the mast, launching the boat and sailing her. We learned that, due to her size and simplicity, hidden maintenance problems are unlikely to rear their ugly heads. One skipper noted she is "well balanced and light on the helm," making her forgiving and kind to less-seasoned sailors. Another observed that the lack of a bulkhead makes belowdecks maneuvering much easier than aboard other pocket cruisers, and still another touted the maximization of storage space and airy feel in the cabin. Karma was just the right boat for us. We brought Karma home late in the sailing season, so we only enjoyed a couple of shakedown cruises before the snow flew: an evening excursion to Little Harbor and a day-trip to Snake Island, where we dropped the hook and went swimming in the late summer sun. All too soon it was time to haul her out and prepare our to-do lists for the following season. We had three lists. The first was the "Hot List," and fortunately this only had two items. Most important was to repair the inner starboard shroud, which was fraying just above the turnbuckle. We took Karma to Great Lakes Yacht Services in Sturgeon Bay, where they fused the new wire the same day-thanks, in part, to my German-born husband's contribution of imported Milka chocolate to the effort. The second item was to replace the trailer tires, which were nearly bald and going flat. Since we weren't planning any hardcore cross-country excursions, Richard went to our local Goodyear Tire Center and purchased two gently used replacements. Our next list was what we affectionately called the "TLC List." We wanted Karma to shine like a new penny, so first we scrubbed her topsides with a mildew stain remover and then her hull with an environmentally friendly hull cleaner. After that, we used a buffing compound to hide the few hull scratches and then, liquid marine wax in hand, took to her with an electric random orbital waxer. We already had sandpaper and varnish thanks to a home-improvement project, so Richard tackled Karma's woodwork-the cabin hatch door, the trim on the sliding cover and the tiller handle-with coarse-grit paper first, medium next and then fine. "I started with sanding down the wood around the entry," he explained. "I used my electric sander for the main areas, a Dremel for the smaller areas and everything else by hand. I sanded the tiller entirely by hand because I didn't want the risk of putting grooves into it or squaring the handle." Once the sanding was done, we applied two coats of varnish. Karma's bottom paint was looking a little rough, so we decided to remove the old paint and apply a new coat. Bottom-painting newbies, we thought a pressure washer might blast off the old coat. "That wasn't so successful," Richard noted wryly, "but it did get the larger pieces off." From there, we carefully removed the rest with a metal scraper and small chisel. Richard used the electric sander and a medium-grit sandpaper to sand down the hull surface, and then we applied two quarts of blue Rust-Oleum Marine Coatings bottom paint. Now we were ready to take on our final list: the "Cruising List." First up was the electrical system. While Karma's running lights seemed to be in working order, the cabin lights weren't functional. So Richard took approximately 50 feet of 14-gauge electrical wire and rewired the cabin. Now we would be able to see down below at night without fumbling with flashlights. Next, in keeping with convenience-at-night theme, he installed an LED light in the cockpit storage locker, located aft to starboard. This small, waterproof utility light emits very little heat, draws little current, is noncorrosive and is shock-resistant, and it's controlled through a switch in the boat's fuse panel. We also installed two chrome floodlights on the top of the mast. Also controlled through a fuse-panel switch, one light is oriented on the foredeck while the other covers the cockpit. In retrospect, these lights were a mistake; in the interest of saving money, we purchased them from Wal-mart. Although they're automotive-grade, they started rusting within weeks. A better addition was the Attwood masthead anchor light, a durable model we purchased through West Marine. This was a must-have if we hoped to do any overnight cruises. Richard ran the wiring down the inside of the mast, tucked within a half-inch PVC tube, and connected it to a fuse-panel switch. Next, we addressed Karma's greatest mystery: the hose to nowhere. After a hard rain, we noticed that the water in the bilge would rise and then sit; it had nowhere to go. A hose ran from the bilge into the starboard cockpit locker but wasn't connected to anything. We purchased a bilge pump with float-switch activation and connected it to the hose. We installed a 3-inch-long, 1-1/2-inch-diameter through-hull fitting-using Liquid Nails as a bedding compound-between the locker and the cockpit, and connected the hose's other end to that. Now, the float switch would activate the bilge pump, and the water would exit the boat via the hose through the locker, to the cockpit's aft end, to the transom drain. This system bypasses the fuse panel entirely and connects directly to the battery. To keep our battery charged, we purchased a Sensei solar battery charger. We can lay this in the cockpit when the sun is shining and pack it away during inclement weather or when we're away. Remembering our afternoon at Snake Island, we also purchased white adhesive nonskid strips and applied them to the Capri 18's little swim platform for an added measure of safety. Although we had hoped to keep our retrofit budget below $600, we decided to splurge and purchase an inflatable Seabo dinghy through our local Sam's Club. The dinghy collapses into its own carry bag for easy onboard storage; it's a great solution for pocket-cruising sailors on the hook or a mooring who wish to go ashore without getting wet. We're already making a new list, of course, as we look toward the 2010 sailing season. Karma's woodwork really should be varnished again. We were too late getting the tarp out in preparation for winter, so this past autumn's leaves did a number on her topsides. The bottom paint needs some touching up, as well. But really, there isn't much. Karma is ready to do what all Capri 18s were designed to do: Get out there.

Project list and cost summary 1986 Catalina Capri 18 $3,000

1. Starboard shroud repair $61.76 2. Gently used trailer tires (2) $40 3. Starbrite Mildew Stain Remover $10.99 4. Starbrite Sea-Safe Hull Cleaner $17.99 5. Chicago Power Tool AC Waxer/Polisher (10") $39.99 6. Scotchgard Marine Liquid Wax (500 ml) $17.99 7. Rust-Oleum Marine Coatings bottom paint (2 quarts, blue) $130 8. LED utility strip light (white) $12.99 9. Chrome floodlights from Wal-mart (2) $35 10. Attwood Anchor/Masthead Light $44.99 11. Rule-A-Matic bilge pump with float switch $39.99 12. Forespar 1-1/2" Threaded Marelon Mushroom Head (3"L) $21.99 13. ICP Global Sunsei Solar Battery Charger (SE-150) $39.99 14. 3M Safety Walk nonskid strips (2" white) $3.99 15. Seabo inflatable dinghy (2.5m) $500 Total retrofit work $1,017.66 (34% of purchase price) Grand Total $4,017.66

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capri 18 sailboat review

CAPRI 18 (CATALINA) Detailed Review

https://images.harbormoor.com/originals/be60be40-fbfe-4bb0-b965-0d6352b0f588

If you are a boat enthusiast looking to get more information on specs, built, make, etc. of different boats, then here is a complete review of CAPRI 18 (CATALINA). Built by Catalina Yachts and designed by Gerry Douglas, the boat was first built in 1985. It has a hull type of Wing Keel and LOA is 5.49. Its sail area/displacement ratio 18.97. Its auxiliary power tank, manufactured by undefined, runs on undefined.

CAPRI 18 (CATALINA) has retained its value as a result of superior building, a solid reputation, and a devoted owner base. Read on to find out more about CAPRI 18 (CATALINA) and decide if it is a fit for your boating needs.

Boat Information

Boat specifications, sail boat calculation, rig and sail specs, contributions, who designed the capri 18 (catalina).

CAPRI 18 (CATALINA) was designed by Gerry Douglas.

Who builds CAPRI 18 (CATALINA)?

CAPRI 18 (CATALINA) is built by Catalina Yachts.

When was CAPRI 18 (CATALINA) first built?

CAPRI 18 (CATALINA) was first built in 1985.

How long is CAPRI 18 (CATALINA)?

CAPRI 18 (CATALINA) is 4.98 m in length.

What is mast height on CAPRI 18 (CATALINA)?

CAPRI 18 (CATALINA) has a mast height of 6.17 m.

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Hunter 212 vs Catalina Capri 18

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Hi all...first post.. I'm a newbie looking to buy my first sailboat. I've narrowed it down to two different choices. I'm looking at a used Hunter 212 and a used Capri 18. They both seem like they would suit my needs. I'm just searching for good things and bad things about both. Anyone here have experience with these boats and could you tell me what I should be looking for in purchasing a used one? e.g. common parts to wear out quick? Also, whats the difference between the MK2 Capri and the non.. What year did they become Mk2.. Thanks for any help.. Mike  

I can't speak to those specific boats, but I've had a Catalina Capri 14.2 foot model for over 15 years and it has been a great little boat. Its draft is a mere 3 inches with the board up and it is only ~350lbs so very easy to work with it. Even has a roller furler for the jib. I've done nothing to it, maintenance wise, in all that time other than clean it once each spring and replace the hiking stick once (I ripped it off when the hiking strap gave way and me and my crew ended up in the drink). It is probably worth about the $1200 I paid for it 15+ years ago. Good luck  

A 14.2 sounds good...just can't seem to find one anywhere near me. I live near Nashville. I wish I could say I was near Seattle. That city is definitely one of the places I would like to visit. I've got my eye on a 1989 Capri 18 at Snug Harbor Boats that seems to be reasonably priced although it doesn't include an engine. Thanks Mike  

I owned a Capri 18, but either boat would be fine, depending on which one appeals to you the most.  

I've found a used Capri 18 that seems to be ok judging from the pictures at Snug Harbor Boats in Georgia. I've been reading reviews on the 212 and it seems to have some problems so I think I will go with the 18. Has anyone ever dealt with Snug Harbor Boats previously? Thanks Mike  

Hunter 212 Catalina Hi, I currently own a Catalina 22 and a Hunter 212. The Catalina is a 1970 boat and the 212 is a 2001. The Catalina 22 is a solid boat and so is the Hunter 212. I read all the reviews I could find on the Hunter and it seamed they had a problem with the tiller. I have not found it to be a problem. I have sailed the Hunter in 15mph wind with gust up to 25 and it was solid as a rock. The cabin space inside the boat is different. The Catalina offers a nice table and sitting area with a bench next to it. The forward V birth has very little clearance and I would want to sleep on the 1/2 births or the table area instead. The Hunter has more room inside the boat and more room in the cockpit. The V birth is comfortable and spacious for a 21' boat. The biggest selling point for me was the open transom on the Hunter. It provides me with a swimming platform and easy access when beached. I have used a 3.5 hp motor and a Mini Kota 55 electric motor for auxilary power. The 3.5 was more power than I needed for either boat, but it has the advantages of reserve power. My Hunter was used by a sailing school before I bought it and they probably had a bunch of newbies on the boats. The tiller held up to all that. The maintenance on the Hunter is much less. I still have both boats but will probably keep the Hunter longer.  

Re: Hunter 212 can a 6 feet tall person fit in the v-berth? This boat is on my short list, started a thread here, you can check it out if you like: edit: can't post links as my post count is less than 10, but my thread is in the boat buying section, easy to find how do you find its sailing in light and heavy winds? I contacted Hunter Cs and they mentionned swing keel is only 130lbs out of the total 1800lbs, which started getting me worried about the boat`s stability, especially singlehanded. i see you've changed the keel back to a swing, any idea how much it weighs? how about the boat total weight? just curious if you've weighted them...Guess I want to make sure this boat has the ability to plane early, and that you`re not always finding yourself cutting down on your sail area to stay stable.  

Hunter 212 Hi, I think you would find the V-berth to be long enough for you. I'm 5'10" and it is good for me. I have only tried it out and not slept over night in it. The V berth gives much more space than my Catalina 22. The keel weight is probably less than 200. I have carried it and moved it around before we got it on the boat. I have never reefed the sails on the boat. I have found it to be a very stable boat and I enjoy the heck out of it. I just added a MinKota 45 electric motor for a kicker and took off the 3.5 hp motor and put that on the Catalina. I think it is best if you can try these boats out before buying them to make sure they are right for you. Of course I bought both my boats without sailing on them first. Rick Rmoynahan yahoo  

Original post was September 2007. This is probably a cold trail.  

I heard from Zemaniak and he is taking delivery of a Hunter 212 on Monday. He found a video I posted on Youtube Kaweah Sailing, and left the message there. Rick  

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Catalina 18

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Re: Catalina 18

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Catalina Capri 18

Catalina Capri 18 is a 18 ′ 0 ″ / 5.5 m monohull sailboat designed by Gerry Douglas and built by Catalina Yachts starting in 1985.

Drawing of Catalina Capri 18

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

In 2000 Catalina Yachts renamed the CAPRI 18 to the CATALINA 18. Photo courtesy Adam Hunt.

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Catalina 18

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Capri 18 catalina

The capri 18 catalina is a 18.0ft fractional sloop designed by frank butler/gerry douglas and built in fiberglass by catalina yachts since 1985..

The Capri 18 catalina is a light sailboat which is a good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a day-boat.

Capri 18 catalina sailboat under sail

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Review of Capri 18

Basic specs..

The Capri 18 is equipped with a fin keel. The fin keel is the most common keel and provides splendid manoeuvrability. The downside is that it has less directional stability than a long keel.But be aware that even though a Wing Keel keel is very good for speed racing, a fishing nets and the like in the water can easily make you into a troublesome situation.

The boat can enter even shallow marinas as the draft is just about 0.71 - 0.81 meter (2.33 - 2.63 ft) dependent on the load. See immersion rate below.

Sailing characteristics

This section covers widely used rules of thumb to describe the sailing characteristics. Please note that even though the calculations are correct, the interpretation of the results might not be valid for extreme boats.

What is Capsize Screening Formula (CSF)?

The capsize screening value for Capri 18 is 2.65, indicating that this boat would not be accepted to participate in ocean races.

What is Theoretical Maximum Hull Speed?

The theoretical maximal speed of a displacement boat of this length is 5.4 knots. The term "Theoretical Maximum Hull Speed" is widely used even though a boat can sail faster. The term shall be interpreted as above the theoretical speed a great additional power is necessary for a small gain in speed.

The immersion rate is defined as the weight required to sink the boat a certain level. The immersion rate for Capri 18 is about 77 kg/cm, alternatively 431 lbs/inch. Meaning: if you load 77 kg cargo on the boat then it will sink 1 cm. Alternatively, if you load 431 lbs cargo on the boat it will sink 1 inch.

Sailing statistics

This section is statistical comparison with similar boats of the same category. The basis of the following statistical computations is our unique database with more than 26,000 different boat types and 350,000 data points.

What is Motion Comfort Ratio (MCR)?

What is L/B (Length Beam Ratio)?

What is a Ballast Ratio?

What is Displacement Length Ratio?

What is SA/D (Sail Area Displacement ratio)?

Maintenance

When buying anti-fouling bottom paint, it's nice to know how much to buy. The surface of the wet bottom is about 11m 2 (118 ft 2 ). Based on this, your favourite maritime shop can tell you the quantity you need.

Are your sails worn out? You might find your next sail here: Sails for Sale

If you need to renew parts of your running rig and is not quite sure of the dimensions, you may find the estimates computed below useful.

This section is reserved boat owner's modifications, improvements, etc. Here you might find (or contribute with) inspiration for your boat.

Do you have changes/improvements you would like to share? Upload a photo and describe what you have done.

We are always looking for new photos. If you can contribute with photos for Capri 18 it would be a great help.

If you have any comments to the review, improvement suggestions, or the like, feel free to contact us . Criticism helps us to improve.

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capri 18 sailboat review

trailer sailing a capri 18

  • Thread starter sailorsteve1
  • Start date Apr 21, 2014
  • Catalina Owner Forums
  • Smaller Boats

sailorsteve1

i wonder if trailer sailing (rigging every time i sail) a capri 18 is feasible or is the rigging too complicated and difficult? im 62 years old 6'5" 205 and in good shape.  

Steve, Looks like I'm your man for your Capri-18 questions. First, do you have the factory mast raising system? The reason I ask is for a reference. The factory mast raising system was easy to use, and just a neat gizmo! We trailed our C-18 the entire time we had her. For part of the time, we dry sailed her out of our yacht club. This was nice because we kept her rigged and on the trailer. We have electric mules at the club to tow the boat over to the crane. My boat already had the 1" stainless steel stub in the keel sump so I had an easy attachment point for my lifting harness. Anyway, I also had the boat set-up for easy rigging. All I disconnected was the forstay. I had a Johnson quick-lever on the backstay, so once I connected the forstay, all I had to do was pull the lever on the Johnson quick-lever and the rigging pulled tight. Very simple and quick. Peolpe were always surprised how quickly we rigged. We had it down to 30 minutes and we're in the water. My wife and I had a routine. The trick is to do it the same way every time. One year at the Havasu Trailer-Sailor convention, we rigged next to another C-18. We were launching before they had their mast raised. I also use velcro straps to hold my rigging to the mast while trailering. Home Depot sells it in 25' or 30' rolls, it's 2" wide and I cut it into 2' lengths. Holds the rigging nicely, is quick to put on and pull off, re-useable, and lasts a long time,(still use it on our C-22). Also my vang and main sheet attached with snap shakles,(my gin-pole for the mast raising system also attached to the boat with a snap shackle). Also we didn't have roller furling. I'm an old school guy, and the C-18 with the "T" fitting for the top attachment of the forstay is not consistant with the recommended installation of a furler. Our boat originally had one and it was the first thing I got rid of after I seen what it did to the forstay. I like the simplicity of a down-haul line, and the rigging is a lot quicker without a furler in my opinion. Don P.S. I'll be 62 later this year, so age isn't an issue, we regularly trailer our C-22, in fact, we'll be pulling her out of the slip Friday morning, de-rig her, trailer her and re-rig and launch before noon the same day.  

watercolors II

De-rigging is the setup for rigging! When I was 62 I could raise the mast on my 22 myself without all the additional rigging attachments and I'm only 5.8 and 170 lbs. There're tricks to everything you just have to figure them out. As Don has explained quick releases and doing exactly the same thing every time is the big time saver. One thing Don didn't tell you is that the de-rigging takes longer than the rigging because of having everything set-up for rigging the next time during the de-rigging and trailering.  

Watercolors! said: When I was 62 I could raise the mast on my 22 myself without all the additional rigging attachments and I'm only 5.8 and 170 lbs. There're tricks to everything you just have to figure them out. As Don has explained quick releases and doing exactly the same thing every time is the big time saver. One thing Don didn't tell you is that the de-rigging takes longer than the rigging because of having everything set-up for rigging the next time during the de-rigging and trailering. Click to expand

sinnettc

Re: stepping the mast Presuming the Cp18 is similar to the Cp22, yeah, you'll probably want to loosen the backstay to raise/lower the mast, then tighten it back up. Don't mess with the forestay once you've got the length set correctly. As far as the shrouds go, I trailer with the lowers disconnected from the fittings by the spreaders, but hook them up before I raise the mast. The uppers don't get disconnected at all. Once the boat is in the slip I set my tensions all around, then check again throughout the season. Technically the uppers & lowers should probably be loosened before lowering the mast, but I've seen posts from other Cp22 sailors who trailer sail and don't mess with loosening them each time. One thing you might find handy if you are going to be adjusting things often, is to make some quick release cotters. Basically cut off cotter pins so they just fit in the turnbuckle, then sew them to a piece of velcro that wraps around the turnbuckle and secures them in place. As far as raising the mast goes, with a tall rig I need some mechanical advantage so I use blocks on the ginpole and stem fitting, and run a line through them and back to the genoa winch to crank it up. I do run the jib/spinnaker halyards to the pulpit and use them to secure the mast while I disconnect the ginpole and hook up the backstay. If I haven't loosened the shrouds I have to use them to pull the masthead forward enough to pin the forestay in place.  

The Capri-18 is simpler to rig than the C-22 because it doesn't have dual lowers like a C-22, and both the upper and lowers attach at the same point. So all you have to remove is the forestay, which is attached with a "T" fitting on the mast, so it's best to just remove it and coil it while trailering. If you install a Johnson Quick-Lever like we did, once the mast is raised and the forestay is pin'ed, pull the lever and the rigging is tensioned and your ready to go. But, the Capri-18 forestay system doesn't like the CDI furler. As the 3rd photo shows, the furler weight and stress twists and bends the forestay and weakens it. After loosing our rigging, I had a new forestay made and dumped the CDI furler and went back to the simplicity of a down-haul. Don  

Attachments

CAPRI 029.jpg

kito said: I loved trailer sailing my C22. Nothing like coming in from a long hot day on the lake and de-rigging in 95 degree heat while the Admiral and I are sweating to death. I especially loved hearing her complaints on the way home on how my trucks ac is not cold enough I had it stored mast up last year which was better but will be in a slip this saturday. I figure I'll get 3x the use from her. Click to expand

tried stepping the mast again today. never got it done. i got frustrated just putting up the extended mast crutch. when i picked up the base of the mast from the pulpit and rolled it aft seems like everything wanted to get caught. it was pretty windy (when i would want to sail) and i was pretty nervous. i did make a ginpole with an attachment point for the jib halyard and i figured on using the boom vang. the ginpole is wood about 6 feet long with a "yoke" at the bottom to fit to the mast. at the top are two eye bolts, one to mount the jib halyard to and the other for the vang to attach to before running it forward to attach to the bow cleat. i got frustrated and gave up again. as much as i sailed last year on my com-pac 16 (which can be rigged and launched in 25 minutes) i cant imagine having to rig the catalina every time. just the thought of it would keep me off the water. guess i should have done more homework before i laid down the dollars.  

Don't give up yet. I just raised the mast on my C22 this weekend and was a snap. Maybe forget about the boom vang as a winch. My gin pole sounds like yours except I installed a small trailer winch to the bottom to do the cranking. I attach the jib halyard to an eye bolt on the top end and run the winch cable through a pulley on the bottom side that connects to the bow. I have a bolt on each side close to the yolk to connect a ratchet strap around the mast to help stabilize. I can hold the mast with my right hand and crank with my left. If things get tangled I can stop and fix.  

kito, i have thought about a winch. do you put your mast in an extended crutch? and when you lower it can you control it with the winch handle? thanks for the input. steve b  

i will do that thanks  

i have heard a lot of talk about baby stays, but no one says how long they need to be or where to connect them on the mast. i would just as soon not add to the things i have to rig to step the mast. do you use them in conjunction with the gin pole and winch?  

I don't feel a need for them. But I wouldn't raise the mast in a high cross wind situation either. My upper and aft lower shrouds stay connected. I only remove the forestay and forward lowers. Once the mast reaches about 70 degrees, the lower and upper shrouds begin to have enough tension to help center.  

CurtCarver1

im gonna get a two way ratcheting winch and mount it on the ginpole and give it a try. thanks steve b  

i took the cdi furler off the boat (happily the catalina forstay was in good shape). this should make stepping the mast much easier (thanks don), as i was worried about hanging on to the furler while raising plus it should be considerably less weight. im gonna try it tomorrow without the ginpole and see how it is. failing that i will finish my ginpole and then try again. i didnt buy this thing to let it sit in the garage. thanks fellas for the advice and encouragement  

Captain Capri KLR

I bought the Capri to trailer sail. The most frustrating thing for me is trying to connect the front stay. My connector has a pin with a wire ring which has to pass through it. I do not know if there is a nautical name for the connection, I am new to this site. Is there a quicker connection which would still be safe to hold the mast up?  

Of all the things I do to make rigging and de-rigging easier and quicker, the one thing I don't do is try and be quick and easy with securing the forestay. I don't like the hollow push-button pins due to the strength issue, it's hollow, and yes I know I'm probably nuts, but I still believe in a straight clevis pin and a round keeper ring. I also put a stainless steel washer under the head of the clevis pin and behind the keeper-ring. Don  

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Capri 22 Sailboat Review

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The Capri 22 Sailboat Review is finally in and the answer is a good one. A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to go sailing for a couple of days on my friend’s Capri 22. I loved every minute of it. Besides the fact that we happened to go out on one of the most perfect sailing days (wind and weather-wise), the day was pretty close to perfect.

Here’s what I liked about it:

  • Cushioned Seats
  • Fits 6-8 People
  • Fast on the Water
  • Heels Like a Champ
  • Stantions and Railings are at A Good Height and Feel Sturdy
  • Easily Maneuverable

Things I didn’t like As Much

  • Cabin is Smaller
  • The placement of Certain Lines Can be Difficult To Set Up At Times

It’s a good compromise between a “Cruiser” and all out racer. I’d place it closer to the day-sailor side. The Capri 22 is great trailering. It’s light enough so that towing this boat doesn’t feel like a burden. The deck is very spacious and can fit 6-8 people. One thing to note: If you’re looking for a boat that is more for pleasure cruises and will have more above and below deck amenities, this wouldn’t be my first choice . You’d probably want to look at a Catalina 22 or something similar. The Capri 22 is closer to a racing boat. It is still spacious enough for 8 people, you’ll find a smaller cabin and a few less amenities on board.

The boat I was on, was a 2002 model, so still fairly new, in nautical boating terms. Overall, I had a great day with a good friend, lots of sun, wind and good times on the Capri 22. Maybe I’ll just buy one for myself! ~Terry

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Terry Judd has been an avid sailor for the past 40 years. Growing up in San Diego, he grew up on the water, yet still learns something new every time he ventures out. As Co-Owner of Get Wet Sailing, he's dedicated to bringing you useful information that sailors and adventures alike would want.

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COMMENTS

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    May 1, 2014. #6. The Capri-18 is simpler to rig than the C-22 because it doesn't have dual lowers like a C-22, and both the upper and lowers attach at the same point. So all you have to remove is the forestay, which is attached with a "T" fitting on the mast, so it's best to just remove it and coil it while trailering.

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