Bientôt sur le site A l’image de la « Carte de l’Océan » dressée par un grand cartographe français du 18 ième  siècle et représentant les routes des navigateurs autour du monde sur la carte papier, la cartographie numérique du Jules Verne offrira la possibilité de dérouler et comparer les différents records successifs autour du monde réalisés suivant le règlement du « Trohée Jules Verne » . Mais le point remarquable de cette cartographie sera de pouvoir suivre tout nouveau défi, le comparer en temps réel par rapport aux records précédents tout en respectant les contraintes imposées par le défi en cours.

Cet outil se voudra simple d’utilisation mais moderne et doté de fonctionnalités permettant de voyager autour du monde. Nous espérons vous voir très nombreux et prendre beaucoup de plaisir.

René Boulaire

cartographie-proto

“At the edge of the Antarctic, we’ll glide around the world. We’ll go surfing in those places where, since Cook, few have ventured, crossing the seasons from west to east, leaving from Ushant and then back again, passing through the Capes of Good Hope, Leeuwin and Horn. We’ll count down the days, we’ll hurtle down the slopes, we’ll swallow up the meridians. The voyage will last just eighty days, just enough time for a small tour.” Florence Arthaud

© Photo Christian Février

One challenge after another

The enthusiasm of sailors – and above all, their sponsors – was not piqued until Titouan Lamazou’s highly publicized 1990 victory in the Vendée Globe, designed as the ultimate race to open the decade. Titouan, winner of the competition’s first edition, sailed solo around the world, without assistance or stopovers, in 109 days, 8 minutes and 48 minutes. “The way I see it, winning a supreme victory is not an end in itself,” the champion told the newspaper Libération. “One challenge will replace another; the eighty-day challenge was waiting for us behind the port’s jetty.” Also in 1990, Florence Arthaud became the first woman to win a singlehanded ocean race, the fourth edition of the Route du Rhum.

The two sailing stars of the year came up with the idea of founding a new challenge that would perpetuate the tradition of major round-the-world ocean races. They wanted the Jules Verne Trophy to follow in the footsteps of the Golden Globe Challenge inspired by Sir Francis Chichester in 1968; the BOC Challenge, created in 1982 by Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, winner of the Golden Globe; and the Vendée Globe Challenge, launched by Philippe Jeantot, winner of the two first editions of the BOC. The two French sailors also bore in mind the first crewed ocean race to circumnavigate the globe:  the Whitbread, whose saga began in 1972, and which would seal the legends of navigators including Peter Blake, Robin Knox-Johnston and Éric Tabarly. On 29 January 1991, Florence and Titouan created the “Tour du Monde en 80 Jours,” a non-profit association that would support the Jules Verne Trophy. In this way, they promised to bring to life Yves Le Cornec’s wonderful idea, and above all, to make it endure beyond a single exploit under the eighty-day mark.

In an era when most race regulations placed limits on vessel size, the promoters of the Jules Verne Trophy imagined a competition open to any yacht, with no restrictions on boat or crew size. It was thought at that time that the available racing boats were not powerful enough to match Phileas Fogg’s record.

Titouan Lamazou soon put all his efforts into creating a gigantic monohull capable of meeting the challenge. He readily saw himself as an heir to Rudyard Kipling’s Captain Courageous, at the helm of cod-fishing schooners that would crisscross the Grand Banks of Newfoundland in the 19th century until the dawn of the 20th century. His Tag Heuer, 44 meters long, would be the descendant of the Bluenose – also 44 meters – a mythical Canadian schooner that, for years, dominated the Fisherman’s Trophy invented by Sir Thomas Lipton for this type of boat, and that marked the golden age of Western “working” sailing. While Titouan fine-tuned the new Bluenose, Florence Arthaud endeavored to obtain, from her sponsor Pierre Premier, financing for a forty-meter catamaran.

trimaran william saurin

The eighty-day challenge was also a challenge for designers who came up with prototypes. “The Jules Verne Trophy offers new free rein to the genius of architects and builders, and will be a pretext – for many years to come I hope – for firing up the imaginations of skippers,” declared Titouan when he, along with Florence and others, laid the foundations of the new challenge.

A rendezvous with sailors

To draw up the simplest possible regulations, Titouan and Florence met up with experienced navigators, lovers of freedom who were driven by dreams resembling their own. They frequently gathered at the houseboat of Dany and Yvon Fauconnier. Moored on one edge of the Seine, on the banks of the Île de la Jatte, this was a meeting spot for sailors in Paris. Also with them were the ever-loyal Jean-François Coste , Yves Le Cornec, Eugène Riguidel, Jean-Yves Terlain, but also, for this purpose, Philippe Monet and the Peyron brothers.

trimaran william saurin

The Jules Verne Trophy was placed under the High Patronage of the French Ministry of Culture. It was created following a call for tenders financed by the ministry, won by US artist Tom Shannon. The original sculpture remains the property of the French State and is conserved in the Paris Marine Museum. The Trophy would be presented to the skipper who beat the circumnavigation speed record in under 80 days. And its holder would in turn hand it over to whoever bettered his or her record.

Verne, Blake and Knox-Johnston (3) (3) Sir Peter Blake and Sir Robin Knox-Johnston on the doorstep of the Yacht Club de France. The Sir Peter Blake Trust Collection / Alan Sefton.

Florence and Titouan headed to Portsmouth to present the “Jules Verne” to Peter Blake. The winner of the Whitbread dreamed of a new challenge to fill out one of the most prestigious prize lists in the world of sailing. “For those tempted by adventure, it’s becoming more and more difficult to be first. There aren’t many more mountains left to climb; very few challenges remain that deserve being called records, and that can bring us personal satisfaction,” regretted the New Zealander skipper. The Jules Verne Trophy could however – he was convinced – “drive his adrenalin levels back up.” “What makes this challenge so attractive is that it is possibly possible,” added his sailing companion Robin Knox-Johnston. The holder of the first non-stop, single-handed circumnavigation record (Golden Globe Challenge, 1968) was also a believer. “Mix technology in with the harsh reality of the Forties and the challenge becomes irresistible,” he continued with enthusiasm. “If we succeed, it will be the triumph of ingenuity and the human spirit.” For Florence and Titouan, the support of these ocean-racing giants gave their challenge international legitimacy as of its launch.

The day on which the departure line was officially opened, Peter and Robin came to Paris. The solemn announcement was made, on 20 October 1992, in the lounge of the Yacht Club of France, in the 16th arrondissement. Three French ministers were present: Jack Lang, Minister of Culture, Charles Josselin, Minister of the Sea, and Frédérique Bredin, Minister of Sport. The Tour du Monde en 80 Jours association summoned the top sailors. Bernard Moitessier honored them with his presence; he hadn’t seen Robin Knox-Johnston since 1968 when both had been at the starting line of the Golden Globe Challenge…

trimaran william saurin

Florence Arthaud and Titouan Lamazou informed the press that they were not ready to set sail. Titouan’s prototype would only touch the waves two months later. And Florence had no boat. It was at that moment that Peter Blake and Robin Knox-Johnston chose to announce their upcoming departure. The skippers from New Zealand and Britain had recently acquired the catamaran Formule Tag that they would adapt to take up Phileas Fogg’s challenge. Bruno Peyron was not in Paris that evening, but he had already made it known that he would also be setting off at the start of 1993.

The spirit of the Trophy

It was the elder of the Peyron brothers who would be the first to set the circumnavigation speed record, finishing up in 79 days, in April 1993 . Ever since, under the auspices of Jules Verne, skippers have continued to shorten the time needed to sail around the world. 74 days, then 71, 64, 63, 50, 48, and 45 days in 2012… These navigators, whose names are engraved on the base of the Jules Verne Trophy, are Bruno Peyron, three times, Peter Blake, Robin Knox-Johnston , Olivier de Kersauson twice, Franck Cammas and Loïck Peyron . Others have challenged them and will continue to do so.

The catamaran dreamed up by Florence Arthaud never saw the light of day. Titouan’s schooner sank before crossing the starting line. The two founders pursued other dreams. Florence left us too early. But a quarter of a century after the début of their joint adventure, Titouan is left with the satisfaction of knowing that the spirit of “their” Trophy remains intact. “The Jules Verne Trophy remains a reference, a prestigious emblem that honors skippers and their sponsors, and that has never swayed from this principle,” rejoices the sailor-painter. Yves Le Cornec, the inventor of the 80-day sailing venture, also observes: “The Trophy hasn’t been hijacked. It’s stayed free of all commercial connotations and remains simple, strong and universal.”

Of course, in the space of 25 years, things have changed. Although the itinerary is the same, with Spindrift and Idec Sport sailing at over 30 knots around the globe in 2015, we’ve come a long way since the pioneering Commodore Explorer won at an average of 14.39 knots. The spirit of adventure, however, stays unshaken. “I’d like to ask them, when they come back, how they saw the world…,” adds Yves Le Cornec. For that’s what it’s all about in the end: running to see the world.

ProBoat.com

Professional BoatBuilder Magazine

Obituary: derek kelsall.

By Dieter Loibner , May 31, 2023

trimaran william saurin

Derek Kelsall in the cockpit of Toria sails with his wife, Clare, at the helm.

The sailing world has lost a pioneering multihull designer and boat-builder. Derek Kelsall, who famously introduced Eric Tabarly to multihulls, and who was one of the first to champion foam sandwich construction, died at 89 last December in Thames, New Zealand.

Born in rural North Wales on May 15, 1933, the son of a farm laborer and a schoolmistress, Kelsall spent his early childhood in humble surroundings. Later he studied engineering at Bristol University but was unable to finish the course for lack of funds. He entered the oil exploration business, working in Libya and Texas, but soon traded his desk job for sailing and building multihulls in the Caribbean. In a spur-of-the-moment decision, he entered the second edition of the Observer Singlehanded Transatlantic Race (OSTAR) in 1964, racing Folatre, a 35′ (10.7m) plywood Arthur Piver–designed trimaran.

The boat was ketch rigged and equipped with an early wind vane self-steering system, but there was much concern surrounding Folatre and her young skipper, as she was the first multihull to enter the race without ballast (two other catamarans in the race had been fitted with twin ballast keels). Sadly, five days into the race while lying in second place, Folatre struck an underwater object, destroying her rudder. Kelsall returned to Plymouth, fixed the rudder, restarted, and finished in Newport, Rhode Island, in the then-respectable time of 34 days. [With a otal elapsed time of 61 days, he officially finished 13th—Ed.]

He decided to produce his own trimaran design—the 45′ (13.7m) Toria, named after his newly born daughter. Toria was one of the most influential multihulls ever, establishing the fundamental concept of modern racing trimarans subsequently adopted by ORMA (Ocean Racing Multihull Association) 60s, Ultimes, and Ocean Fifties. Toria had twin akas connecting the relatively high-volume, fine-bowed amas to the main hull, their geometry such that at rest only one ama ever touched the water. Significantly, she was the first boat built in the U.K. using foam sandwich construction, with Airex foam as the core material.

trimaran william saurin

Toria, built in foam sandwich and with high-volume amas, was ahead of her time and defined the genre of offshore racing trimarans in the 1960s.

Aboard Toria, Kelsall and Martin Minter-Kemp competed in the Royal Western Yacht Club’s first doublehanded Round Britain and Ireland Yacht Race in 1966, comfortably winning and thus posting the first-ever multihull victory in a major offshore race. This success created considerable interest in offshore trimarans, including from famous French skipper Eric Tabarly, who two years earlier had won the OSTAR on Pen Duick II, a 44′ (13.4m) monohull. Tabarly helped Kelsall deliver Toria from Cornwall to London, where it was displayed at the 1967 London Boat Show. Impressed, Tabarly returned to France to work on his first trimaran with French naval architect André Allègre and builder Chantiers de la Perrière.

The 68′ (20.7m) Pen Duick IV was a groundbreaking trimaran design, fitted with a ketch rig on twin rotating wing masts. But compared to what Kelsall built at this time in foam sandwich, her aluminum construction and tubular crossbeams appeared quite conservative. Tabarly was unable to defend his title in the 1968 OSTAR when the autopilot failed after a collision.

Derek Kelsall Built Winners

As the builder of the 57′ (17.4m) monohull Sir Thomas Lipton—the winning yacht in that race, designed by Robert Clark and sailed by Geoffrey Williams—Kelsall shared in her success. It was ironic that a multihull proponent like Kelsall would build a monohull to win the OSTAR, which saw a rising tide of multihull entries. The top multihull finisher was the super-spartan 40′ (12.2m) proa Cheers, designed by Dick Newick, built on St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, and skippered by American Tom Follett.

Kelsall continued to enjoy success into the 1980s with his small trimaran designs, including Trifle, built for Royal Yacht Squadron Commodore Major-General Ralph Farrant; and the 44′ trimaran Trumpeter, which finished third in the gale-ridden 1970 Round Britain and Ireland with American Phil Weld at the helm.

His greatest series of raceboats were the various Three Legs of Mann trimarans built and sailed by Isle of Man–based Nick Keig. The most successful of these was the 53′ (16.2m) Three Legs of Mann III, which Keig raced to second place in the 1980 OSTAR; however the most innovative was VSD, a hybrid cattrimaran with a flying center pod, a concept subsequently adopted by catamarans like the D35s and Alinghi 5.

After Sir Thomas Lipton’s 1968 OSTAR victory, Kelsall used his skills in foam-sandwich construction to build the Alan Gurney–designed Great Britain II for Chay Blyth, at 78′ (23.8m) LOA the largest composite boat ever at the time of her launching in 1973. In the first Whitbread Round the World Race in 1973–74 she was the scratch boat, took line honors, set the elapsed time record at 144 d 10 h [correcting out to 6th place overall—Ed.], and went on to compete in five further editions of that contest.

trimaran william saurin

Kelsall with his partner, Paula Hesterman, in New Zealand.

Subsequently, Kelsall designed and built two large trimarans for Chay Blyth: the 80′ (24.4m) Great Britain III, and the 53′ Great Britain IV, which won the 1978 doublehanded Round Britain and Ireland Yacht Race. Spearheaded by the likes of Eric Tabarly and Alain Colas, large racing multihulls became popular in France during the 1980s, but Kelsall never rose to prominence there, even though Eugène Riguidel and Gilles Gahinet won the double-handed 1979 Transat Lorient– Kelsall with his partner, Paula Les Bermudes–Lorient on Hesterman, in New Zealand. VSD, passing Tabarly and Marc Pajot aboard Paul Ricard before the finish. Kelsall also designed the giant William Saurin for Riguidel, at 93′ (28.3m) LOA the world’s largest trimaran when she was launched in 1982.

From the mid-1980s Kelsall’s work as a yacht designer focused on cruising catamarans and the Kelsall Swiftsure Sandwich technique (KSS), in which flat panels are laid up on a table to speed construction. He first used KSS in 1973 and kept improving the process over subsequent decades, building everything from small day boats to giant passenger ferries, catamarans such as the Space 55, Suncat 40, Islander 39, and larger one-offs.

After Kelsall’s first wife, Clare, succumbed to Parkinson’s disease, he continued to build boats, and with new partner Paula Hesterman made his home in Waihi, just north of Tauranga, New Zealand.

-James Boyd

[A version of this obituary appears on YachtsandYachting .com. —Ed.]

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Nachruf : Derek Kelsall – der Pionier der Mehrrumpfboote

Johannes Erdmann

 ·  02.01.2023

Nachruf: Derek Kelsall – der Pionier der Mehrrumpfboote

England hat viele gute Segler, Bootsbauer und Konstrukteure hervorgebracht. Derek Kelsall hingegen wurde im Jahr 1933 als Sohn eines Farmarbeiters geboren und wuchs zunächst in einfachsten Verhältnissen und fernab des Segelsports auf. Sein Studium in Maschinenbau konnte er nicht abschließen, weil ihm vorher das Geld ausging. Er wechselte ins Ölbusiness, arbeitete eine Zeit lang für BP in Kenia, bevor es ihn nach Texas verschlug. Dort in den USA und vor allem an der Westküste war der Bau von Mehrrümpfern deutlich populärer als in Europa. Die YACHT porträtierte im Jahr 1967 in einer ganzen Serie die vier wichtigsten Konstrukteure Kaliforniens (Dr. Hugo Myers, Ralph Flood, Norman A. Cross, Rudy Choy). Es war die Blütezeit des Mehrrumpfbootbaus – und in dieser Zeit muss Derek Kelsall den Entschluss gefasst haben, von der Ölbranche in ein Tätigkeitsfeld zu wechseln, das ihn schon immer interessiert hatte: den Bau und die Konstruktion von Mehrrumpfbooten.

Der Kelsall-Trimaran "FT" von David Palmer bei Testfahrten vor Ramsgate

Im Jahr 1964 meldete sich Kelsall zum zweiten Observer Singlehanded Transatlantic Race (OSTAR) an und bestellte kurzerhand einen 35 Fuß langen Arthur Piver Trimaran, den er “Folatre” nannte. Zwei Monate nach der Bestellung des Bootes führte er das Regattafeld bereits aus dem Hafen von Plymouth und segelte fünf Tage lang weit vorn mit, direkt hinter Eric Tabarly, bis ihn eine Kollision mit einem treibenden Gegenstand jedoch zur Aufgabe und Rückkehr zwang. Nach der Reparatur des Bootes setzte Kelsall erneut in Plymouth die Segel und erreichte Newport in Rhode Island problemlos nach 34 Tagen auf See.

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trimaran william saurin

Sein Piver-Trimaran war ein ungewöhnliches Boot im OSTAR, völlig aus Sperrholz gebaut, als Ketsch geriggt und mit einer Wind-Selbststeueranlage ausgestattet. Zudem war “Folatre” der erste Mehrrumpfer, der ohne jeglichen Ballast an den Start ging, damals ungewöhnlich. Im selben Rennen waren zwei Katamarane am Start, die über Ballastkiele verfügten.

Die “Toria” setzte Maßstäbe

Während seiner Einhand-Atlantiküberquerung sammelte Kelsall viele Erfahrungen, die er später in die Konstruktion seiner eigenen Trimarane einfließen lassen sollte. Bereits im Jahr 1966 ging der 45-Fuß-Trimaran “Toria” zu Wasser, den Kelsall selbst konstruiert hatte und nach seiner Tochter benannte. Das Schiff setzte Maßstäbe für den Bau von Renntrimaranen, die bis heute Bestand haben. Zudem war “Toria” das erste Boot, das mit der neuen, von Kelsall entwickelten Technologie gefertigt wurde: Mit einem Kern aus Airex-Schaum konnte der Rumpf stabil, aber federleicht gebaut werden. Kelsall benannte die Technologie nach dem Ort, in dem seine Werft lag: dem kleinen Ort “Sandwich” in der Grafschaft Kent.

“Toria” gewann spielend das Zweihand-Rennen Round Britain and Ireland im Jahr 1966, und Kelsalls Erfolgsgeschichte begann. Im folgenden Jahr führte Kelsall die französische Segellegende Eric Tabarly auf einer Überführung von “Toria” ins Trimaransegeln ein. Doch statt Kelsall den Auftrag für einen neuen Tri zu geben, ließ der seinen Landsmann André Allègre einen 68-Fuß-Trimaran (“Pen Duick IV”) aus Aluminium zeichnen, der jedoch viel zu schwer war und zu allem Überfluss während des OSTAR-Rennens 1968 bei einer Kollision beschädigt wurde. Doch Kelsall hatte keinen Grund zur Trauer um den verlorenen Auftrag, denn stattdessen bekam er die Aufgabe, den 57-Fuß-Einrumpfer “Sir Thomas Lipton” für Geoffrey Williams zu bauen. In Sandwich. Aus Sandwich. Das Boot gewann das Rennen mit 17 Stunden Vorsprung.

Der Kelsall-Katamaran “KatManDu” vom Typ Tango 52 Performance

Nach vielen weiteren Regattabooten und -erfolgen begann Derek Kelsall ab Anfang der 80er Jahre vorwiegend schnelle Fahrtenkatamarane zu konstruieren, die sich nach dem KSS-System (Kelsall Swiftsure Sandwich) auch von Bootsbau-Amateuren selbst fertigen ließen. Er entwickelte eine Unterdruck-Technik, die es selbst Eigenbauern ermöglichte, mit einfachsten Mitteln steife und leichte Rümpfe zu fertigen.

“Derek Kelsall hat mir den Einstieg in den modernen Bootsbau ermöglicht”, sagt Burkhard Bader. Seit 1985 ist er hierzulande DER Ansprechpartner, wenn es um den Bau eines Kelsall-Katamarans ging. “Ich habe bis 2006 über 100 Baupläne von ihm an deutsche Selbstbauer vermittelt und etwa 35 Neubauten in meinen Werkstätten gebaut und betreut.”

Viele Kelsall-Boote sind heute noch auf dem Wasser

Fast alle Boote segeln heute noch. “Wie etwa die ‘Matangi’ von Paul Maier”, sagt Bader. Er war der Erste, mit dem Bader im Jahr 1985 zusammenarbeitete. “Er hat seine Tonga 40 mit und bei mir in Kiel gebaut, sie dann im Dezember als Kasko auf eigenen Kielen an die Mosel überführt, um den Innenausbau zu machen.” Anschließend ist Maier mit seiner Familie jahrelang um die Welt gesegelt und nach vielen Jahren in der Heimat nun gerade wieder auf Weltumsegelung. “Sein Boot ist inzwischen 37 Jahre alt und sogar 2022 von Deutschland über Grönland in die Südsee gesegelt, meist einhand.”

Der 80 Fuß lange Kelsall-Trimaran “William Saurin” nahm 1982 an der Route du Rhum teil

Laut Bader liegt der Erfolg der Kelsall-Schiffe nicht zuletzt an den verständlichen Bauplänen. “Obwohl er Engländer war, nutzte Kelsall das metrische System”, sagt er. Auch die leichte Bauweise galt damals als revolutionär: “Die Vakuumverklebung war eine Idee Derek Kelsalls”, sagt Bader, “im deutschen Bootsbau kannte damals noch niemand die Technik.” Mangels professioneller Systeme genügten dem Bootsbauer jahrelang mehrere Staubsauger als Werkzeug zur Erzeugung des Vakuums. “Genauer: des Unterdrucks”, präzisiert Bader, “denn ein vollständiges Vakuum wird nicht erreicht. Später nutzte ich eine Weidemelkpumpe, das funktionierte auch.”

Mitte der 90er Jahre wanderte Derek Kelsall nach Neuseeland aus und fand dort seine neue Heimat, in der er bis zum Ende seines Lebens weiter an Booten zeichnete.

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MULTIHULL MATCH Building a prototype of a cruising catamaran: sandwich or wood/epoxy composite?

Avatar de Philippe Echelle

Article published on 01/08/2014

By Philippe Echelle

published in n°137 sept. / oct.

MW137

Multihull Mag Match is an open forum, a place where those in the multihull business can express their opinions. For this duel, we asked Derek Kelsall and Alain Borsotti to give us their views on the best way to build a catamaran. Wood/epoxy composite, or sandwich? We'll leave you to judge...

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For a wood/epoxy composite.

Alain Borsotti cut his teeth at the Méridienne shipyard, under Denis Kergomard, before going on to build the Etincelle 60' in Brazil (J. Fioleau), before finally settling in Sète where he created Rives Sud. Not just a multihull specialist but also a talented restorer and builder (Fleury Michon IV, Pat's) Alain is at home with all types of composites, but admits to a soft spot for wood/epoxy "Over the last 25 years, building with wooden composites has been evolving continuously. When I built my first catamaran (a Philippe Harlé Punch 1000) it was like a two-footed Muscadet, with a plywood body sealed with resin, only laminated under the waterline and sealed using fillets. It is still sailing, in perfect condition, in the Caribbean. One other method was that of molded wood, a magical (yet very long!) way to build contoured multihulls which are light and very resistant. It took me four years to rebuild Fleury Michon 4, a 45' trimaran designed by Dick Newick! It's hard to justify this method these days because of the cost, which is a shame because it is the ultimate method. The sheer range of different wood composite techniques means that it is possible to optimize the weight, mechanical constraints and all the demands relating to comfort and aesthetics, as long as the right material is used in the right place. The sail trawler RS57 which is currently under construction, is using the three main techniques that are employed today. Strip planking, direct descendant of the molded wood method, is ideal for making the bottom of the hull. It is made up of strips of red cedar (a rotproof wood, in 20-30mm strips) stuck together and then covered with a biaxial fiberglass cloth impregnated with epoxy resin. This means that longitudinal tautness and shock resistance are guaranteed. The plywood comes into play for the bulkheads and planking. Digital cutting means that time can be saved and that there is a level of precision that would have been unthinkable even fifteen years ago. Each individual element arrives pre-cut, according to the design, thanks to computer software which can be connected to a digital, industrial cutting machine. All of these elements are then pieced together on the floor like a giant puzzle. Using aligning pins and scarf joints allows for an optimum fixing of all the individual elements. Other elements are then added to the base of the hull, (transversals, bulkheads and other reinforcements) before everything is lined up using a laser. It required three people working for two weeks to line up the frame of the RS57. Before, the external sides of the planking were stratified under vacuum on marble, thus reducing the amount of finishing and sanding down needed. The interior is then impregnated with three coats of epoxy resin, meaning that even over a long time, humidity cannot penetrate.

Multihulls Match: wood/epoxy composite or sandwich

For the bridge and the deckhouse, we think that the well-known technique derived from the sandwich is the most appropriate. For the RS57, we did the following: for the outer layer a sheet of fiberglass. The middle layer was a PVC mousse, and the inside layer was plywood. The plywood used as an interior facing, can be lacquered without too much tedious sanding and rendering work. The PVC foam ensures excellent thermic insulation, and the external stratification rounds off the general solidity of the build. 20 or 30 years ago, the assembling of all the different elements was done using only screws and fillets. It was sometimes their Achilles heel, allowing water seepage, as well as a certain structural weakness. These days, all the parts of a modern multihull are stratified using strips of cloth, which is usually biaxial. From the main partitions to the transversals and to the lowest levels, every part contributes to the overall structure. The result is there for all to see: a lightweight chassis with exceptional stiffness. By adding small quantities of carbon fiber at strategic points (mast bulkhead, beams, appendages) we can improve technical performance still further. The progress in wood composite techniques over the last 30 years, coupled with all the different ways that they can be used, means that they represent an interesting alternative to other materials that are currently in use. The main criticisms that were made against wood a few decades ago have now been laid to rest. External maintenance has been made easier through the systematic use of cloth and epoxy resin as an outer coating on the whole of the boat. By using this system, the boat is well protected from humidity, and apart from a fresh coat of paint every 10 years, the upkeep is no more intensive than for any other material. The upkeep of the interior on the other hand, is much simpler: no vinyl liners, no patched-up units, but a uniform and smooth structure which makes for ease of cleaning and any renovation down the line. We are able to produce light yet resistant boats today thanks to this combination of materials such as biaxial fiberglass, carbon fiber, waterproof epoxy resin and relatively thin plywoods, which all come together to ensure an overall robustness. On top of all this, it is one of the most ecological materials used in nautical construction, as the proportion of wood used far exceeds that of oil-based products, meaning that the carbon footprint is much lower. Just one more argument which goes to show that wood composite is still today an important material in the world of boat construction."

Multihulls Match: wood/epoxy composite or sandwich

For The Sandwich

Derek Kelsall is a multihull pioneer. Co-inventor of the sandwich process, he is also the designer of the famous THREE LEGS OF MANN for Nick Keig and of the first giant trimaran : WILLIAM SAURIN for Eugène Riguidel. INTRODUCTION. "I enjoyed working with wood. Adding resin at every step was less pleasant. For say, a canoe, strip timber can look amazing. However, if seeking efficiency in build time, cost and least weight, without compromising performance and taking the view that style should follow function, there is one technique which stands head and shoulders above any other. KSS foam sandwich. PVC foam as a core between thin fiberglass skins is uniquely versatile. There is almost no limit to the ideas that can be applied. Ply is ply. Strip is strip, but the ways in which sheets of foam can be used is only limited by the imagination. I liken it to a computer program where there are regular updates.

Multihulls Match: wood/epoxy composite or sandwich

WHY SANDWICH. When I built my first trimaran in Texas, we used some rather poor plywood which was then covered by this wonderful material called fiberglass. Why, I asked is the fiberglass used only as a sheathing, when it looks so strong and durable. While knowing nothing about boat design or boat building at that time, I was enough of an engineer to realize that the prime requirement of most parts of a boat is panel stiffness and that some form of sandwich gives best stiffness. A sandwich structure consists of a lightweight core with thin, dense skins on each side. This is the equivalent of the “I” beam. The core resists relative movement between the skins. In this context, the stiffness is proportional to the square of the thickness. Double the core thickness and you have four times the stiffness but are adding only a relatively small amount of extra weight.

THE MATERIALS. In 1965, I found the right materials in UK. It was during the time that fiberglass moulding was becoming popular so glass and resin were available. A company called BTR industries produced Pasticell, which is cross linked PVC foam, but had not previously been used for boats. Polyester resin was the most prevalent at the time and the one that I was familiar with. Today we often specify vinylester resin. The traditional shaping is still applied today for the all compound curvature shapes applicable to most mono designs. Applying the outside skin, finishing the outside and then turning to apply the inside skin are tasks which are not particularly pleasant to do. Of course this applies to all alternatives except KSS. This approach gives a good structure, with the all important bond between core and skin assured by applying wet resin direct to the foam core. Most builders look for a fine finish. This means applying layers of filler and sanding each layer. Both are skilled jobs. The skins of many multis are only one or two mm thick. I have found filler up to ten or twelve mm thick . The filler can easily double the skin weight. In 1973, the table changed everything. The quality, the time, the atmosphere in the workshop and the enthusiasm of the boat builders all improved dramatically. As we were making full size panels, which could be bent to a gentle curve, fair lines where guaranteed. As we worked but also designed, I was always on the look out for ways of moving any part off the boat onto the table. Eventually the time came when every part of the structure started life on the table. Vacuum was used to ensure the bond between the skin and the core. Heat could be applied both above and below the table to ensure a quality resin cure. KSS (Kelsall Swiftsure Sandwich) is the term, suggested by our first owner build client, that we adopted in 1990. Clients quickly took to KSS. No other technique could produce fair, lightweight hulls in the 3-4 days which our clients and our team did regularly.

Multihulls Match: wood/epoxy composite or sandwich

THE VERSATILITY OF FOAM. Foam as a core has some remarkable properties. I liken it to an extremely lightweight timber, where there is no grain direction. In some applications we utilize the elasticity of the foam to assist in shaping.

OTHER TASKS ON THE MOULD TABLE. We quickly realized that there are lots of tasks which can be done on the table while making the panels, particularly edge treatment. A batten laid at the edge of the panel, for instance, produced the deck edge radius. This all important curve is guaranteed to give a fair deck edge provided it looks fair on the table. Other tasks done on the table include preparation for bolting, capping of openings, bringing both skins together, recesses for joining, windows and hatches. The stiffness of panels can be adjusted to eliminate the need for internal or external stiffeners. The stresses on hulls vary along the length of the hull and similarly for other parts. Both the foam thickness and the scanglings can vary to suit, saving weight and cost. Resin infusion became open technology 14 years ago. While it requires considerable experience and skill to apply in moulds, it is straightforward on the table and learned in a few days of test panels and smaller panels. The advantages are excellent laminating results, a clean workshop and the ability to produce the full sandwich in one shot. Previously, the second skin was done as a separate operation. I will mention that we do have what we call a non-resin infusion panel making method, which is applicable to smaller boats or for single panels. SUMMARY - KSS for- Least weight. Least build time. Best laminates Fair lines. Cleanest workshop. Least onerous finishing. Modular assembly. Most durable - 45 yo Kelsalls are passing structural survey with flying colors. Easy to repair. It is the most satisfying way to build. The only down side; KSS cannot be applied to the all-compound curve style which is popular with some designers, though it is always possible to combine the original foam technique with work on the KSS table.

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Derek Kelsall, l’architecte naval qui a inventé le trimaran moderne

11 janvier 2023

trimaran william saurin

Le monde de la course au large a perdu un de ses pionniers. L’architecte Derek Kelsall s’en est allé à 89 ans le 11 décembre 2022. Il restera comme l’homme qui a conçu le premier trimaran de course moderne et qui a développé la construction en sandwich. Retour sur l’histoire et le parcours d’un défricheur de la course au large.

Des origines rurales.

Originaire d’une famille modeste, Derek Kelsall est né le 15 mai 1933 au pays de Galles. Son père, ouvrier agricole, et sa mère, institutrice, lui inculquent des valeurs traditionnelles. Étudiant, il intègre l’université de Bristol, mais ne parvient pas à aller au bout de son cursus par manque de finances.

Dans le cadre de son service militaire, il est déployé une année entière au Kenya. À son retour, il se lance dans l’industrie du pétrole en se faisant embaucher par BP.

Après ce début de carrière dans les pays du golfe Persique, il est envoyé sur une exploitation au Texas.

Une transat en course avec son premier multicoque

Derek et sa femme Clare

C’est à cette période, dans la mer des Caraïbes, que Derek s’initie à la construction et la manœuvre de multicoques. Disposant pour la première fois de sa vie d’un pécule lui permettant de devenir skipper, il construit un  trimaran  en  contreplaqué  de 35 pieds qu’il baptise  Folâtre . Dessiné par Arthur Piver, ce  trimaran  est gréé en  ketch  et n’est pas équipé de lest, ce qui était pourtant la  norme  à l’époque.

Le trimaran Folâtre

Puis sur un coup de tête, et soutenu par sa jeune épouse Clare, Derek s’inscrit à la 2 e  édition de la  Transat Anglaise  en 1964 et prend le départ de la célèbre  transatlantique  entre Plymouth et Newport. Il se retrouve aux côtés de concurrents comme Francis Chichester et Éric Tabarly, qui le mentionne dans ses mémoires comme un  »  séduisant ingénieur, dont le trimaran peut créer la surprise au portant par la route des alizées « .

Derek prenant la pose peu avant le départ de la Transat Anglaise 64

À la faveur de conditions avantageuses, Folâtre prend un bon départ, mais brise son safran après cinq jours de course. Après avoir réparé à Plymouth, Kelsall reprend la mer et boucle le trajet en 34 jours, alors que Tabarly a passé la ligne d’arrivée en vainqueur après 40 jours de mer.

Le pionnier du  trimaran  océanique

Toria

Convaincu du bien-fondé et du potentiel d’un multicoque sur une course océanique, Kelsall met à profit sa  formation  d’ingénieur et conçoit  Toria , un  trimaran  de 45 pieds. Visionnaire, Derek apporte à son multicoque pléthore d’innovations qui vont inspirer la course au large pendant plusieurs décennies.

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Construit en sandwich sur une base de mousse Airex, Toria possède de longs flotteurs volumineux, reliés à la coque centrale par deux bras parallèles. Sa surface mouillée est réduite, car il navigue sur deux coques quand il est sous voile. Le microcosme des coureurs océaniques est sceptique au lancement de  Toria , le monocoque étant encore préféré dans la culture européenne.

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Tabarly est convié par Derek à naviguer sur  Toria  lors d’un  convoyage  au sud de l’Angleterre. A son retour en France, Tabarly est stupéfait par les performances du  trimaran  anglais et se lance dans la conception de  Pen Duick  4. Mais pour des raisons de culture et de coût, il se tourne vers l’architecte français André Allègre pour dessiner ce  trimaran  en  aluminium  d’une longueur de 68 pieds. Kelsall regrettera longtemps de ne pas avoir été sollicité pour ce projet novateur.

La technologie de construction en sandwich-mousse, développée par Kelsall, intéresse Sir Thomas Lipton, qui le sollicite pour la construction d’un monocoque de 60 pieds pour s’aligner au départ de l’Ostar en 1968. En raison de plusieurs avaries, Derek finira à la 5 e  place de cette édition, qui a été remportée par Sir Thomas Lipton. Tabarly et son  Pen Duick  4, victime d’une collision avec un cargo, devront rebrousser chemin.

1970-1980 : l’essor du  trimaran  de course

Three Leggs of Mann

Au début des années 70, Derek rencontre de nouveaux succès dans la conception de  trimaran , avec les lancements de  Toria Triffle ,  Three Legs of Mann  et  Trumpeter  qui brillent sur les régates anglo-saxonnes. En 1973, il construit pour Chay Blyth le  Great Britain 2 , qui est le plus grand bateau en composite de son époque.

Dans les années 80, tous les coureurs océaniques se tournent vers le  trimaran . Les projets affluent dans cette course à l’ innovation , majoritairement trustés par les  skippers  bretons.

Trimaran VSD (© Jean-Luc Garnier / Revue Bateaux)

Face à la mainmise des « froggies », Kelsall dessine un  trimaran  de 52 pieds,  VSD , avec lequel Eugène Riguidel et Gilles Gahinet ont remporté la  Transat en double  Lorient-Les Bermudes-Lorient en 1979, devant  Marc Pajot  et … Éric Tabarly.

William Saurin lors de son lancement

Fort de ce succès, Riguidel maintient sa confiance dans l’architecte anglais en lui commandant un  trimaran  géant de 93 pieds,  William Saurin,  qui est le plus grand  trimaran  du monde à son lancement.

Une carrière dans la plaisance

Par la suite, Derek Kelsall a délaissé le microcosme de la course au large pour se concentrer sur la conception de bateaux de plaisance. Il conçoit de nombreux  yachts  et multicoques de croisière.

Le Kelsall 46

Il développe une technique de  construction navale , le KSS pour Kelsall Swiftsure Sandwich, qui consiste à découper des panneaux plans en composite au lieu de les mettre en forme, améliorant ainsi la productivité des chantiers. Cette technique, qui a été utilisée pour la construction de petits ferries ou de  yachts  de croisière, ainsi que des productions de série comme le Space 55, le Suncat 40 et l’Islander 39 et des modèles plus grands tels que le 70 pieds My Way.

Le Kelsall 70

Une retraite active chez les kiwis

Après le décès de sa femme Clare, Derek se rend en Nouvelle-Zélande dans les années 90 afin de suivre la construction d’un  catamaran  de 72 pieds. Tombant amoureux du pays, il décide de s’y installer et d’y continuer son activité de concepteur naval. Il y donnera ses derniers coups de crayon avant de disparaître à 89 ans le 11 décembre 2022.

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The Unique Burial of a Child of Early Scythian Time at the Cemetery of Saryg-Bulun (Tuva)

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Pages:  379-406

In 1988, the Tuvan Archaeological Expedition (led by M. E. Kilunovskaya and V. A. Semenov) discovered a unique burial of the early Iron Age at Saryg-Bulun in Central Tuva. There are two burial mounds of the Aldy-Bel culture dated by 7th century BC. Within the barrows, which adjoined one another, forming a figure-of-eight, there were discovered 7 burials, from which a representative collection of artifacts was recovered. Burial 5 was the most unique, it was found in a coffin made of a larch trunk, with a tightly closed lid. Due to the preservative properties of larch and lack of air access, the coffin contained a well-preserved mummy of a child with an accompanying set of grave goods. The interred individual retained the skin on his face and had a leather headdress painted with red pigment and a coat, sewn from jerboa fur. The coat was belted with a leather belt with bronze ornaments and buckles. Besides that, a leather quiver with arrows with the shafts decorated with painted ornaments, fully preserved battle pick and a bow were buried in the coffin. Unexpectedly, the full-genomic analysis, showed that the individual was female. This fact opens a new aspect in the study of the social history of the Scythian society and perhaps brings us back to the myth of the Amazons, discussed by Herodotus. Of course, this discovery is unique in its preservation for the Scythian culture of Tuva and requires careful study and conservation.

Keywords: Tuva, Early Iron Age, early Scythian period, Aldy-Bel culture, barrow, burial in the coffin, mummy, full genome sequencing, aDNA

Information about authors: Marina Kilunovskaya (Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation). Candidate of Historical Sciences. Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Dvortsovaya Emb., 18, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation E-mail: [email protected] Vladimir Semenov (Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation). Candidate of Historical Sciences. Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Dvortsovaya Emb., 18, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation E-mail: [email protected] Varvara Busova  (Moscow, Russian Federation).  (Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation). Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences.  Dvortsovaya Emb., 18, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected] Kharis Mustafin  (Moscow, Russian Federation). Candidate of Technical Sciences. Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.  Institutsky Lane, 9, Dolgoprudny, 141701, Moscow Oblast, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected] Irina Alborova  (Moscow, Russian Federation). Candidate of Biological Sciences. Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.  Institutsky Lane, 9, Dolgoprudny, 141701, Moscow Oblast, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected] Alina Matzvai  (Moscow, Russian Federation). Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.  Institutsky Lane, 9, Dolgoprudny, 141701, Moscow Oblast, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected]

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J'ai navigué sur Banque Populaire V : Le plus grand de tous

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Article publié le 07/05/2009

Par Jean-Christophe Guillaumin

n°Archives déc. / janv.

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Out of the Centre

Savvino-storozhevsky monastery and museum.

Savvino-Storozhevsky Monastery and Museum

Zvenigorod's most famous sight is the Savvino-Storozhevsky Monastery, which was founded in 1398 by the monk Savva from the Troitse-Sergieva Lavra, at the invitation and with the support of Prince Yury Dmitrievich of Zvenigorod. Savva was later canonised as St Sabbas (Savva) of Storozhev. The monastery late flourished under the reign of Tsar Alexis, who chose the monastery as his family church and often went on pilgrimage there and made lots of donations to it. Most of the monastery’s buildings date from this time. The monastery is heavily fortified with thick walls and six towers, the most impressive of which is the Krasny Tower which also serves as the eastern entrance. The monastery was closed in 1918 and only reopened in 1995. In 1998 Patriarch Alexius II took part in a service to return the relics of St Sabbas to the monastery. Today the monastery has the status of a stauropegic monastery, which is second in status to a lavra. In addition to being a working monastery, it also holds the Zvenigorod Historical, Architectural and Art Museum.

Belfry and Neighbouring Churches

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Located near the main entrance is the monastery's belfry which is perhaps the calling card of the monastery due to its uniqueness. It was built in the 1650s and the St Sergius of Radonezh’s Church was opened on the middle tier in the mid-17th century, although it was originally dedicated to the Trinity. The belfry's 35-tonne Great Bladgovestny Bell fell in 1941 and was only restored and returned in 2003. Attached to the belfry is a large refectory and the Transfiguration Church, both of which were built on the orders of Tsar Alexis in the 1650s.  

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To the left of the belfry is another, smaller, refectory which is attached to the Trinity Gate-Church, which was also constructed in the 1650s on the orders of Tsar Alexis who made it his own family church. The church is elaborately decorated with colourful trims and underneath the archway is a beautiful 19th century fresco.

Nativity of Virgin Mary Cathedral

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The Nativity of Virgin Mary Cathedral is the oldest building in the monastery and among the oldest buildings in the Moscow Region. It was built between 1404 and 1405 during the lifetime of St Sabbas and using the funds of Prince Yury of Zvenigorod. The white-stone cathedral is a standard four-pillar design with a single golden dome. After the death of St Sabbas he was interred in the cathedral and a new altar dedicated to him was added.

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Under the reign of Tsar Alexis the cathedral was decorated with frescoes by Stepan Ryazanets, some of which remain today. Tsar Alexis also presented the cathedral with a five-tier iconostasis, the top row of icons have been preserved.

Tsaritsa's Chambers

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The Nativity of Virgin Mary Cathedral is located between the Tsaritsa's Chambers of the left and the Palace of Tsar Alexis on the right. The Tsaritsa's Chambers were built in the mid-17th century for the wife of Tsar Alexey - Tsaritsa Maria Ilinichna Miloskavskaya. The design of the building is influenced by the ancient Russian architectural style. Is prettier than the Tsar's chambers opposite, being red in colour with elaborately decorated window frames and entrance.

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At present the Tsaritsa's Chambers houses the Zvenigorod Historical, Architectural and Art Museum. Among its displays is an accurate recreation of the interior of a noble lady's chambers including furniture, decorations and a decorated tiled oven, and an exhibition on the history of Zvenigorod and the monastery.

Palace of Tsar Alexis

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The Palace of Tsar Alexis was built in the 1650s and is now one of the best surviving examples of non-religious architecture of that era. It was built especially for Tsar Alexis who often visited the monastery on religious pilgrimages. Its most striking feature is its pretty row of nine chimney spouts which resemble towers.

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  1. William Saurin (trimaran)

    William Saurin was an 80-foot (24 m) waterline length trimaran that was sailed across the Atlantic Ocean in 1984. See also. List of multihulls; References This page was last edited on 28 April 2024, at 14:40 (UTC). Text is available under the Creative Commons ...

  2. William Saurin

    Trimaran géant William Saurin Eugène Riguidel. Histoire et palmarès : A la fin des années 1970, Eugène Riguidel (Une vidéo à droite ou il joue le reporter pour la télé lors de l'arrivée de Gérard d'Aboville lors de sa traversée de l'Atlantique à la rames), est tout en haut de l'affiche après le tour de Grande Bretagne et la victoire dans la Transat en Double avec Gilles Gahinet ...

  3. Derek Kelsall, Multihull design pioneer, passes away

    Derek continued with Riguidel designing for him what was effectively a predecessor to the present day 'Ultime' class in the giant William Saurin. At 93ft LOA, she was the world's largest trimaran when she was launched in 1982 but was unable to defend her title, Riguidel and Jean-Francois Le Mennec finishing second in the 1983 edition to ...

  4. Genesis

    On board the William Saurin trimaran under Riguidel, they had covered 3,000 miles at around 13 knots - an average speed that at that time had never been reached when crossing the Atlantic. "While talking and imagining circumnavigations of the globe at this speed, the idea of 80 days suddenly stood out as obvious to me," recalls Yves le ...

  5. William Saurin (trimaran)

    William Saurin was an 80-foot (24 m) waterline length trimaran that was sailed across the Atlantic ocean in 1984.[1]See alsoList of multihullsReferences^ C. A. Marchaj (2003) [1996]. Sail Performance. Camden, Maine: International Marine/McGraw Hill. p. 4..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:

  6. Obituary: Derek Kelsall

    Kelsall also designed the giant William Saurin for Riguidel, at 93′ (28.3m) LOA the world's largest trimaran when she was launched in 1982. From the mid-1980s Kelsall's work as a yacht designer focused on cruising catamarans and the Kelsall Swiftsure Sandwich technique (KSS), in which flat panels are laid up on a table to speed construction.

  7. William Saurin

    For the trimaran sailboat, see William Saurin (trimaran). William Saurin (1757 - 11 February 1839) was an Irish barrister and politician. He was Attorney-General for Ireland from 1807 to 1822, and for much of that period he acted as the effective head of the Irish administration. He was unusual in an Irish Law Officer in that he never became ...

  8. Nachruf: Derek Kelsall

    Foto: YACHT-Archiv/Jonathan Eastland/AJAX NEWS PHOTO Der 80 Fuß lange Kelsall-Trimaran "William Saurin" nahm 1982 an der Route du Rhum teil. Laut Bader liegt der Erfolg der Kelsall-Schiffe nicht zuletzt an den verständlichen Bauplänen. "Obwohl er Engländer war, nutzte Kelsall das metrische System", sagt er. ...

  9. William saurin Photos Stock & Des Images

    RIGUIDEL EST SKIPPER DU TRIMARAN WILLIAM SAURIN TANDIS QUE KNOX JOHNSTON NAVIGUE SON NOUVEAU CATAMARAN OLYMPUS III (EX SEA FALCON). PHOTO:JONATHAN EASTLAND/AJAX REF:821007 20A059. Confirmation de téléchargement. Veuillez remplir le formulaire ci-dessous. Les informations fournies seront incluses dans votre confirmation de téléchargement

  10. Document sans titre

    Histoire des Multis: Sommaire - Numéros - Liste Alphabétique - Architectes. K9, William Saurin, 32 à jour au: 2011 1982 plan Kelsall.Trimaran de 27,10 x 15m x 10t, SV: 345m2, construit en sandwich par Barberet Rennes, 1981 Décembre"Bateaux", "Nouveaux Multis pour 82", pour Eugéne RIGUIDEL 1982 27 juillet, mise à l'eau du bateau à Brest

  11. MULTIHULL MATCH Building a prototype of a cruising catamaran: sandwich

    Derek Kelsall is a multihull pioneer. Co-inventor of the sandwich process, he is also the designer of the famous THREE LEGS OF MANN for Nick Keig and of the first giant trimaran : WILLIAM SAURIN for Eugène Riguidel. INTRODUCTION. "I enjoyed working with wood. Adding resin at every step was less pleasant. For say, a canoe, strip timber can look ...

  12. Derek Kelsall, l'architecte naval qui a inventé le trimaran moderne

    William Saurin lors de son lancement. Fort de ce succès, Riguidel maintient sa confiance dans l'architecte anglais en lui commandant un trimaran géant de 93 pieds, William Saurin, qui est le plus grand trimaran du monde à son lancement. Une carrière dans la plaisance

  13. Construction du trimaran "William Saurin" d'Eugène Riguidel aux

    Construction du trimaran "William Saurin" d'Eugène Riguidel aux chantiers Barberet de Rennes en juillet 1982. On enduit de résine les toiles de kevlar de la coque. Obtenez des photos d'actualité haute résolution de qualité sur Getty Images

  14. William Saurin

    William Saurin (1757 - 11 February 1839) was an Irish barrister, Crown official and politician.He was Attorney-General for Ireland from 1807 to 1822, and for much of that period, he acted as the effective head of the Irish Government. He was unusual among Irish Law Officers in that he was never appointed a judge, nor wished to become one. As an Ulster Protestant, and a determined opponent of ...

  15. UltimBoat

    L'actualité des Ultimes, Ultim' 32X23, des MOD70, des Multi70, trimarans, catamaran, foilers, les courses, les chantiers et leurs skippers. De l'information en temps réel, rien que de l'info.

  16. Category:Trimarans

    Pages in category "Trimarans" The following 85 pages are in this category, out of 85 total. ... Wētā Trimaran; William Saurin (trimaran) WindRider 10; WindRider 16; WindRider 17 This page was last edited on 23 May 2015, at 13:59 (UTC). Text is available under the Creative ...

  17. Multihull design pioneer Derek Kelsall passes away

    Derek continued with Riguidel designing for him what was effectively a predecessor to the present day 'Ultime' class in the giant William Saurin. At 93ft LOA, she was the world's largest trimaran when she was launched in 1982 but was unable to defend her title, Riguidel and Jean-Francois Le Mennec finishing second in the 1983 edition to the ...

  18. The Unique Burial of a Child of Early Scythian Time at the Cemetery of

    Burial 5 was the most unique, it was found in a coffin made of a larch trunk, with a tightly closed lid. Due to the preservative properties of larch and lack of air access, the coffin contained a well-preserved mummy of a child with an accompanying set of grave goods. The interred individual retained the skin on his face and had a leather ...

  19. J'ai navigué sur Banque Populaire V : Le plus grand de tous

    Dans la famille des plus grands trimarans de course du moment, il y eût William Saurin (c'est si vieux…), puis Poulain, devenu Sport Elec, rebaptisé Idec 1. Ensuite, Geronimo est arrivé, avec ses 32 mètres, puis plus tard Groupama 3. Mais ces deux là semblent bien petits au vu des 40 mètres de long et les 47 m de haut de Banque ...

  20. Savvino-Storozhevsky Monastery and Museum

    Zvenigorod's most famous sight is the Savvino-Storozhevsky Monastery, which was founded in 1398 by the monk Savva from the Troitse-Sergieva Lavra, at the invitation and with the support of Prince Yury Dmitrievich of Zvenigorod. Savva was later canonised as St Sabbas (Savva) of Storozhev. The monastery late flourished under the reign of Tsar ...

  21. Machine-Building Plant (Elemash)

    In 1954, Elemash began to produce fuel assemblies, including for the first nuclear power plant in the world, located in Obninsk. In 1959, the facility produced the fuel for the Soviet Union's first icebreaker. Its fuel assembly production became serial in 1965 and automated in 1982. 1. Today, Elemash is one of the largest TVEL nuclear fuel ...

  22. Elektrostal

    Elektrostal , lit: Electric and Сталь , lit: Steel) is a city in Moscow Oblast, Russia, located 58 kilometers east of Moscow. Population: 155,196 ; 146,294 ...