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Phillips Sails have earned a reputation for quality yacht and sailboat rigging services over the past 56 years, largely due to the expertise of Bryan Phillips himself. As the owner/operator, Bryan assumes an active role and has a wealth of experience behind him.

Bryan's experience is your gain. Philips Sails offer only the most reliable products available on the market today including Furlex furlers, Selden hardware, Liros and FSE dyneema ropes, along with the full range of Harken and Ronstan fittings – that's piece of mind for you.

Apart from servicing local rigging needs in the Lake Macquarie region, Bryan travels as far afield as Coffs Harbour and Port Macquarie on the Mid-North Coast, Nelson Bay and the wider Port Stephens locality, along with Newcastle and the Hunter Region.

As any yacht owner will know, the benefits of maintaining the standing rigging should not be overlooked, it's a sensible investment. Phillips Sails is widely regarded as the rigging authority on Lake Macquarie and surrounds, so Bryan can comfortably manage all your standing rigging needs, no matter how big or small.

Carbon fibre masts and spars are the pick for those searching for supreme performance and exceptional longevity. Phillips Sails are the only recognised rigging team in the region to offer professional rigging services specifically for carbon spars. Of course, we're more than competent with traditional alloy spars too!

So whether you need standing or running rigging, a new furler or deck hardware, a custom canopy or a boom cover, get in touch with Bryan at Phillips Sails ... tap into his experience, you can't go wrong!

Bryan Phillips

0404 844 511

Bridgeport Boatworks

Rigging, Masts, & Sails

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Make it stand out

At Bridgeport Boatworks, in Connecticut, we offer our clients a range of sail related services, including sail repairs, recuts, cleaning, storage, inspections and more.

Our team of professional sailmakers are highly trained to help you get optimal usage from your sails. Plus, we have the industry knowledge and experience to not only address your sails’ immediate concerns, but also look out for any signs (e.g. wear spots) indicating future complications and act on them before they escalate, saving you time and money in the process.

We can handle sails from the smallest boats right up to 700 kilo superyacht sails and fabrics from traditional cotton sails for classic yachts to carbon/Kevlar racing sails.

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MerManMarine at Bridgeport Boatworks

RigMaxx provides all the rigging services you will need for your vessel. Splicing, winch services, specialized line, rig tuning, and winterization. We are dedicated to making sure your yacht will be finely tuned.

We do custom splicing, winch services, rig tuning and service, off-site servicing, hydraulics, deck layout and hardware service, and customized whisker pole solutions.

Services Available

As well as repairing sails, we clean them to eradicate dirt, algae, staining and mildew before coating them with top quality sail protection products. Our results are always outstanding, so it’s no wonder we keep our clients and build long-lasting relationships with the sailing community.

When it comes to transporting your rigging, we are more than equipped to ensure the mast and spars are adequately protected throughout the entire transportation process. With the addition of our recently debuted 700-MT Travelift, we always have the capacity to ensure your vessel is given the space required to keep its components safe.

Evaluations

We offer our clients the opportunity to have their sails and rigging regularly inspected and be informed of any actions needed to bring them up to industry standards. Because of the safety elements involved, only trained professionals should carry out rigging inspections to ensure they are done correctly.

We also offer our clients a professional rig tuning service, where we conduct a thorough check, ensuring all elements are in the correct position and the mast is in position to facilitate optimal sailing performance. In our experience, tuning the rigging can result in considerable performance improvements for your vessel. So, it’s always best to leave this to the experts – that’s us!

The team at Bridgeport Boatworks are always happy to answer your questions regarding rigging, masts and sails. If you would like more information about our services or would like to request a quote, don’t hesitate to contact us.

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Forums > Sailing > > General

Rigger lake macquarie.

MattM14

NSW, 186 posts

Thumbs Up

NSW, 1478 posts

Phillips Sails do rigging as well as sails. Very easy to deal with. www.phillipssails.com.au/rigging.php

UncleBob

NSW, 1213 posts

Kankama

NSW, 644 posts

What are you trying to do with the mast? If you are moderately handy you may be able to do all the work yourself. Personally I don't like to call Patrick down to the boat because it costs a heap of money. I go up my own rig, measure the stays, rig a tight halyard, drop one of each (apart from a forestay) and take them to him and Bob (who Patrick worked for) would swage them up. Cost about half price that way. A seized sheave will be a bit of a bugger to remove but a hammer, kerosene, oil and a drift should do it. As well as saving money, I think it is safer to know as much about your boat as possible and how it is put together. If you are going to drop the mast I would recommend you go over the whole thing, and not just the masthead sheave. Run new wiring if needed, install a better LED nav/anchor light, check the VHF coax and aerial, spreader bases, and all tangs. Masts are nice jobs because they don't take too much time. I haven't dropped mine for about 19 years. Even though all is pretty good, it would be nice to pull it out and have a really nice look over the whole thing. I would like a new tang for a slutter attachment too.

Select to expand quote Kankama said.. What are you trying to do with the mast? If you are moderately handy you may be able to do all the work yourself. Personally I don't like to call Patrick down to the boat because it costs a heap of money. I go up my own rig, measure the stays, rig a tight halyard, drop one of each (apart from a forestay) and take them to him and Bob (who Patrick worked for) would swage them up. Cost about half price that way. A seized sheave will be a bit of a bugger to remove but a hammer, kerosene, oil and a drift should do it. As well as saving money, I think it is safer to know as much about your boat as possible and how it is put together. If you are going to drop the mast I would recommend you go over the whole thing, and not just the masthead sheave. Run new wiring if needed, install a better LED nav/anchor light, check the VHF coax and aerial, spreader bases, and all tangs. Masts are nice jobs because they don't take too much time. I haven't dropped mine for about 19 years. Even though all is pretty good, it would be nice to pull it out and have a really nice look over the whole thing. I would like a new tang for a slutter attachment too. Thanks Kankama, I have been up the mast a couple of times now to try and figure out what the issue is but haven't had much luck. I am using the opportunity to replace all the lights (and associated wiring) along with installing a masthead VHF antenna and replacing the Windex (found the old one on the deck one day). So the opportunity will not be wasted. I gave up on waiting for Patrick calling me back and found an alternative. Hopefully all will be happening in about 3 weeks.

PacificStar

PacificStar

NSW, 53 posts

"rigger lake macquarie" started by mattm14, send message.

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Bay Sailing Centre

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

The Bay Sailing Centre venue has a 40-year history of hosting local dinghy sailing as well as delivering major world, national and state championships.

Situated on the shores of Salamander Bay, it faces east towards the majestic Port Stephens headlands and a body of water that is widely regarded as offering one of the best sailboat racing tracks in Australia.

Fluctuating tidal conditions provide a degree of challenge, yet race officers have myriad opportunities to set fair courses for all wind directions and distances – include passage races.

A long stretch of white sandy beach and two grassy reserves either side of the clubhouse provide ample rigging and launching opportunities for dinghies, skiffs, catamarans and sailboards alike. In addition, there is a public wharf and concrete boat ramp 100 metres to the north of the site.

Trailer sailers and sports boats can also launch at nearby Soldiers Point boat ramp and overnight at the adjoining Soldiers Point Marina, gaining shelter from the prevailing summer nor’easters.

As part of a new chapter, Newcastle Cruising Yacht Club (NCYC) has attained the licence to run the community club, renaming it the Bay Sailing Centre to signify the change. It is bringing a higher degree of professional staffing and resourcing to the sailing and sail training operations, while enhancing community access.

The ultimate vision is to create a facility that showcases and enhances the sport’s presence, with anticipated flow-on benefits for local and regional recognition, participation and visitation.

The Bay Sailing Centre conducts point-score racing throughout the summer season and also offers a raft of sail training opportunities for junior sailors keen to try the sport.

Our renowned Sailing Academy and on-water race management team has expanded to this Centre, bringing O’Pen Skiffs and Tacker dinghies.

The upper floor of the facility is the perfect place to watch the sailing activities or enjoy a post-race get-together, either inside or on the veranda. It has a café serving barista-made coffee and snacks, while also being available for catered functions.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us for more information via the following –

Newcastle Cruising Yacht Club Membership Enquiry
(02) 4940 8188
Bay Sailing Centre Cafe Enquiry
(02) 4919 1015
Functions Enquiry Kaylee Menzies

(02) 4919 1015

Situated right in the heart of Newcastle's lively yachting scene, East Coast Marine & Sail is the place to head for all your sailmaking and chandlery needs.

As the sole agent for North Sails in Newcastle, you are assured of the same expert knowledge and advice characteristic of the North Sails brand the world over. Sailmaking is not the only reason to visit East Coast Marine & Sail, our chandlery is stocked full of the best sailing clothing and yachting equipment on the market.

So if you're in need of sails, fittings, rope or clothing, we invite you to come in and check out the range at the most comprehensive sailing shop in town, East Coast Marine & Sail...

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  • Boat Rigging: Setting Sail for Success

In the world of sailing, boat rigging plays a crucial role in ensuring the safety, efficiency, and performance of your vessel. From standing rigging to sail rigging types, it's essential to understand the intricacies of rigging a yacht to embark on smooth sailing adventures. In this comprehensive guide, we'll dive into the nuances of boat rigging, helping you navigate the open waters with confidence.

Boat Rigging Basics

Before we delve into the details, let's start with the fundamentals of boat rigging. Understanding the key components and their functions is essential for any sailor, whether you're a novice or a seasoned pro.

Standing Rigging

Standing rigging refers to the fixed support structure of a boat's mast, including wires, cables, and rods. It plays a critical role in maintaining the mast's vertical position and overall stability.

Sail Rigging Types

Sail rigging is not a one-size-fits-all concept, but rather a diverse world with various types and configurations to suit different sailing needs. Understanding these rigging types is essential for any sailor looking to optimize their boat's performance and safety. 

Ship Riggings

Ship riggings have played a pivotal role in shaping the history of seafaring and maritime exploration. These complex systems of ropes, wires, and sails have been integral to the functionality and success of various vessels throughout the ages.Explore the significance of ship riggings, their evolution, and their influence on modern-day boat rigging.

Close-up shot of blue and white rope used in boat rigging

Read more useful sailing tips:

Don’t panic: handling maritime emergencies, explore tuscan archipelago in one week, skippered boats: how to pack for a yachting holiday, boat rental with skipper: everyone can go to sea, skippered boats: myths about sailing, sail from lefkada for 14 days. where to, what not to miss when visiting lefkada, skippered boats: step-by-step boat rental, where and why to sail from lefkas marina, materials matter.

The choice of materials for your boat rigging is a decision that can't be taken lightly. Two popular options, Dyneema and Kevlar, offer distinct advantages.

Dyneema Rigging

Dyneema rigging represents a breakthrough in the world of sailboat rigging. This cutting-edge material, known for its remarkable strength and low stretch properties, has revolutionized the way sailors experience the open water. Often referred to as the ultimate innovation in the world of sailing, Dyneema rigging offers a myriad of advantages: 

  • Exceptional Strength: Dyneema rigging boasts remarkable strength-to-weight ratio, making it incredibly robust and reliable even in demanding conditions. 
  • Low Stretch: Dyneema has minimal stretch, which translates to improved sail control and responsiveness, ensuring better performance.
  • Lightweight: It's significantly lighter than traditional rigging materials like steel, reducing the overall weight of your vessel and enhancing speed and maneuverability.
  • Low Maintenance: Dyneema rigging requires minimal maintenance, offering sailors peace of mind and more time on the water.
  • Resistance to Corrosion: Unlike metal rigging, Dyneema is not susceptible to corrosion, ensuring a longer lifespan and durability.
  • UV Resistance: Dyneema is highly resistant to UV rays, making it ideal for prolonged exposure to sunlight.
  • Easy Handling: Its flexibility and ease of handling simplify rigging installation and adjustments.
  • Enhanced Safety: Dyneema's strength and reliability contribute to safer sailing experiences, reducing the risk of rigging failure.
  • Versatility: It's suitable for a wide range of applications, from standing rigging to halyards, making it a versatile choice for sailors.
  • Eco-Friendly: Dyneema is an environmentally friendly option as it doesn't release harmful substances into the water, contributing to a cleaner marine ecosystem.

Dyneema vs. Kevlar

Weigh the pros and cons of Dyneema and Kevlar to determine which suits your sailing needs best:

Dyneema Rigging:

  • Exceptional Strength: Dyneema boasts impressive strength, making it highly reliable for rigging purposes.
  • Low Stretch: It has minimal stretch, enhancing sail control and overall performance.
  • Lightweight: Dyneema is significantly lighter than traditional materials, reducing the vessel's weight.
  • Low Maintenance: Requires minimal upkeep, saving time and effort.
  • Corrosion Resistance: Dyneema is not susceptible to corrosion, ensuring durability.
  • UV Resistance: It's highly resistant to UV rays, making it suitable for extended exposure to sunlight.
  • Safety: Dyneema's strength and reliability contribute to safer sailing experiences.
  • Versatility: Suitable for various rigging applications, from standing rigging to halyards.
  • Cost: Dyneema can be more expensive than some traditional materials, initially.
  • Abrasion Resistance: It may be less resistant to abrasion compared to Kevlar.

Kevlar Rigging:

  • Excellent Abrasion Resistance: Kevlar is highly resistant to wear and tear, ensuring longevity.
  • High Tensile Strength: It offers impressive tensile strength, making it suitable for demanding applications.
  • Stiffness: Kevlar is stiffer than Dyneema, which can be advantageous for some rigging configurations.
  • Heavy: Kevlar is heavier than Dyneema, potentially impacting vessel performance.
  • Low UV Resistance: It is less resistant to UV radiation, which can affect its durability over time.
  • Higher Stretch: Kevlar tends to stretch more than Dyneema, which can impact sail control.
  • Prone to Corrosion: Unlike Dyneema, Kevlar can be susceptible to corrosion.
  • Cost: It can be expensive, and the initial investment may be higher than other materials.

Choosing between Dyneema and Kevlar depends on your specific sailing needs and priorities. Dyneema is favored for its strength, low stretch, and light weight, while Kevlar excels in abrasion resistance and tensile strength. Consider these factors when making your rigging material selection.

Stainless Steel Yacht Rigging

When it comes to yacht rigging, durability is paramount, and stainless steel rigging wires stand out as a top choice. Their robust nature, coupled with an unmistakable touch of elegance, makes them an ideal option for discerning sailors. Stainless steel yacht rigging is highly resistant to corrosion, even in the harsh marine environment. This resistance not only ensures a longer lifespan but also reduces maintenance efforts, allowing you to spend more time on the water. Additionally, the sleek appearance of stainless steel adds a touch of sophistication to your vessel. Whether you're cruising the open seas or participating in regattas, stainless steel yacht rigging combines style and substance to offer a premium sailing experience.

Spectra Standing Rigging

Spectra standing rigging is a game-changer for sailors seeking top-tier performance and durability. This advanced material, known for its incredible strength and low stretch properties, has revolutionized the way we approach standing rigging. Spectra rigging offers advantages that are hard to beat – it enhances the stability and safety of your vessel while providing exceptional responsiveness. The minimal stretch ensures precise sail control, making it the go-to choice for those who demand the utmost from their rigging. If you're looking to take your sailing experience to the next level, Spectra standing rigging is a choice that can't be ignored.

Read our top notch articles on topics such as sailing, sailing tips and destinations in our  Magazine.

Rigging a Yacht: A Step-By-Step Guide

Now that you've grasped the basics and material options, let's dive into the practical aspect of rigging a yacht. Follow these steps to ensure a smooth and safe sailing experience.

Planning and Preparation

Rigging a yacht is a meticulous process that requires careful planning and thorough preparation. Before embarking on your sailing adventure, it's crucial to ensure that every aspect of your yacht's rigging is in top-notch condition. The advantages of this step-by-step guide are manifold. It guarantees the safety of both the vessel and its passengers, reduces the risk of mid-sail complications, and ultimately enhances your overall sailing experience. By meticulously inspecting your rigging and addressing any issues during the planning and preparation phase, you can set sail with confidence, knowing that your yacht is ready to navigate the open waters seamlessly.

Inspecting Your Rigging

Rigging a yacht is a meticulous process that demands careful attention to detail. One crucial aspect is inspecting your rigging. This step ensures the safety and efficiency of your sailing adventure. Regular inspections , even before you set sail, can identify potential issues and help prevent mishaps on the water . Inspecting your rigging is not only a safety measure but also a way to guarantee that your yacht performs at its best, allowing you to enjoy smooth and stress-free sailing experiences.

Rigging Replacement

When it comes to maintaining your yacht's rigging, the necessity of rigging replacement cannot be overstated. Whether due to wear and tear or a desire to upgrade to modern materials, knowing when and how to replace your rigging is crucial.

Specialized Rigs for Small Sailboats

For small sailboat enthusiasts , specialized rigs can enhance your sailing experience. Explore the options available for these nimble vessels.

Ship Rigging Terms

Sailboat rigging comes with its unique terminology. Get acquainted with the essential terms: 

  • Mast: The vertical spar or structure that supports sails and rigging.
  • Boom: A horizontal spar that extends from the mast to support the bottom of a sail.
  • Shroud: Rigging wires that support the mast from the sides.
  • Stay: Rigging wires that support the mast from the front or back.
  • Halyard: Lines used to raise and lower sails.
  • Sheet: Lines used to control the angle of the sails with respect to the wind.
  • Jib: A triangular foresail set in front of the mast.
  • Tack: The lower forward corner of a sail.
  • Clew: The lower after corner of a sail.
  • Topping Lift: A line that supports the boom when the sail is not in use.

Understanding these ship rigging terms is essential for efficient and safe sailing, allowing you to communicate effectively with your crew and navigate the open waters with confidence.

Sailboat Stays and Shrouds

Sailboat rigging comprises various components, and among the most critical are sailboat stays and shrouds. Stays are the fixed support cables or wires that keep the mast upright, while shrouds add lateral support, preventing the mast from swaying. These components work together to maintain the mast's stability and ensure safe and efficient sailing. The proper tension and alignment of stays and shrouds are crucial for the overall performance and safety of a sailboat. Regular inspections and maintenance of these rigging elements are essential to prevent wear and tear, making sure they remain reliable on your sailing adventures. Understanding the role of sailboat stays and shrouds is fundamental for any sailor, whether you're navigating coastal waters or crossing the open sea.

In conclusion, boat rigging is a multifaceted subject that greatly influences your sailing experience. Understanding the fundamentals, material choices, and the process of rigging a yacht is essential for a successful voyage.

So what are you waiting for? Take a look at our  range of charter boats  and head to some of our favourite  sailing  destinations .
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Yachting Monthly

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Troubleshooting problems with your yacht rigging

Bruce Jacobs

  • Bruce Jacobs
  • February 18, 2022

Do you know how to prevent problems with your yacht rigging and sails, and what to do when things go wrong? Bruce Jacobs looks at the six most common problems...

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Yacht rigging is a dark art and no one will ever convince me otherwise. I have yet to meet two riggers who agree on anything – and there is no manual to read up on. It is a world of angles, tension, loads, corrosion, metal fatigue and, most of all, opinions.

Ask your surveyor , rigger and insurance company a question about a rig and you’ll see what I mean. It is perhaps no surprise therefore that the rig ends up being one of the most commonly overlooked areas on a yacht with regard to maintenance, even though it should be near the top.

With Rubicon 3 yachts sailing high up in the Arctic or far out on the oceans, rig condition is something we obsess about. For many sailors, however, the first time they really think about their rig issue will be when they are at sea and things start to go wrong.

Many years ago, I was delivering a 50ft Beneteau across the Tyrrhenian Sea from Corsica to Sicily. With only two of us on board, we were short-handed but expecting no more than a Force 6.

As is not uncommon in this area in early autumn, a mini weather system came through and things quickly got difficult. As we tried to reduce sail, the roller furler jammed. A nasty situation was made worse as the autopilot was overwhelmed by the now 40-knot winds and big sea state.

Devise an emergency plan

The decision was made to drop the sail, so we fully unfurled it (quite something in these winds) and began to lower the halyard. It jammed halfway down. Unable now to get it up or down, or furl it away, we were left with a full genoa, halfway up the forestay and completely out of control, doing its best to shake the rig to destruction.

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Furling sails make life easy, but a jam can be serious

It was now a severe gale, with lightning visibly striking the water and hail lashing the deck. A 50-knot-plus gust proved to be our saving grace. Its force was enough to free the jammed swivel and the sail came crashing down onto the foredeck and was quickly bundled down the hatch.

A later inspection in Sicily showed that two rivets had come loose in the foil causing all the problems. It was a lesson well learnt about the need for proper maintenance.

It is worth considering what could go wrong with your sails and rig and how you would cope if it does. This article covers six of the most common issues you may face and how to prevent them happening.

A word of caution. Even in light winds, sails, ropes and wire rigging can cause serious injury. Be extremely careful and get professional assistance wherever possible.

Roller Furler Problems

The development of the roller reefing furler was undoubtedly one of the biggest aids to cruising. At a stroke it removed the need to head out onto the foredeck in strong winds and haul-down sails, lash them to the deck, hank on a new sail and hoist it up. Instead we can now control the headsail area from the comfort and safety of our cockpit.

Remember, however, that the typical genoa for a 40ft boat will be over 40m2 (430sq ft) of sail. You can be sailing along in a fresh breeze and suddenly have all that sail open up.

Roller furlers can also jam fully open, fully closed or somewhere in between. In any of these situations, you could have a serious situation on your hands.

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

There should still be some turns on the drum when furled, but too many could cause a jam

Sail jammed closed

Likely more of a frustration than a serious issue. Check to see the furling line is not jammed in the furling unit. If the rope is too thick or too much is left on the drum, it’s possible for a jam to occur. Ideally, look to have three turns left on the drum when fully stored.

If the line is not jammed, you likely have other issues such as seized swivel drum unit bearings or a halyard wrap. You will need to wait for the wind to drop, remove the sheets, manually unwind the sail, drop it and find the cause of the issue.

Sail jammed open

A dangerous situation and one you need to rectify quickly. Have a quick check with the binoculars that it is not a halyard wrap. If it’s not, the most likely scenario is that the sail opened too fast, or with not enough sheet tension, and the furling line is now jammed in the drum.

If it is safe to do so, open the drum and manually unwind the line, before re winding it. If this doesn’t help, you likely have a problem with the bearings in the swivel or drum.

Bring the sail under control, unattach it from the furler drum and lower it. Then inspect and repair it, but only if it is safe to do so.

Halyard wrap

If the halyard wraps around the forestay when furling, try opening up the sail again, depower it and let it luff a little to shake things loose. Then try refurling. If the wrap isn’t too bad, this can free it. You may need to do this multiple times to get the sail fully furled.

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

The halyard and foil should not be parallel at the masthead

If this doesn’t work, your only choice is to unfurl the sail fully, unattach the tack from the furling drum and lower the sail, pulling it out of the foil as you do so. You’ll need to try and work out why the wrap is happening (usually it’s because of an issue with the length of halyard or its lead angle to the swivel).

Sail jammed half open

This is probably your worst case scenario, as now you can neither furl the sail nor open it and drop it. Probably your only option, and you really need to be careful that the wind is not too strong, is to remove the sheets and try to pass the sail around the forestay and gradually get it under control, lashing it with sail ties or rope where possible.

If this is impossible and you’re in trouble, you may ultimately have to cut the sail off, in itself a hazardous operation.

Never force a roller furler

When a sail won’t open or close it can be hugely tempting to put the line on the winch and try and force it open. This is a recipe for disaster. If the swivel is jammed, the furling line has riding turns or the bearings are gone, putting more force on the system will likely increase your problems. Wherever you can, try to solve the issue, not force it.

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Keep an eye on the furling drum, and on the masthead swivel to avoid halyard wraps or other problems. Avoid using the winch to furl the sail away

In-mast mainsail furling issues

To prevent your mainsail jamming, it’s important to understand that it works in a similar way to your genoa furler. The luff of the sail slides into an aluminium foil which then rolls the sail away, usually in an anti- clockwise direction.

The big issue is that all the sail has to fit into the mast, and unless you furl it away carefully, it will jam. Try to furl on starboard tack, to reduce friction where the sail enters the mast.

Ease the mainsheet and outhaul a little. Too much outhaul and you can bend the furler. Too little and the foot will be too loose and jam. This will also happen more as your sail ages and gets baggy, hence why mast furled sails need to be replaced more often.

Even if you do get the sail furled away, if it went in too loose, you can find it hard to get back out. You need a nice tight wrap.

If you’re still jamming, make sure your boom height is keeping the luff straight and check your halyard tension as vertical creases can cause problems. You want to have just lost your horizontal creases.

If you have adjusted your backstay tension, you may find your furling mechanism is jamming inside the mast.

Maintenance Tips

With roller furlers, it really is the case that prevention is better than cure. Follow this guide and hopefully you won’t have to worry about the issues described.

You or your rigger should be conducting an annual full mast-up rig inspection. As part of this, if you haven’t dropped your sail recently and inspected the swivel, drum, foil, sail and halyard, you really should do so before you sail again.

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

A mast-up rig inspection should be done every year

To prevent halyard wraps, with the sail hoisted, make sure the remaining halyard is not too long. Ideally its lead to the swivel should also not be vertical, but at around 10-15°. A loose forestay can also cause wraps, so check tension.

Make sure the furling line heads into the drum at 90° to prevent riding turns. Wash the furling drum with lots of fresh water to stop salt and dirt deposits building up inside. Open the drum and make sure you can see where and how the furling line attaches in case you ever need to replace it in a crisis. Make sure the line has no chafe.

With the sail lowered, turn the swivel and furling unit. They should turn easily, without any bumps or jams. If not, the bearings may well be worn and you should have the unit repaired.

Still with the sail lowered and using binoculars, or heading up on a bosun’s chair, inspect the joins on the foil. Screws and rivets can begin to push out and jam the unit should you try to lower it next time (which may be an emergency).

Broken or lost halyard

A halyard breaking or coming loose whilst under sail is not a pleasant experience and can be dangerous. It really should not happen, and if it does there has been a fault somewhere. Either the halyard was not strong enough for the job, it has chafed through or the shackle has failed or was not closed properly.

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

If this spinnaker halyard had chafed through, it could have resulted in the loss of the sail as well as the halyard

Either way, once it has detached from the sail you are left with a nasty situation and you need to try and stop it getting worse. A word of caution. The mainsail is what holds the boom up under sail, so if the main halyard comes loose you have a potentially dangerous situation.

This is why you must always leave the topping lift loosely attached or have a boom strut that can support its weight. It is a key safety device and will stop the boom dropping down onto someone in the cockpit.

As always in a crisis, the first thing to do is stop and take a minute to collect your thoughts. Get the boat hove to as best you can to reduce the motion and minimise speed. If at all possible, you want to stop the halyard disappearing down the mast, so be gentle and don’t haul on any ropes.

Although there are various suggestions and gadgets you will be told about, in most cases the next step is a journey to the top of the mast and this is best done alongside in calm conditions. Not only will it be safer for you, but the halyards will be hanging vertically down rather than flying out to the leeward side.

If the rope has not gone down into the mast, your best bet is to grab hold of it and as you are lowered down, bring the rope with you. If it is still long enough, you can remake your halyard. If it is now too short, you can reeve a new halyard to the end of it and keep pulling through until you are fixed.

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Fish out the new halyard with a bent piece of mousing wire

If you are unfortunate enough for the halyard to have disappeared down the mast, life is trickier. First, pull all the other halyards tight, so that they do not get in the way. Next get some thin messenger and firmly attached a weight to the end of it. Some bike chain or a row of bolt nuts can be really good for this.

Leaded rope is also an excellent choice (it’s worth having some on board just for this) and is less likely to get caught up in the internal spreader bar or cross bolts.

Lower your weighted messenger line down from the top of the mast until it is just past the exit gate for the halyard. The weight generally makes enough noise against the mast to hear where it’s currently at.

If you’re using a bike chain, a magnet on a stick can pull it out of the gate. Whether using chain or a leaded rope, it’s also worth having some welding rod or mousing wire shaped into a hook, as this will also grab the line.

Now pull the messenger line out of the gate and down to deck level. Now attach a new halyard to the messenger line and pull it through.

Broken Rigging

Your mast and rigging should be unstepped and have a full ground level inspection every four to five years, looking for corrosion, metal fatigue, damaged fittings, seized parts and more.

Thereafter, every sailor should be carrying out a general check on all their rigging prior to leaving the dock. Standing rigging has a maximum life of 10 years or 40,000 miles, whichever comes first, so you should make sure you know where yours is in its life cycle.

Wire rigging has the advantage that should a strand break you can see it and know that immediate action needs to be taken. Rod rigging however, unless serviced on a regular basis, may fail without warning.

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

In the Golden Globe Race, Jean-Luc van den Heede’s lower shroud bolt pulled down through the mast wall

Rigging tends to suffer from fatigue due to lack of articulation when the rigging goes slack on the leeward side. If it’s going to break, it is almost certainly going to happen between the swage or mechanical terminal fittings and wire and it will likely be shortly after the previously slack leeward side is brought back under load after a tack or gybe.

However much you care for your rig, it’s possible that failures can still occur. Should a failure occur, you have to act fast. The golden rule is to get the load onto the opposite rigging as fast as possible.

So if your port shroud breaks, get onto starboard tack. If your forestay breaks, head down wind. Immediately use every spare halyard you have, attaching them to strong points near where the rigging was attached and crank them in hard. They will give your mast some added support.

Also, slow your boat right down, reef your mainsail to bring the centre of effort as low as possible and do everything you can to reduce the loads on the rig.

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

If you spot a wire strand fail while at sea, tack immediately to take the load off that side

It’s often best not to take your mainsail all the way down as it acts as a damper to reduce rolling. If a shroud goes, you will have to see if there is a way to jury rig it to the deck and then tension it to support the mast – but this really depends on what has broken and what you have left to work with.

A really useful back-up to consider is extended mechanical compression terminals, such as Sta-lock. It will mean using a hacksaw to cut off the end of the rigging wire, but they are then relatively easy to fit and will give you a good chance of getting underway again.

When it all goes wrong, it generally happens quickly and dramatically. Whatever the cause, when a mast decides it’s coming down, there is no stopping it.

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

A real-life dismasting can be a strangely slow-motion affair. Note the port cap shroud fails first, letting the top of the mast fall off to leeward

I have only had the misfortune to be dismasted once, and it was a curiously slow-motion affair, watching the aluminium spar bend and come down onto the deck.

It is obviously a dangerous time and keeping the crew safe is paramount. You will be in shock and as always, your first step has to be to pause, control your emotions and make a quick plan.

There will likely be loose standing and running rigging, and this can be swinging wildly. Put on some heavy-duty gloves (from your flare box, perhaps) and try to grab these and get them under control. Use sail ties or whatever you have to hand. You have to reduce the risk of injury to crew as quickly as you can.

If any spars are in the water, they can quickly act like a battering ram and cause you real problems. You have to do whatever you can to prevent damage to your hull. Try using fenders, bunk mattresses or whatever else you can find. Don’t be too quick to cut it away. You may need to try and make a jury rig and this spar might be your best bet If you can get it safely back on board.

But make no mistake, recovering a spar from the water will likely be very difficult and in tough conditions, almost impossible. What you must not do is end up with a casualty overboard or a crew member injured on deck.

If you can recover it, get it lashed down until you can make a plan. If you have to cut it away if you can’t retrieve it, cut it loose and protect the hull yourselves.

A good fine-toothed hacksaw is very often the best bet, making sure it has a strong metal not plastic frame and that you have a good few spare blades. Although very expensive, a set of hydraulic bolt croppers is also a near fail-safe option.

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Adult Learn to Sail (18+yrs)

We offer the Australian Sailing National Keelboat Program which is the flagship beginners training program.  The courses provide an enjoyable and accessible entry into sailing, equipping you with the essential skills required to safely sail a small inshore keelboat.

Our extremely popular Women’s Sailing program, whilst less structured, also offers a progressive skill development program mixed in with fun, encouragement and comradery.

Sailing on the inshore waters of Newcastle Harbour gives us the opportunity to sail in a protected yet challenging waterway, with fantastic views and varied conditions.

We welcome you to join us and start your sailing journey with us today . . .

Start Crewing

Start crewing, learn the basics of sailing on a keelboat . . ..

This course is the first step on the Australian Sailing  accredited pathway to learning to sail a small inshore keelboat.

It is an ideal course for adults and teenagers (16yrs+) who are looking to develop or improve their sailing skills. You do not need any prior experience.

This is the best way to start sailing – on board from lesson one!

Course Description This beginner’s course teaches boat handling, safety and sailing theory.

Upon completion of the 12-hour course, participants will understand how to control and manipulate the different parts of the boat in order to create drive and momentum across the water. You will learn how to ‘tack’ & ‘gybe’, trim the ‘mainsail’ & ‘jib’, and learn how the sails can actually steer the boat!

The course also introduces other essential areas including weather, tides, knots and general safety procedures like ‘right of way’ rules.

Course Info: Course Length: 4 x 3.5-hour practical sessions Minimum Age: 16 years Maximum number of crew on a boat: Five (4 students + 1 Instructor) Course cost: $345 per person (mid-week), $375 per person (weekend)

Included in course fee:

  • Minimum of 12 hours instruction by qualified instructors
  • Use of personal safety equipment including life jacket
  • Waterproof course kit with  National Keelboat Program  logbook &  Introductory Keelboat  textbook
  • Your own piece of rope for knot tying practise!
  • NCYC Training Membership – valid for three months from course commencement date
  • Upon successful completion, a nationally recognised  Australian Sailing certificate

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Start Helming

Start helming, develop your skills of helming . . ..

This is the next step on the Australian Sailing  accredited pathway to learning to sail a small inshore keelboat.

Course Description: This course develops both your theory and practical skills to confidently take control on the helm.

You will learn preparation of the boat, helming & trimming on all points-of-sail, using telltales to helm effectively and affect the recovery of man-overboard whilst at the helm.

This further 12-hour course will also provide you with more of the valuable time-on-water that helps to develop your skills in differing wind and environmental conditions.

You will learn key concepts including how sails can control the steering of a boat not just the rudder, as well as luffing, heave-to and getting out of “irons”.

The course also introduces other essential areas including weather, ropework and general seamanship skills like anchoring and reefing sails.

This course is highly recommended for those who have completed the Start Crewing course or who have some prior sailing experience and it readies students for other courses we conduct such as  Start Skippering  and  Spinnak ers.

Course Info: Course Length: 4 x 3.5-hour practical sessions Minimum Age: 16 years Maximum number of crew on a boat: Five (4 students + 1 Instructor) Course cost: $345 per person (midweek), $375 per person (weekend)

  • Use of a Force 24 inshore keelboat, sails and equipment
  • Use of personal safety equipment including a life jacket
  • Upon successful completion, a nationally recognised  Australian Sailing certificate.

Start Skippering

Start skippering, learn the seamanship skills to skipper a boat . . ..

The Start Skippering  course is the next progressive step in the  Australian Sailing accredited pathway and will now advance your seamanship skills and safety knowledge to enable you to skipper a boat, unsupervised, in sheltered waters.

Recommended for those who have completed Start Crewing  and  Start Helming courses or those who have established sailing skills.

Course Description: This course begins to develop your broader ‘seamanship’ skills and covers navigation, interpreting weather & environmental conditions, basic boat maintenance, assessing risks on-board, and actions to be taken in an emergency.

Important boat handling skills & techniques to enable you to berth alongside a pontoon, pick up & leave a mooring, come-to & weigh anchor, heave-to, and sail backwards.

You are really starting to become an inshore mariner!

Course Info: Course Length: 4 x 3.5-hour sessions Minimum Age: 16 years Maximum number of crew on a boat: Five (4 students + 1 instructor) Course Cost: $345 per person (mid-week0, $375 per person (weekend)

  • Use of personal safety equipment including life jacket
  • NCYC Training Membership – valid for three months from course commencement date
  • Upon successful completion, a nationally recognised Australian Sailing certificate

Learn the specialised skills of using spinnakers . . .

The  Spinnakers course is a further step on the Australian Sailing  accredited pathway to learning to sail a small inshore keelboat.

Using a third sail when sailing across or downwind ultimately helps you get to your destination sooner!

Knowing how to use spinnakers is a highly regarded crewing skill and one of the key elements of a Bow-person or Trimmers role on a boat.

This course is recommended for those who have completed the  Start Crewing  and  Start Helming  courses and have had further sailing experience/time-on-water.  Also suitable for those who have established sailing skills.

Course Description This course covers all the skills required to hoist, trim and drop a symmetrical spinnaker.

Upon completion of the course, participants will understand how to hoist a spinnaker and set using either a spinnaker pole or by ‘floating’.

You will learn how to correctly trim the spinnaker to get maximum benefit from the extra sail area on various angles of wind including pole position & height.

Spinnaker trim when gybing, and how to gybe the pole will be covered and then you will learn how to drop the kite quickly and efficiently so it’s ready to go back up again without any tangles!

The course also covers asymmetrical spinnaker theory.

Course Info: Course Length: 4 x 3.5-hour practical sessions Minimum Age: 16 years Maximum number of crew on a boat: 5 (4 students + 1 Instructor) Cost: $375 per person (weekend)

  • Use of specialised training equipment

Start Racing

Start racing.

The  Start Racing  course is a further specialised step on the  Australian Sailing  accredited pathway to learning to sail a small inshore keelboat.

Designed for sailors who have a good level of general sailing experience and now wish to develop their racing skills.

Course Description: On one of our Force 24 inshore keelboats, you will learn about the racing rules of sailing, course racing flags & sound signals, skills & tactics of racing, as well as gain an understanding of what is expected of a racing crew on a small boat.

The course aims to teach you about sail and boat speed optimisation, as well as the tactical skills to get around the race course as fast as possible!

The course will cover basic racing equipment, understanding teamwork, basic rules of racing, and crew communications.

Course Info: Course Length: 4 x 3.5-hour practical sessions Minimum Age: 16 years Maximum number of crew on a boat: 5 (4 students + 1 Instructor) Cost: $375 per person.

Register your interest with [email protected]

Women's Sailing courses

Women’s sailing, it’s social . . . it’s relaxing . . . it’s fun.

Whether you’re a seasoned sailor or never been on a boat, these sessions aim to introduce more women to the wonderful world of sailing in a supportive environment.

Our 4-week course is aimed at all skill levels.  It offers a great social time out on the water and also an opportunity to relax and clear your mind!  Women of all ages 16 years and over are welcome.

We sail on Thursdays after work 5:15pm to 7:45pm during daylight savings time and on Friday mornings 9:00am to 11:30am all year ’round.

The cost is $210 per person   /  Discounted to $185 for return attendees.

Many sailors do several courses to increase their skills, knowledge and confidence . . . and just because it’s fun!

Please allow an extra half an hour or so on the final week of your course as we celebrate your achievements with our renowned ‘Bubbles & Nibbles’ presentation, beautiful sparkling wines and chef prepared finger foods in the NCYC Clubhouse.

“The course surpassed my expectations. I felt tentative as I had no idea what I was doing. A sailing experience in the Whitsundays left me terrified and aware that I need to know what to do to be useful on a boat and not just a terrified dumb passenger.”
“The instructors were wonderful. We had a different instructor each time we went out. I enjoyed the variety and the different approaches to teaching and learning. The styles were quite different which meant we could take away what we could based on our own style of learning. They were all wonderful indeed, they were patient and respectful. And they knew what they were doing which meant I felt safe.”
“I am thoroughly enjoying the course, time on the water, learning, the company of the other ladies and our instructors.  Sailing on Fridays is definitely a highlight of my week!”
“The courses (trainers!) have been great all the way, and our little crew are really starting to feel we know what we are doing.  It was especially exciting last Friday to start learning to manage the spinnaker.”
“The ladies had an absolute ball last night, they didn’t want to go home, stayed in the club after dinner until late telling ‘Sailing Stories!’ Thanks to your great instructors, everyone had fun and learned lots too.”

SheSAILS@NCYC

WHAT NEXT?:

We have an active group of women sailors who regularly compete in NCYC club racing as well as local and interstate passage races and regattas.

If you are interested in gaining a position on a racing keelboat for more fun and experience, please contact us at the Sailing Academy [email protected]  and we will put you in touch with our “ SheSAILS@NCYC ” ambassadors.  You can also get more information from the SheSAILS webpage or follow them on facebook

NCYC run two  SheSAILS@NCYC  regattas each year:

  • Development Regatta – March – for graduates of the Sailing Academy to experience an “around the buoys” regatta with an experienced skipper on board.  Raced in the Force 24s.  Nominate individually. SO much fun!
  • Open Regatta  –  November – for experienced crews to race in a top standard inshore regatta, windward/leeward races in the Elliott 6s.  Enter crews of 3-4 members.

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Private Lessons

Private lessons, are you interested in having one-on-one tuition with a qualified and highly experienced instructor.

Private lessons cater to all ages and experience levels, and are perfect for those wanting to learn, re-learn or further develop their sailing skills.

The lessons can be organised at times that suit you and are charged on a ‘per boat’ basis.  You can organise up to three friends or family to join you for the same price as one person!  We do require a minimum of two guests plus our instructor to sail the boats safely.  Minimum age is 7 years if accompanied by an adult.

We will provide one of our Sailing Academy small inshore keelboats and all of the required safety equipment, plus a lifejacket or PFD for each participant.

Prices differ from weekdays to Saturdays or Sundays, and are calculated based on the number of hours per session.

For more information, please contact our Sailing Academy staff – [email protected]

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

What to Wear

What to wear.

All you need to wear are some comfortable, warm clothes that are suitable for outdoor activity and allow you freedom of movement, with a pair of enclosed shoes to protect your feet.

Active wear is suitable or shorts/trousers & t-shirt/polo shirt.  A wind/spray jacket is a good idea for cooler days.

Joggers/sandshoes or any non-marking rubber soled shoes that provide support would be suitable.

For sun protection we recommend a hat with a chin strap or one that is firm fitting so as not to blow off in the wind.  Don’t forget suncream!  Sunglasses should be secured with a flexible strap if possible.

We will supply you with a correctly fitting self inflating life-jacket or personal flotation device(PFD).

Your ‘sailing gear’ may get slightly wet from occasional splashes.

The Boats we Sail

Our adult sailing courses are conducted on the Club’s fleet of ‘Force 24’ keelboats, which are 24 feet (7.31m) long and carry an Instructor and up to four course participants.

We will sail with a headsail or jib (small sail at the front) and a mainsail (large sail on the tall mast).  All sailing boats lean to the side with the wind but these boats were specifically designed for teaching beginning sailors and are very stable. They have a large lead keel for ballast that prevents the boat from tipping over.

As a course participant you will be actively involved in sailing the boats, pulling ropes, moving around the boat and most importantly ducking under the boom to swap sides as you tack or gybe to change directions.  Your instructor will lead you through all of these sailing terms and will explain (and support your through) each of these actions.

We will be sailing inshore on the mainly flat waters of Newcastle Harbour, we do not go out onto the ocean.

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Our Instructors

Instructors.

Our wonderful team of Instructors are all skilled and experienced sailors, many of whom actively sail themselves every weekend.

All hold specific keelboat qualifications with Australian Sailing (AS) as well as additional & complimentary certifications.

  • AS Keelboat Instructor certificate
  • Instructor General Principles
  • First Aid certificate
  • Working with Children Check
  • Powerboat Handling certificate and General Boat Licence

Adult Sailing Pathway

Adult sailing pathway.

NCYC has developed a comprehensive Sailing Pathway to help guide sailors of all ages and abilities in the right direction and is one of only a few clubs in Australia that deliver all Australian Sailing pathway levels, from the beginnings right through to the advanced programs.

We are continually developing opportunities to support those who have come through the Sailing Academy and wish to continue on to progress their skills and knowledge in various sailing activities.

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently asked questions.

Details are being updated and will be posted soon!

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Number 1  National Keelboat Program centre in Australia

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Number 3 Discover Sailing C entre in Australia

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Number 7 Tackers centre in Australia

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Number 9 OutThere Sailing centre in Australia

Australian Sailing Annual Participation Report 2023

Contact Us: For more information or assistance with booking, please contact us at the Sailing Academy! (02) 4940 8188 [email protected]

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  • Rigging/Sails
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Newcastle sailor, 82, sets off on 20,000 mile Arctic challenge after cancer diagnosis

  • North Shields
  • Monday 8 July 2024 at 6:46pm

newcastle yacht rigging and sails

Chris Conway was quayside in North Shields as David Scott Cowper set off for the Northwest Passage

The first person to sail solo around the world in both directions is heading back out to sea on an adventure to the Arctic - at the age of 82 and while undergoing treatment for cancer.

David Scott Cowper was waved off by a big crowd at North Shields Marina on Monday (8 July) as he set sail on the 20,000 mile voyage.

The challenge, raising money for patient care charity Daft as a Brush, is being taken on alongside shipmate Suzannah Broome and will see the pair travel through the Northwest Passage, which connects the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

Buoyed by the good weather, David told ITV Tyne Tees he hoped for more but warned the journey would likely be treacherous as it takes in some of the world's choppiest waters.

"We hope we might have plenty of days like this - bright, sunny morning, very light winds," he said.

"But I expect we will encounter gales and storms en route. This is going to be a hard voyage, it's no easy task."

Despite the challenges the duo could face, David is a highly experienced sailor and believes this will serve to keep them safe.

"When you consider I've done six circumnavigations around the world - and the capes I've been around - I've been down to Antarctica three times, through the Northwest Passage eight times, so I have a reasonable amount of experience," he said.

David initially intended to set off in July last year but his cancer diagnosis meant the trip was put on hold.

While receiving treatment at Newcastle's Freeman Hospital he became familiar with the work of Daft as a Brush.

He now hopes to raise funds through the challenge to raise money for new cancer patient ambulances for the charity.

"It is all about cancer patient care and transport," said ship-mate Suzannah. "Transporting them to and from the hospital for their treatment. And what are we doing? Transporting ourselves through the North West passage. So I think it's very apt."

The pair are due back at the end of October when David will undergo further cancer treatment.

Want a quick and expert briefing on the biggest news stories? Listen to our latest podcasts to find out What You Need To Know...

A celebration of all things sail!

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Cock of the Harbour

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FREE Try Sailing

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Newcastle Cruising Yacht Club and Port Hunter 16-Foot Skiff Sailing Club proudly present the annual SailFest Newcastle Regatta

22-24 march 2025.

In a celebration of all things sail, Newcastle Harbour and the city’s pristine coastline come alive with grand-prix TP52 yachts, offshore racers, high-speed skiffs and catamarans, Try-Sailing experiences and more. It rekindles the historic Newcastle Regatta, dating back to 1854, and evokes the maritime traditions of Australia’s oldest export port – albeit with a modern-day twist.

With thanks to our major supporters City of Newcastle  and Transport for NSW.

Our Supporters

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From drama to calmer in national title finale

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Day 2 marked by course confusion

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    I highly recommend Newcastle Yacht Rigging and Sails. Patrick displays a professional passion for yachting, provides expert knowledge, quality workmanship, accurate quoting and always happy to share and teach his skills. This included new rigging x2, sails, covers and providing valuable lessons along the way. ...

  7. Newcastle Yacht Rigging and Sails Australia

    Yacht rental Newcastle Yacht Rigging and Sails in ratings 2024: Not in TOP-3 В рейтинге лучших аренд яхт Newcastle Yacht Rigging and Sails занимает 47 место .

  8. What's near to Newcastle Yacht Rigging and Sails

    What's near to Newcastle Yacht Rigging and Sails, which located Newcastle Yacht Rigging and Sails, Marina, 1, Newcastle Yacht Rigging and Sails, 1 Nanda St, Marmong Point NSW 2284, Australia

  9. Newcastle Yacht Rigging and Sails in Newcastle

    In Newcastle, Infobel has listed 81,285 registered companies. These companies have an estimated turnover of $ 156.717 billions and employ a number of employees estimated at 643,183. The company best placed in Newcastle in our national ranking is in position #1 in terms of turnover.

  10. Bay Sailing Centre

    The Bay Sailing Centre, formerly known as Port Stephens Sailing and Aquatic Club, is a sub-location of the Newcastle Cruising Yacht Club. The Bay Sailing Centre venue has a 40-year history of hosting local dinghy sailing as well as delivering major world, national and state championships. Situated on the shores of Salamander Bay, it faces east ...

  11. North Sails Newcastle from East Coast Marine & Sail, the sole North

    Situated right in the heart of Newcastle's lively yachting scene, East Coast Marine & Sail is the place to head for all your sailmaking and chandlery needs. As the sole agent for North Sails in Newcastle, you are assured of the same expert knowledge and advice characteristic of the North Sails brand the world over. Sailmaking is not the only ...

  12. Boat Rigging: A Comprehensive Guide to Ensure Smooth Sailing

    Explore the intricacies of boat rigging, from standing rigging to sail rigging types. Learn about materials like Dyneema and stainless steel, and get expert guidance on rigging a yacht. Discover the key to safe and efficient sailing with our in-depth guide. +49 211 54 69 22 23. FormResult. Yacht Charter;

  13. The definitive guide to sailing yacht rigging

    Credit: Bill Tripp Design. The Bermudan rig is the all-rounder, able to perform well at all angles of sail. It is efficient upwind, while downwind the sail area can be significantly boosted with a big gennaker or spinnaker. For good reasons, it is the first choice for nearly every modern sailing yacht up to around 60 to 65 metres for cruising ...

  14. RCSails

    Rig Building Tips: IOM class rules don't allow rotating masts and the masts mostly used are without an internal track. The best mast is 12mm or ½" aluminum tube available at local hardware and metal stores. If you want to invest more you can order from RC yachting accessory dealers as well and save maybe 50g with the rig.

  15. Expert advice: sails and rigging

    Sails and rigging are the engine room of any sailing boat from small dinghies up to giant superyachts. No matter how big or how new your boat, the sails and rigging need to be checked regularly and will need intermittent updating. Updating of rigging on a yacht in particular will often be a requirement for insurance purposes so any owner will ...

  16. Troubleshooting problems with your yacht rigging

    Remember, however, that the typical genoa for a 40ft boat will be over 40m2 (430sq ft) of sail. You can be sailing along in a fresh breeze and suddenly have all that sail open up. Roller furlers can also jam fully open, fully closed or somewhere in between. In any of these situations, you could have a serious situation on your hands.

  17. 5 BEST Marine Sail Makers in Newcastle, NSW

    Compare multiple quotes from Boat & Yacht Equipment in your local area, so you get the right fit, the first time. ... Local Marine Sail Makers in Newcastle NSW. 5 Results for Marine Sail Makers Near You. Lake Mac Marine. Marine Sail Makers, Belmont, NSW 2280. Less info. Call. 0401 798 475. Less info. Endeavour Marine. Boat & Yacht Builders ...

  18. Adults

    Course Info: Course Length: 4 x 3.5-hour sessions. Minimum Age: 16 years. Maximum number of crew on a boat: Five (4 students + 1 instructor) Course Cost: $345 per person (mid-week0, $375 per person (weekend) Included in course fee: Minimum of 12 hours instruction by qualified instructors.

  19. Know-how: Modern Rigs 101

    Know-how: Modern Rigs 101. Peter Nielsen. Updated: May 20, 2024. Original: Mar 5, 2020. This classic Sabre carries the kind of masthead rig typical of its era; note how the large genoa sheets outside the shrouds (left); This X-Yachts performance-cruiser provides an excellent example of a modern fractional rig; note the narrow headsail (right ...

  20. Rigging Gear

    We can arrange the repair of your rigging hardware and/or sails here in our facility. Contact Us today for more information. Nance & Underwood Rigging and Sails. 262 SW 33rd Street · Fort Lauderdale Florida 33315. Ph: 954-764-6001 · Fax: 954-764-5977 · Toll Free: 800-328-9782.

  21. Newcastle sailor, 82, sets off on 20,000 mile Arctic challenge after

    The first person to sail solo around the world in both directions is heading back out to sea on an adventure to the Arctic - at the age of 82 and while undergoing treatment for cancer.

  22. SailFest Newcastle Regatta

    Newcastle Cruising Yacht Club and Port Hunter 16-Foot Skiff Sailing Club proudly present the annual SailFest Newcastle Regatta 22-24 March 2025. In a celebration of all things sail, Newcastle Harbour and the city's pristine coastline come alive with grand-prix TP52 yachts, offshore racers, high-speed skiffs and catamarans, Try-Sailing experiences and more.

  23. Newcastle Marine Yachts For Sale and Charter

    Newcastle Marine From $275,000 p/w. More yachts for charter. Filters. Yacht type. Length (m) 24 195. Year of Build. 1856 2028.