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Opinion: A Boglehead explains the simplest way to manage your money

Silvia ascarelli, just use 3 basic mutual funds, not this way....

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Taylor Larimore is a big advocate of keeping investing simple — simple enough to be handled with just three mutual funds. He says it means he doesn’t need to spend more than about an hour a year managing his money.

Larimore is also one of the founders of Bogleheads, a passionate community of investors inspired by Vanguard founder Jack Bogle. The forum’s members discuss investment advice online and organize meetups in some areas. The three-fund-portfolio is one of the most popular discussion topics.

Master your money.

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65 episodes

Podcast weblog featuring the investment wisdom and principles of John C. Bogle

Bogleheads On Investing Podcast bogleheads

  • 4.6 • 477 Ratings
  • DEC 21, 2023

Episode 65: Dr. Qian Wang, Vanguard economic and market outlook of 2024, host Rick Ferri

Qiun Wang, Ph.D., Vanguard’s Asia-Pacific chief economist and global head of the Vanguard Capital Markets Model team, discusses Vanguard’s annual economic and market outlook for 2024.

  • NOV 24, 2023

Episode 64: Victor Haghani and James White, ”The Missing Billionaires”, host Rick Ferri

Victor Haghani and James White are co-authors of ”The Missing Billionaires, A Guide to Better Financial Decisions.” This fascinating book discusses investment decision-making and risk-sizing and how to make better financial decisions with your wealth.

  • OCT 29, 2023

Episode 63: Dr. William Bernstein on TIPS, asset allocation, and four deep risks, host Rick Ferri

Dr. William (Bill) Bernstein is a retired neurologist, author, investment adviser, and financial historian. His research is in the field of modern portfolio theory and economic history. Bill has published extensively on investing and economic history, including eight books and numerous articles. He holds a Ph.D. and an M.D. Bill is a repeat guest, first appearing in Episode 13. In this episode, we discuss Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS), asset allocation in today's uncertain world, four deep risks, and the cost of income inequality.     This podcast is hosted by Rick Ferri, CFA, a long-time Boglehead and investment adviser. The Bogleheads are a group of like-minded individual investors who follow the general investment and business beliefs of John C. Bogle, founder and former CEO of the Vanguard Group. It is a conflict-free community where individual investors reach out and provide education, assistance, and relevant information to other investors of all experience levels at no cost. The organization supports a free forum at Bogleheads.org, and the wiki site is Bogleheads® wiki.    Since 2000, the Bogleheads' have held national conferences in major cities around the country. There are also many Local Chapters in the US and even a few Foreign Chapters that meet regularly. New Chapters are being added on a regular basis. All Bogleheads activities are coordinated by volunteers who contribute their time and talent.     This podcast is supported by the John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy, a non-profit organization approved by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) public charity on February 6, 2012. Your tax-deductible donation to the Bogle Center is appreciated.  

  • SEP 24, 2023

Episode 62: Steve Chen on DIY Retirement Planning Tech, host Jon Luskin

Steven Chen is the founder of NewRetirement, a do-it-yourself tool for retirement planning. Prior to founding NewRetirement, Stephen founded venture-backed companies in education and financial services, and worked with organizations including Charles Schwab, Dimensional Fund Advisors, and Fidelity.  This episode of the podcast is hosted by Jon Luskin, CFP®, a long-time Boglehead and financial planner. The Bogleheads are a group of like-minded individual investors who follow the general investment and business beliefs of John C. Bogle, founder and former CEO of the Vanguard Group. It is a conflict-free community where individual investors reach out and provide education, assistance, and relevant information to other investors of all experience levels at no cost. The organization supports a free forum at Bogleheads.org, and the wiki site is Bogleheads® wiki.  Since 2000, the Bogleheads' have held national conferences in major cities around the country. There are also many Local Chapters in the US and even a few Foreign Chapters that meet regularly. New Chapters are being added on a regular basis. All Bogleheads activities are coordinated by volunteers who contribute their time and talent.   This podcast is supported by the John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy, a non-profit organization approved by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) public charity on February 6, 2012. Your tax-deductible donation to the Bogle Center is appreciated. Show Notes 2023 Conference - The John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy Bogleheads® Live 41: Derek Tharp on Retirement Planning – 4% Rule vs. Monte Carlo Bogleheads on Investing with John Bogle – Episode 1 Bogleheads on Investing with William F. Sharpe: Episode 59 Bogleheads® investment philosophy Bogleheads® Live with Christine Benz: Episode 37 Bogleheads® Live with Christine Benz: Episode 5 Bogleheads on Investing with Cody Garrett: Episode 61 Bogleheads on Investing 58: Mike Piper on “More than Enough” Bogleheads® Live: Cameron Huddleston: talking to your parents about their finances Bogleheads® Live with Mike Piper: Episode 36 Bogleheads® Live with Steve Ryder: Episode 43 Bogleheads® 2022 Conference – Mike Piper- Social Security, Tax Planning Before and During Retirement Bogleheads® Live with Cameron Huddleston: Episode 34 Bogleheads on Investing with Mike Piper: Episode 58 Bogleheads® Forum Bogleheads® Wiki Bogleheads® Reddit Bogleheads® Facebook Bogleheads® LinkedIn Bogleheads® Twitter Bogleheads® on Investing podcast Bogleheads® YouTube  Bogleheads® Local Chapters Bogleheads® Virtual Online Chapters Bogleheads® on Investing Podcast Bogleheads® Conferences Bogleheads® Books The John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. At Boglecenter.net, your tax-deductible donations are greatly appreciated.

  • AUG 27, 2023

Episode 61: Cody Garrett on Early Retirement, host Jon Luskin

Cody Garrett is an advice-only financial planner passionate about helping families refine their path to financial independence (FI) as DIY investors. Cody specializes in comprehensive financial plan development, topic research, and personalized financial education.  This episode of the podcast is hosted by Jon Luskin, CFP®, a long-time Boglehead and financial planner. The Bogleheads are a group of like-minded individual investors who follow the general investment and business beliefs of John C. Bogle, founder and former CEO of the Vanguard Group. It is a conflict-free community where individual investors reach out and provide education, assistance, and relevant information to other investors of all experience levels at no cost. The organization supports a free forum at Bogleheads.org, and the wiki site is Bogleheads® wiki.  Since 2000, the Bogleheads' have held national conferences in major cities around the country. There are also many Local Chapters in the US and even a few Foreign Chapters that meet regularly. New Chapters are being added on a regular basis. All Bogleheads activities are coordinated by volunteers who contribute their time and talent.   This podcast is supported by the John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy, a non-profit organization approved by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) public charity on February 6, 2012. Your tax-deductible donation to the Bogle Center is appreciated.Show Notes 2023 Conference - The John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy Bogleheads Forum: U.S. Chapters Bogleheads® Live with Bill Bengen: Episode 35 Bogleheads® Live with Christine Benz: Episode 37 Bogleheads® Live 41: Derek Tharp on Retirement Planning – 4% Rule vs. Monte Carlo John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy Bogleheads® Chapter Series – Health care planning for retirement Bogleheads® 2022 Conference – Mike Piper- Social Security, Tax Planning Before and During Retirement Bogleheads® Live with Colleen Jaconetti : Episode 26 Bogleheads® investment philosophy ssa.tools Bogleheads® Live with Mike Piper: Episode 23 Open Social Security Mortgage Flexibility Calculator Bogleheads® Forum Bogleheads® Wiki Bogleheads® Reddit Bogleheads® Facebook Bogleheads® LinkedIn Bogleheads® Twitter Bogleheads® on Investing podcast Bogleheads® YouTube  Bogleheads® Local Chapters Bogleheads® Virtual Online Chapters Bogleheads® on Investing Podcast Bogleheads® Conferences Bogleheads® Books The John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. At Boglecenter.net, your tax-deductible donations are greatly appreciated.

  • JUL 23, 2023

Episode 60: Jonathan Clements on ”My Money Journey,” host Jon Luskin

Jonathan Clements is the founder and editor of HumbleDollar. He’s also the author of a fistful of personal finance books, including My Money Journey and How to Think About Money, and he sits on the advisory board of Creative Planning, one of the country’s largest independent financial advisors. Jonathan spent almost 20 years at The Wall Street Journal, where he was the newspaper’s personal finance columnist. Between October 1994 and April 2008, he wrote 1,009 columns for the Journal and for The Wall Street Journal Sunday. He then worked for six years at Citigroup, where he was Director of Financial Education for Citi Personal Wealth Management, before returning to the Journal for an additional 15-month stint as a columnist. An avid bicyclist, Jonathan was born in London, England, and graduated from Cambridge University. He worked for Euromoney magazine in London before moving to the New York area in 1986. He now lives in Philadelphia, close to his daughter, son-in-law and grandson. Prior to joining the Journal in January 1990, he covered mutual funds for Forbes magazine. Jonathan has written a novel and nine personal finance books, and also contributed to six others. This episode of the podcast is hosted by Jon Luskin, CFP®, a long-time Boglehead and financial planner. The Bogleheads are a group of like-minded individual investors who follow the general investment and business beliefs of John C. Bogle, founder and former CEO of the Vanguard Group. It is a conflict-free community where individual investors reach out and provide education, assistance, and relevant information to other investors of all experience levels at no cost. The organization supports a free forum at Bogleheads.org, and the wiki site is Bogleheads® wiki.  Since 2000, the Bogleheads' have held national conferences in major cities around the country. There are also many Local Chapters in the US and even a few Foreign Chapters that meet regularly. New Chapters are being added on a regular basis. All Bogleheads activities are coordinated by volunteers who contribute their time and talent.   This podcast is supported by the John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy, a non-profit organization approved by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) public charity on February 6, 2012. Your tax-deductible donation to the Bogle Center is appreciated.Show Notes Bogleheads on Investing with William F. Sharpe: Episode 59 Bogleheads® Live with Mike Piper: Episode 36 How I Invest 2022 by Meb Faber Should Equity Exposure Decrease In Retirement, Or Is A Rising Equity Glidepath Actually Better? Bogleheads® Live with Bill Bengen: Episode 35 Bogleheads® Live with Christine Benz: Episode 37 2023 Conference - The John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy Bogleheads® Forum Bogleheads® Wiki Bogleheads® Reddit Bogleheads® Facebook Bogleheads® LinkedIn Bogleheads® Twitter Bogleheads® on Investing podcast Bogleheads® YouTube  Bogleheads® Local Chapters Bogleheads® Virtual Online Chapters Bogleheads® on Investing Podcast Bogleheads® Conferences Bogleheads® Books The John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. At Boglecenter.net, your tax-deductible donations are greatly appreciated. Jonathan Clements is the founder and editor of HumbleDollar. He’s also the author of a fistful of personal finance books, including My Money Journey and How to Think About Money, and he sits on the advisory board of Creative Planning, one of the country’s largest independent financial advisors. Jonathan spent almost 20 years at The Wall Street Journal, where he was the newspaper’s personal finance columnist. Between October 1994 and April 2008, he wrote 1,009 columns for the Journal and for The Wall Street Journal Sunday. He then worked for six years at Citigroup, where he was Director of Financial Education for Citi Personal Wealth Management, before returning to the Journal for an additional 15-month sti

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Customer Reviews

477 Ratings

High Yield, Not Overproduced

This is just a plain, nuts & bolts discussion on personal finance. They delve just enough into economics concepts like interest rates, policy changes to public benefit plans, etc. without getting lost in the weeds.

Boogleheads

Always great viewpoints!

Solid investment advice

Great Bogleheads information. Always learn a lot

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Bogleheads On Investing Podcast

Bogleheads On Investing Podcast

https://feed.podbean.com/bogleheads/feed.xml

Bogleheads On Investing Podcast

Podcast weblog featuring the investment wisdom and principles of John C. Bogle

Episode 65: Dr. Qian Wang, Vanguard economic and market outlook of 2024, host Rick Ferri

Thursday Dec 21, 2023

Episode 65: Dr. Qian Wang, Vanguard economic and market outlook of 2024, host Rick Ferri

Qian Wang, Ph.D., is Vanguard’s Asia-Pacific chief economist and global head of the Vanguard Capital Markets Model team in the Investment Strategy Group. She is also a member of Vanguard’s Strategic Asset Allocation Committee and its Time-Varying Asset Allocation Subcommittee, which oversees and determines the asset allocation strategies of global multi-asset-class portfolios such as the Vanguard Target Retirement Funds. This podcast discusses the Vanguard economic and market outlook for 2024: A return to sound money.

Qian earned a Ph.D. in business administration from Stanford University, an M.A. in economics from Duke University, and a B.A. in international economics from Beijing University. Before joining Vanguard in 2014, Qian was director of research at a sovereign wealth fund based in Asia and the chief China economist and head of greater China macro research at J.P. Morgan. 

This podcast is hosted by Rick Ferri, CFA , a long-time Boglehead and investment adviser.  The Bogleheads  are a group of like-minded individual investors who follow the general investment and business beliefs of John C. Bogle, founder and former CEO of the Vanguard Group. It is a conflict-free community where individual investors reach out and provide education, assistance, and relevant information to other investors of all experience levels at no cost. The organization supports a free forum at  Bogleheads.org , and the wiki site is  Bogleheads® wiki . 

Since 2000, the Bogleheads' have held national conferences in major cities nationwide. There are also many Local Chapters in the US and even a few Foreign Chapters that meet regularly. New Chapters are being added regularly. All Bogleheads activities are coordinated by volunteers who contribute their time and talent.  

This podcast is supported by the  John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy , a non-profit organization approved by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) public charity on February 6, 2012. Your tax-deductible  donation  to the Bogle Center is appreciated.

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Episode 64: Victor Haghani and James White, ”The Missing Billionaires”, host Rick Ferri

Friday Nov 24, 2023

Episode 64: Victor Haghani and James White, ”The Missing Billionaires”, host Rick Ferri

Victor Haghani and James White are co-authors of "The Missing Billionaires, A Guide to Better Financial Decisions." Victor is also the founder and CIO of Elm Wealth and David is the CEO, where they implement these concepts for their clients. This fascinating book discusses investment decision-making and risk-sizing and how to make better financial decisions with your wealth.

Markets have behaved very well for 100 years, resulting in real profits for investors. However, few rich families from the early 1900s have been able to retain their wealth despite exceptional returns in the markets. The problem isn’t that people make poor decisions about what to invest in, they make poor “risk decisions” about how much risk to take and when to take it.

This podcast is hosted by  Rick Ferri, CFA , a long-time Boglehead and investment adviser.  The Bogleheads  are a group of like-minded individual investors who follow the general investment and business beliefs of John C. Bogle, founder and former CEO of the Vanguard Group. It is a conflict-free community where individual investors reach out and provide education, assistance, and relevant information to other investors of all experience levels at no cost. The organization supports a free forum at  Bogleheads.org , and the wiki site is  Bogleheads® wiki . 

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Episode 63: Dr. William Bernstein on TIPS, asset allocation, and four deep risks, host Rick Ferri

Sunday Oct 29, 2023

Episode 63: Dr. William Bernstein on TIPS, asset allocation, and four deep risks, host Rick Ferri

Dr. William (Bill) Bernstein is a retired neurologist, author, investment adviser , and financial historian. His research is in the field of modern portfolio theory and economic history. Bill has published extensively on investing and economic history, including eight books and numerous articles. He holds a Ph.D. and an M.D. Bill is a repeat guest, first appearing in Episode 13 . In this episode, we discuss Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS), asset allocation in today's uncertain world, four deep risks, and the cost of income inequality.  

Since 2000, the Bogleheads' have held national conferences in major cities around the country. There are also many Local Chapters in the US and even a few Foreign Chapters that meet regularly. New Chapters are being added on a regular basis. All Bogleheads activities are coordinated by volunteers who contribute their time and talent.  

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Episode 62: Steve Chen on DIY Retirement Planning Tech, host Jon Luskin

Monday Sep 25, 2023

Episode 62: Steve Chen on DIY Retirement Planning Tech, host Jon Luskin

Steven Chen is the founder of NewRetirement, a do-it-yourself tool for retirement planning. Prior to founding NewRetirement, Stephen founded venture-backed companies in education and financial services, and worked with organizations including Charles Schwab, Dimensional Fund Advisors, and Fidelity. 

This episode of the podcast is hosted by Jon Luskin, CFP® , a long-time Boglehead and financial planner. The Bogleheads are a group of like-minded individual investors who follow the general investment and business beliefs of John C. Bogle, founder and former CEO of the Vanguard Group. It is a conflict-free community where individual investors reach out and provide education, assistance, and relevant information to other investors of all experience levels at no cost. The organization supports a free forum at Bogleheads.org , and the wiki site is Bogleheads® wiki . 

This podcast is supported by the John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy , a non-profit organization approved by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) public charity on February 6, 2012. Your tax-deductible donation to the Bogle Center is appreciated.

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The John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. At  Boglecenter.net , your tax-deductible donations are greatly appreciated.

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Episode 61: Cody Garrett on Early Retirement, host Jon Luskin

Monday Aug 28, 2023

Episode 61: Cody Garrett on Early Retirement, host Jon Luskin

Cody Garrett is an advice-only financial planner passionate about helping families refine their path to financial independence (FI) as DIY investors. Cody specializes in comprehensive financial plan development, topic research, and personalized financial education. 

This podcast is supported by the John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy , a non-profit organization approved by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) public charity on February 6, 2012. Your tax-deductible donation to the Bogle Center is appreciated. Show Notes

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  • Bogleheads® Chapter Series – Health care planning for retirement
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  • Bogleheads® Live with Mike Piper: Episode 23
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Episode 60: Jonathan Clements on ”My Money Journey,” host Jon Luskin

Monday Jul 24, 2023

Episode 60: Jonathan Clements on ”My Money Journey,” host Jon Luskin

Jonathan Clements is the founder and editor of HumbleDollar. He’s also the author of a fistful of personal finance books, including My Money Journey and How to Think About Money, and he sits on the advisory board of Creative Planning, one of the country’s largest independent financial advisors.

Jonathan spent almost 20 years at The Wall Street Journal, where he was the newspaper’s personal finance columnist. Between October 1994 and April 2008, he wrote 1,009 columns for the Journal and for The Wall Street Journal Sunday. He then worked for six years at Citigroup, where he was Director of Financial Education for Citi Personal Wealth Management, before returning to the Journal for an additional 15-month stint as a columnist.

An avid bicyclist, Jonathan was born in London, England, and graduated from Cambridge University. He worked for Euromoney magazine in London before moving to the New York area in 1986. He now lives in Philadelphia, close to his daughter, son-in-law and grandson. Prior to joining the Journal in January 1990, he covered mutual funds for Forbes magazine. Jonathan has written a novel and nine personal finance books, and also contributed to six others.

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The John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. At  Boglecenter.net , your tax-deductible donations are greatly appreciated. 

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Episode 059: Dr. William F. Sharpe, host Jon Luskin

Monday Jun 26, 2023

Episode 059: Dr. William F. Sharpe, host Jon Luskin

William F. Sharpe is the STANCO 25 Professor of Finance, Emeritus at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. He was one of the originators of the Capital Asset Pricing Model, developed the Sharpe Ratio for investment performance analysis, and has published articles in a number of professional journals. In 1990, he received the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences.

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Episode 058: Mike Piper on ”More than Enough,” host Jon Luskin

Monday May 29, 2023

Episode 058: Mike Piper on ”More than Enough,” host Jon Luskin

Mike is the author of the popular blog “Oblivious Investor” at ObliviousInvestor.com and the creator of the free Open Social Security calculator at OpenSocialSecurity.com. He is also the author of several books on taxes, investing, and Social Security, and now a new book, More than Enough: A Brief Guide to the Questions That Arise After Realizing You Have More Than You Need .

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Episode 057: Dr. Derek Horstmeyer on multiple investment topics, host Rick Ferri

Thursday Apr 27, 2023

Episode 057: Dr. Derek Horstmeyer on multiple investment topics, host Rick Ferri

Dr. Derek Horstmeyer is a Professor of Finance at George Mason University's School of Business where he publishes regularly on investment topics, ETF & mutual fund performance, and corporate finance. He writes a monthly column for the Wall Street Journal along with his students and writes frequently for the CFA Institute. he has also been published in the Quarterly Journal of Finance, Managerial Finance, and several other mainstream business publications.

Dr. Horstmeyer is very active at GMU outside the classroom. He co-founded and currently leads the first student-managed investment fund and currently serves as director of the new Financial Planning & Wealth Management degree at Mason. 

This podcast is hosted by Rick Ferri, CFA , a long-time Boglehead and investment adviser.  The Bogleheads are a group of like-minded individual investors who follow the general investment and business beliefs of John C. Bogle, founder and former CEO of the Vanguard Group. It is a conflict-free community where individual investors reach out and provide education, assistance, and relevant information to other investors of all experience levels at no cost. The organization supports a free forum at Bogleheads.org , and the wiki site is Bogleheads® wiki . 

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Episode 056: Dr. Daniel Crosby on the behavioral investor, host Rick Ferri

Sunday Mar 26, 2023

Episode 056: Dr. Daniel Crosby on the behavioral investor, host Rick Ferri

Dr. Daniel Crosby is a psychologist and behavioral finance expert who helps organizations and individuals understand the intersection of mind and markets. Educated at Brigham Young and Emory Universities, Dr. Crosby is an international speaker and author who has won many awards for his work.

His first book, Personal Benchmark: Integrating Behavioral Finance and Investment Management , was a New York Times bestseller. His second book, The Laws of Wealth , was named the best investment book of 2017 by the Axiom Business Book Awards and has been translated into Japanese, Chinese, Vietnamese and German. His latest work, The Behavioral Investor , is an in-depth look at how sociology, psychology and neurology all impact investment decision-making. 

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Bogleheads University

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Bogleheads University is a collection of presentations illustrating Bogleheads Principles of Investing which provide a framework for understanding the basics, in addition to coverage of more advanced topics such as Social Security, retirement tax planning and real estate and factor investing.

2023 - Bogleheads 101: Basics

2023 - Bogleheads 501: Advanced

2022 - 10 Core Principles

5 Steps to Take Before You Begin Investing with Christine Benz

Christine Benz discusses how to set savings goals, manage human capital, establish an emergency fund, determine whether to pay down debt or invest, and create a budget. 

The Basics of Investing with Allan Roth

Allan Roth covers key investing concepts, including the relationship between risk and return, the benefits of diversification, active versus passive management, and the pitfalls of market-timing. 

Investment Selection with Rick Ferri

Rick Ferri provides an overview of key investment types and discusses the virtues of using index funds for the core of a portfolio. He also shares the Bogleheads' investing philosophy. 

Introduction to Roth IRA, 401(k), and Other Retirement Accounts with Mike Piper

Mike Piper provides a basic introduction to the rules regarding the most common types of tax-advantaged accounts, such as Roth IRA, traditional IRA, 401(k), HSA, etc.

Setting Your Asset Allocation

Christine Benz discusses the two key factors to bear in mind when setting an asset allocation: risk capacity and risk tolerance. She also shares some case studies of appropriate asset allocations for retirement and non-retirement goals. 

Examples of Asset Allocations: Reasonable and Unreasonable

Jim Dahle shares the characteristics of "reasonable" portfolios, as well as specific examples of reasonable and unreasonable portfolios. 

Minimizing Taxes on Your Investments with Mike Piper

Mike Piper discusses the three most important things you can do to minimize the taxes that you pay on your investment returns.

Investing Basics Q&A

In a session led by Karen Damato, Christine Benz, Mike Piper, and Allan Roth field questions on asset allocation, investment selection, and tax considerations.

Social Security Rules and Strategies with Mary Beth Franklin

Mary Beth Franklin discusses the ways that claiming age, marital status, and earnings affect the amount of Social Security you receive. Franklin also shares claiming strategies to maximize benefits.

Retirement Portfolio Designs with Dana Anspach

Dana Anspach discusses the importance of defining your goals when investing, sequence risk and dollar-weighted returns, and reviews various strategies for investing in retirement – including income ladders and supplementing a portfolio with an annuity.

Roth Conversion and Retirement Tax Planning with Wade Pfau

Wade Pfau shares strategies for minimizing your taxes in retirement, through managing your tax rates and strategic use of Roth conversions.

Dr. Jim Dahle on Real Estate Investing

Jim Dahle discusses the case for (private) real estate, the case for overweighting real estate, and the various types of real estate investments.

The Case for Factor Investing with Paul Merriman

Paul Merriman discusses the past performance of the last 90+ years when investing in small-cap value stocks, examining both absolute return, and relative performance when U.S. large-cap stocks underperformed.

The Case Against Factor Investing with Rick Ferri

Rick Ferri discusses what drives investment portfolio returns (beta), adding factor strategies to a total market portfolio, tracking error from targeting factor premiums, the importance of having a long investment horizon (25+ years), fees (hurdle rate), lack of premiums ex-post, behavioral risk, mean regression and more.

Advanced Q&A at the 2023 Bogleheads Conference

In a session led by Jim Dahle, Dana Anspach, Rick Ferri, Mary Beth Franklin, Paul Merriman and Wade Pfau field questions on social security, real estate, factor investing and retirement tax planning.

Principle 1 - Develop a Workable Plan

Author and White Coat Investor founder Jim Dahle kicks off the first Bogleheads University with an exploration of the first Bogleheads principle: Develop a Workable Plan. He covers the importance of setting financial goals, investing in various investment accounts, and finding an appropriate asset allocation.

Principle 2 - Invest Early and Often

Morningstar director of personal finance Christine Benz tackles Bogleheads Principle #2: Invest Early and Often. She covers the importance of investing as soon as you possibly can - even if that means investing a fairly small sum. She then explores lump-sum investing versus dollar-cost averaging (investing often) - and the pros and cons of each. 

Principle 3 - Never Bear Too Much or Too Little Risk

Financial advisor and author Allan Roth covers Bogleheads Principle #3: Never Bear Too Much or Too Little Risk. He discusses how to select investments that are appropriate given your goals, time horizon, and risk tolerance. 

Principle 4 - Diversify

Morningstar director of personal finance Christine Benz covers Bogleheads Principle #4: Diversify. She explores the advantages of index funds and exchange-traded funds for investors at all life stages, and shares how the 3-fund portfolio (consisting of Total Stock Market, Total International Stock, and Total Bond Market) is exceptionally well diversified. 

Principle 5 - Never Try to Time the Market

Financial advisor and author Rick Ferri tackles Bogleheads Principle #5: Don't Try to Time the Market. He shares data showing how investors often hurt their results with poor timing decisions and discusses how investors can put in place a plan that requires relatively little ongoing maintenance. 

Principle 6 - Use Index Funds When Possible

Financial advisor and author Rick Ferri discusses Bogleheads Principle #6: Use Index Funds When Possible. He shares data pointing to the performance edge that index funds hold in most major categories and the risks that investors court by emphasizing actively managed funds. 

Principle 7 - Keep Costs Low

Financial advisor and author Allan Roth tackles Bogleheads Principle #7: Keep Costs Low. He discusses the gamut of costs that investors pay: expense ratios for their funds, transaction costs, advice costs, tax costs, and the cost of poor timing decisions. 

Principle 8 - Minimize Taxes

Tax and Social Security expert Mike Piper covers Bogleheads Principle #8: Minimize Taxes. He shares key ways to minimize investment-related taxes, including maximizing contributions to tax-sheltered accounts, investing tax-efficiently within taxable accounts, and paying attention to "asset location." 

Principle 9 - Invest with Simplicity

Tax and Social Security expert Mike Piper tackles Bogleheads Principle #9: Invest with Simplicity. He discusses how investors in multi-asset funds often do a better job of capturing their funds' returns than in investors in other fund types. 

Principle 10 - Stay the Course

Author and White Coat Investor founder Jim Dahle discusses Bogleheads Principle #10: Stay the Course. He looks at how investors can undermine their own results with too-frequent buying and selling, including chasing hot performers. 

Q&A with the five faculty members

Bogleheads University "faculty members" tackle attendee questions. They discuss investing in an inflationary environment, setting up bucket portfolios for retirement, lump sum versus dollar-cost averaging, and potential undervaluation in non-U.S. stocks. The panel discussion includes Christine Benz, Jim Dahle, Rick Ferri, Mike Piper, and Allan Roth. 

ORGANIZATION, MISSION, VISION, VALUES

The John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving financial literacy. We were approved by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) public charity on February 6, 2012. The approval was retroactive to November 22, 2010, the date of the organization's incorporation as a non-profit Texas Corporation.

To expand John C. Bogle's legacy by promoting the principles of successful investing and financial well-being through education and community.

Create a world of well-informed, capable, and empowered investors.

  • Commitment to and focus on the investment philosophy of John C. Bogle.
  • Community: The maintenance and expansion of the well-established Boglehead sense of community and belonging.
  • Fairness: That investment companies should treat investors equitably so that investors receive their fair share of investment returns.
  • Focus: Highlighting quantitative evidence-based research .
  • Simplicity: That investing can and should be simple.
  • Stewardship: Advocating for and supporting servant leadership dedicated to the benefit of investors.

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The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing Paperback – September 28, 2007

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Praise for The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing

"If you master the concepts laid out in this book, you'll do very well." —Reuters News

"Kindness, integrity, and common sense can be scarce on Wall Street, but the Bogleheads have each in abundance. Reading The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing is like learning investing from your grandfather. There's a lifetime of wisdom packed into these pages, coupled with a sincere desire to help investors meet their goals. Jack Bogle will be proud!" —Don Phillips, Managing Director, Morningstar

"The Vanguard Diehards—a.k.a. the 'Bogleheads'—are easily the planet's most well-informed, congenial, and successful group of individual investors. At long last, they're letting the general public in on their solutions, their secrets, and their strategies. If you're about to retire, are planning to retire, or are even thinking of retiring, you can't afford not to read this book." —William J. Bernstein, cofounder, Efficient Frontier Advisors, LLC author of The Intelligent Asset Allocator and The Four Pillars of Investing

"More than thirty years ago John Bogle started a war in the mutual fund industry. His weapon was low fees, and his shield was common sense. In this book, three ardent followers sagely outline Bogle's approach that has benefited millions and will benefit millions more." —Richard Ferri, CFA, President, Portfolio Solutions LLC author of The ETF Book: All You Need to Know About Exchange-Traded Funds (Wiley/December 2007)

"Those investors who have the courage, discipline, and wisdom to follow the sound financial and investment strategies of The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing are virtually certain to achieve results superior to not only the vast majority of individual investors, but the vast majority of professionals as well. What is perhaps more important is that the quality of their lives will be improved because they will have more time to spend on the really important things in their lives." —Larry Swedroe, author of The Only Guide to a Winning Investment Strategy You'll Ever Need

About the Author

Taylor Larimore, Mel Lindauer, and Michael LeBoeuf are three millionaires who met online and combined their investing experience and efforts to help others. The authors have contributed over 40,000 posts on the Diehards and Bogleheads forums. You can read more about each of them in "About the Authors" on page 293.

  • Print length 336 pages
  • Language English
  • Publisher Wiley
  • Publication date September 28, 2007
  • Dimensions 6 x 0.93 x 9 inches
  • ISBN-10 0470067365
  • ISBN-13 978-0470067369
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  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Wiley; 1st edition (September 28, 2007)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 336 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0470067365
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0470067369
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 14.1 ounces
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 6 x 0.93 x 9 inches
  • #789 in Retirement Planning (Books)
  • #1,661 in Introduction to Investing
  • #6,628 in Economics (Books)

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About the author

Mel lindauer.

A former Forbes.com columnist, Mel Lindauer, CFS, WMS, was dubbed "The Prince of the Bogleheads" by Jack Bogle, the founder of Vanguard. He established The John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy and served as its President for 10 years. He's a moderator and leader of the Bogleheads forum at bogleheads.org and of its predecessor forum at Morningstar.com. He's made more than 50,000 posts on these two forums.

A Marine veteran, he started investing in the late '60s and has first-hand experience with both bull and bear markets. Together with co-author Taylor Larimore, he initiated and continued to organize the grassroots Bogleheads annual Conferences for 20 years.

He's been quoted in a number of newspapers and national magazines, including the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Money, US News & World Report, Investment News, The Miami Herald, the Philadelphia Inquirer and the Daytona Beach News-Journal. He's also appeared on CNN-fn. In March of 2012, he was honored by Money Magazine as one of its "Everyday Heroes" for his work in investor education.

Retired since 1997, he was the founder and former CEO of a successful graphic arts company in the Philadelphia area for 30 years. Since retirement, he's earned credentials as a Certified Fund Specialist from the Institute of Business and Finance and as a Wealth Management Specialist from Kaplan College.

He was elected to the Daytona Beach Shores FL City Council in 2016, was re-elected in 2018, and was elected as Vice Mayor in 2020.

He also holds commercial pilot and flight instructor licenses, and was commissioned a Kentucky Colonel by the Governor of his former home state of Kentucky.

He attended Delaware County Community College and Temple University and earned his degree in Business Management.

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Vital Dollar

The Bogleheads Guide to Investing

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Bogleheads guide to investing

If you’re considering starting investing or want to explore different strategies, you may have come across the term “Bogleheads Investing.” While this may seem a little daunting, in our Bogleheads guide to investing, we’ll break down this approach and its strategies to help you decide if it is a good choice for you. 

Who are the Bogleheads?

Bogleheads Guide to Investing forum

The term “Bogleheads” was developed to honor Vanguard founder, John Bogle. This group of investment enthusiasts embrace certain investment strategies and philosophies, sharing their opinions and practical advice on the Bogleheads forum. This forum has more than 120,000 members and there are threads on theories, techniques, financial news and more.

In fact, there are almost 2,000 new posts on the forum every day, providing a great resource for experienced traders to discuss the merits of various strategies and newbie investors who need help developing their portfolios. 

What are the Bogleheads Investment Strategies?

The Bogleheads Own Investment Strategy

There are several simple philosophies that steer the Bogleheads guide to investing to help you achieve financial freedom . These include:

Live Below Means: This simply refers to spending less than you earn. If you can adopt a frugal lifestyle and live below the amount you earn, you can save the rest for your investment goals.

Invest Regularly and Early: Bogleheads have the opinion that it is never too early to get started on your investment journey. In fact, the earlier that you can start, the better financial position you can put yourself in. 

Balance Risk: Investing is risky, but there is a balance between taking on too much or accepting too little. While you don’t want to lose money, you also want to get decent returns. 

Prioritize Diversification: Diversity is crucial to achieving the desired returns. It is never a good idea to have all of your eggs in one basket. Bogleheads encourage mixing things up with bonds, stocks and other asset classes. 

Invest for the Long Term: Many investors try to time the market, taking advantage of when it is at the top or bottom. However, this can be exceptionally risky, so Bogleheads recommend investing for the long term. 

Utilize Index Funds: Index funds can be a superb diversification tool. There are even index funds that allow you to buy the total stock market . When you are looking at low-cost diversification tools, you need to use index funds. 

Keep Your Costs Low: Fees are one of the downsides to investing , and with the wrong choice of platform, fees can quickly offset any investment gains. An important philosophy of Bogleheads is to keep your costs low, watching out for advisor fees and investing in low-cost funds. 

Minimize Your Tax Burden: Another area where you can lose some of your investing profits is through taxation. So, you should ensure that you take advantage of any tax-deferred investment tools, such as a 401k or IRA.

Focus on Simplicity: Simplicity is crucial for Bogleheads. These investors take the approach that the more complex you make your investing, the harder it will be to manage. Bogleheads prefer to pick a few funds and keep accounts together to make investing simple. 

Stay on Course: The stock market will go up and down, but you need to keep investing for the long term. Avoid falling for the panic and stay on course.

The two most well-known strategies that encompass all of the above philosophies are the Bogleheads 3 fund portfolio and the 4 fund portfolio. Both of these strategies are designed to be simple, but as the names suggest, they differ in the funds used.

The Bogleheads 3 fund portfolio involves investing in three types of index funds, a U.S. total stock market, an international stock market and a U.S. total bond market. All of these types of funds allow access to the whole market for a low-cost, simple diversified investing strategy. The aim of this is to potentially capture the long-term growth of both the stock and bond markets, while the risks associated with investing in individual assets are reduced. 

The Bogleheads 4 fund portfolio adds a total international bond market index fund into the mix to provide exposure to the global bonds market. The goal of this strategy is to provide even greater diversification for long-term growth and a reduced impact on expenses. 

Is there an Official Bogleheads Guide to Investing?

The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing book

Yes, there is an official “The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing,” written by Boglehead founder Taylor Larimore, along with forum leaders, Mel Lindauer and Michael LeBoeuf. This guide breaks down the principles of Bogleheads investing. 

However, you don’t necessarily need a book to adopt the Bogleheads approach. There is a full forum and an official website, which are packed with helpful information and advice. The forum even has investing start-up kit discussions, breaking down everything you will need for beginners , retirement and more. This means that you can assess the Bogleheads approach and determine if the strategies are something you would like to try without needing to spend money. 

The Pros and Cons of Bogleheads Investing

As with any financial strategy, there are both positives and negatives associated with Bogleheads investing. It is important to be aware of the pros and potential cons before you make any investing decisions.

Simple Approach: If you’re new to investing or lack the time to oversee a complex investment portfolio, the Bogleheads investing approach is likely to appeal to you. The strategies focus on keeping things simple to minimize fees, management and complexity.

Minimal Fees: Another key of the Bogleheads approach is to minimize fees. No one enjoys paying fees and taxes, so if you adhere to the Bogleheads principles, you can minimize your burden to ensure that more of your money is put to work. 

Long-Term Strategies: The Bogleheads techniques are designed to offer solid returns and investment success across the long term.

Simple Indexing isn’t Foolproof: While simple indexing of stocks and bonds can be highly effective, there are occasions when it doesn’t work so well, so market timing is crucial. For example, in 2008 and 2022 when the stock market suffered a collapse, these types of index funds were badly hit. Simple indexing can leave you vulnerable when stocks are falling and bonds don’t provide sufficient defensive coverage. 

Playing it Safe: One of the messages of Bogleheads is to balance risk, but sometimes taking a full market approach is a little like playing it safe, working with averages rather than the highs and lows. However, with bigger risks comes the potential for bigger rewards that may not be possible if you’re a Boglehead. 

Fee Obsession: While we all want to pay as little as possible in fees and charges, becoming a Boglehead may lead to a little fee obsession. You need to be careful to ensure that you are not choosing an inferior product because you are worried about nickels and dimes. 

The Bogleheads Guide to Investing FAQs

Do you have to follow a particular boglehead strategy.

No, you can embrace the Boglehead approach to investing without following a particular three fund or four fund portfolio. However, you will need to ensure that your strategy meets the Boglehead principles that we covered earlier in this article. 

Do you have to invest with Vanguard?

This may seem a little controversial since Jack Bogle, the namesake of the movement, founded Vanguard. For this reason, there are many Bogleheads who would never deviate from investing with Vanguard funds, particularly since Vanguard has some of the best funds and ETFs . However, there is no hard and fast rule that you need to stick to Vanguard. There are a number of other companies that offer highly competitive funds. 

If you’re looking for help deciding the best investment strategy for a sound financial lifestyle, Bogleheads investing does hold some appeal. You can either follow the three fund or four fund portfolio strategies or develop your own ideas adhering to the Bogleheads principles. This can provide a long-term strategy for reliable returns with minimal management, minimal fees and balanced risk. 

However, there are some drawbacks to the Bogleheads approach and it may not be the best fit for everyone. So, it is important to assess your own investment goals, and preferences to see if embracing a Boglehead investing mindset would help you achieve your aims. 

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Should I remove college age son as dependent so that he can get EV credit?

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Re: Should I remove college age son as dependent so that he can get EV credit?

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SRenaeP wrote: ↑ Sat Jan 06, 2024 10:47 pm It likely won't make difference. When he files his tax return, the question that is asked is if someone *can* claim him as a dependent. The answer to that question will be the same whether or not you actually claim him as a dependent on your return.
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What is the bogleheads guide to investing.

bogleheads personal investing

What is the Bogleheads Guide to Investing?

Welcome to The Bogleheads Guide to Investing.  In this Blog we’ll cover the top 10 investing principles of Bogleheads.  T hese principles are based on patience, discipline, and the power of compounding interest.  They are designed to help investors achieve their financial goals over the long term.

Before you jump into buying stocks and bonds, invest time into your PLAN upfront.  Now, let’s break down each of these principles including how I’ve applied them to my investing success.

The AssetRise community is built upon the Bogleheads investment fundamentals below.  AssetRise Portfolio Management is designed specifically to manage, track, and optimize Vanguard Boglehead portfolios.

Bogleheads Investing Principles

Workable plan.

A workable plan is a comprehensive financial plan that is tailored to your financial goals and risk tolerance. It should include a budget, an emergency fund, and a retirement plan. The plan should be reviewed and updated regularly to ensure that it remains relevant.

Each Boglehead develops a unique plan called an IPS.  An Investment policy statement (IPS)  is a statement that defines your general investment goals and objectives. It describes the strategies that you will use to meet these objectives, and contains specific information on subjects such as  asset allocation ,  risk tolerance, and liquidity requirements. 

The first step in investing as a Boglehead is to write down your IPS then stick to it.  This will be critical as you navidate the highs and lows of investing.

Here is an IPS example for you to use

Too many investors fail since they have no plan.  They simply jump into buying the latest stock or chase past performance.  Nobody can predict the future, so build you plan and stick to it.

Invest Early and Often

Once you have a regular savings pattern, you can begin accumulating financial wealth. How much saving is enough? For retirement, 20% of income may be a good starting point, but this will vary widely from person to person. If you want to be retire before age 65, or plan to leave significant assets to charity or to children, you probably need to save even more.  Starting a regular savings plan early in life is important because investment returns compound over a longer period. 

The image below demonstrates the benefit of starting early.

File:Young early.jpg

The best way to save money is to arrange automatic deductions from your paycheck. Many  401(k)s  offer this. When you invest in an  IRA  or taxable account, choose a provider that will automatically deduct money from your bank account the day after pay day. This is described as “paying yourself first,” and it goes a long way towards establishing and reinforcing reasonable spending habits.

There are  guidelines  for which accounts you should fund and in what order. But always remember, you first need to save the money. When you start, saving regularly is more important than your choice of investments.  

Bearing Risk

Your risk tolerance is your ability to stick to an investment plan through difficult financial and market conditions. To know if an asset allocation matches your risk tolerance, ask yourself if you held it, would you sell during the next bear market? This is very hard to answer honestly before you have experienced one.

In Bogleheads investing philosophy, it’s important to invest in a way that is appropriate for your financial situation and goals . This means that you should never bear too much or too little risk. Investing too conservatively can result in lower returns, while investing too aggressively can lead to higher risk and potential losses.

To determine the appropriate level of risk for your investments, you should consider your financial goals, time horizon, and risk tolerance. If you’re investing for a long-term goal, such as retirement, you may be able to tolerate more risk than if you’re investing for a short-term goal, such as a down payment on a house. It’s important to find a balance between risk and reward that is appropriate for your individual situation.

To give you enough money for retirement, you want assets with a decent expected return. This means you need to own  stocks . Stocks return a share of the profits generated by publicly owned companies. But although they offer a chance of good returns, stocks are volatile and risky. In 2008, some markets fell 50% from their previous highs. Over time, stock prices roughly follow the trend of the economy, which is to grow. But prices can stagnate or decline for decade-long periods. This is why your  asset allocation needs to include bonds as well as stocks.  Boglehead philosophy is to buy stocks in a well diversified, low cost Index Fund. 

The most popular stock fund is the Vanduard VTI ETF: Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund ETF consisting of over 3,000 U.S. stocks.

Bonds are a promise to pay back a loan of money on a set schedule. Bonds do not have the expected returns of stocks, but they are much less volatile. A mix of stocks and bonds will produce reasonable growth while limiting the size of the inevitable drops.  How much in bonds? This is the basic question of asset allocation. Before you decide, you first need to balance your ability, willingness, and need to take  risk . The more risk you can handle, the less bonds you need. When you are young, your prime earning years lie ahead, and it will be decades before you need to access the money. So, higher stock allocations may be suitable, because big drops in stock prices will not hurt as long as you do not sell during the drop.

John Bogle  wrote: [2]

[A]s we age, we usually have (1) more wealth to protect, (2) less time to recoup severe losses, (3) greater need for income, and (4) perhaps an increased nervousness as markets jump around. All four of these factors suggest more bonds as we age. —  Common Sense on Mutual Funds , John Bogle

Although your exact asset allocation should depend on your goals for the money, there are a few general guidelines that you can follow. These are based on practice rather than on theory, and are only a starting point for decision making, not the end.

For example,  Benjamin Graham  wrote: [3]

We have suggested as a fundamental guiding rule that the investor should never have less than 25% or more than 75% of his funds in common stocks, with a consequence inverse range of 75% to 25% in bonds. There is an implication here that the standard division should be an equal one, or 50-50, between the two major investment mediums. —  Quoted in  The Intelligent Investor , Jason Zweig

Alternatively,  John Bogle  recommends “ roughly your age in bonds “. For instance, if you are 45, 45% of your portfolio should be in high-quality bonds. He describes the idea as just “ a crude starting point ” which “ [c]learly … must be adjusted to reflect an investor’s objectives, risk tolerance, and overall financial position “. He also suggests that you should treat any national or state retirement income you might receive as if it is a bond, setting its assumed value appropriately.

This “ age in bonds ” and its variants, age minus ten years or age minus twenty years, are only approximate starting points. You will probably want to adjust them to fit your circumstances. For example, if you have a guaranteed state or other pension, this changes both your need and your willingness to take risk. Some investors do not add pensions and Social Security to their asset allocation of bond holdings.

It is easy to underestimate risk and to overestimate your tolerance for risk. In 2008, many people learned too late that they should have been holding more bonds. Think carefully before choosing an asset allocation with high stock market allocations. If you have not been through a major market downturn before, your abstract logical thoughts about risk can quickly become emotional ones. The developing field of neuroeconomics explains how mental traits and emotional effects that work well in other areas undermine our ability to deal rationally with markets and investing.

You should generally own bond funds  instead of individual bonds , for convenience and diversification. Using individual  corporate  or  municipal  bonds require a very large holding in order to achieve the broad diversification and increased safety of a bond fund. The high number of different bonds in bond funds lets you ignore the risk of any one bond defaulting. You can manage  Interest rate risk  by choosing funds with short and intermediate-term  duration , and  default risk  by choosing funds with high credit ratings. The idea here is for your bond holdings to reduce violent up and down swings in overall portfolio value. You want your risks on the equity side, not the bond side.

The most popular Bogleheads bond fund is the ETF BND: Vanguard Total Bond Market for its low cost and diversification.

Never Try to Time the Market

According to the Bogleheads investing philosophy, it’s important to avoid trying to time the market.  This means that investors should not attempt to predict the market’s ups and downs and make investment decisions based on those predictions. Instead, investors should focus on creating a well-diversified portfolio that is appropriate for their financial situation and goals.

The Bogleheads believe that trying to time the market is a losing proposition because it’s impossible to predict the future direction of the market with any degree of accuracy.  Instead, investors should focus on the long-term and remain disciplined in their approach. By investing regularly and staying the course, investors can achieve their financial goals over the long term.

Check out this article: Vanguard S&P 500 ETF VOO outperforms actively managed funds 11 consecutive years.

Use Index Funds When Possible

According to the Bogleheads investing philosophy, it’s recommended to use index funds when possible.  Why use Indx Funds vs. Individual Stocks?  Index funds are low-cost and provide broad market exposure.  They are designed to track the performance of a specific market index, such as the S&P 500, and are passively managed. This means that they have lower fees than actively managed funds, which can help to keep investment costs low.

The Bogleheads believe that using index funds is a simple and effective way to build a diversified portfolio that is appropriate for your financial situation and goals.  By investing in index funds, you can gain exposure to a wide range of stocks or bonds with minimal effort. This can help to reduce risk and increase returns over the long term.

The 5 most common Index Funds used by Bogleheads are:

  • VTI: Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund ETF
  • VXUS: Vanguard Total International Stock Index Fund ETF
  • BND: Vanguard Total Bond Market Index Fund ETF
  • VNQ: Vanguard Real Estate Index Fund ETF
  • VOO: Vanguard 500 Index Fund ETF  

Learn more about how to structure your portfolio by using an Investment Portfolio Asset Allocation strateg y.

Keep Costs Low

According to the Bogleheads investing philosophy, it’s important to keep costs low when investing . This means that investors should avoid high-fee funds and unnecessary trading. By minimizing investment costs, investors can keep more of their returns and achieve their financial goals over the long term.

The Bogleheads believe that using low-cost index funds is an effective way to keep investment costs low . Index funds are passively managed and have lower fees than actively managed funds. This can help to reduce investment costs and increase returns over the long term.

According to the Bogleheads investing philosophy, diversification is a crucial component of a successful investment strategy.  The Bogleheads recommend spreading your investments across different asset classes to reduce risk. This means investing in a variety of stocks, bonds, and other securities.

The Bogleheads believe that diversification can help to reduce risk and increase returns over the long term.  By investing in a variety of asset classes, you can reduce the impact of any one investment on your overall portfolio. This can help to minimize the impact of market volatility and reduce the risk of significant losses.

Minimize Taxes

According to the Bogleheads investing philosophy, minimizing taxes is an important aspect of a successful investment strategy.  Here are some ways to minimize investment-related taxes:

  • Maximize contributions to tax-sheltered accounts: Contributing to tax-sheltered accounts such as 401(k)s, IRAs, and HSAs can help to reduce your taxable income and lower your tax bill.
  • Invest tax-efficiently within taxable accounts: By investing in tax-efficient funds and holding them for the long term, you can minimize the amount of taxes you owe on your investments.
  • Pay attention to “asset location”: By placing tax-inefficient assets such as bonds in tax-sheltered accounts and tax-efficient assets such as stocks in taxable accounts, you can further reduce your tax bill.
  • “Back Door Roth”: Use Traditional IRA to fund the Roth IRA one time per account annually.

Invest with Simplicity

The Bogleheads believe that keeping your investment strategy simple and easy to understand can help you stay disciplined and avoid making impulsive decisions based on short-term market movements.

One way to invest with simplicity is to create a three-fund portfolio that includes a total stock market index fund such as VTI, a total international stock index fund such as VXUS, and a total bond market fund such as BND.  This approach is designed to provide broad market exposure while keeping investment costs low. 

By investing with simplicity, you can avoid the complexity and confusion that can come with more complicated investment strategies. This can help you stay focused on your long-term financial goals and achieve success over the long term.

For seasoned investors this level of simplicity will seem counterintuitive.  However the data shows that a simple portfolio of low cost ETF Indes will outperform a stock pickers portfolio over the long term.  

And…Stay the Course!

Look, investing is a very empotional game as you are playing with your hard earned savings.  Bogleheads believe that its critical that investors should stick to their investment plan and avoid making impulsive decisions based on short-term market movements.

The Bogleheads believe that staying the course is important because it helps investors avoid the temptation to buy and sell based on emotions rather than logic.  By remaining disciplined and focused on their long-term financial goals, investors can achieve success over the long term.

Wrapping it Up

I’ve been a Boglehead investor for over 10 years, by following these principles I have grown significant wealth over time.  I’m very fortunate to have discovered the Boglehead investing principles at a young age after trying 2 failed investment advisors.

While you don’t need to put 100% of your investments into a Bogleheads portfolio, I hope you consider adding your “core” investments into it.  You will be thankful over time.

Michael

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10 2024 Stock Picks From An Investing Expert

These 2024 stock picks have the potential to beat the market over the next 12 months.

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Before we get to my 2024 stock picks, let's first recap the performance of my annual list of 10 stock selections for 2023. These delivered a positive return in a tumultuous year, but the benchmark S&P 500 Index did better: up 13.1% roughly a year since we published, compared with my collection's 7.9%. 

Still, for the past decade the average performance of my list was an annual gain of roughly 13%, including dividends, compared with less than 12% for the S&P. (Returns throughout the story are through October 31; my 2024 stock picks are in bold.)

Stocks go up and down, but they have proven to be fabulous investments over the long run. Between the start of 1957, when the S&P 500 assumed its current size and form, through October, the index has returned an annual average of 10.2%. No guarantees, of course, but at that rate, your original investment doubles in about seven years. At the end of 30 years, $100,000 becomes $1.6 million. 

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Through the genius of modern finance, you can now stash your nest egg in an S&P 500 index fund and do awfully well in the long term. So why pick stocks? As I've shown over the past decade and more, you might do better. Also, you'll be engaging in an exercise that millions of people find intellectually stimulating, fun and, unlike other forms of diversion, profitable. Picking stocks is not for everyone, but my guess is that it's for you – otherwise you wouldn't be reading this. 

My 2024 stock picks

Annually since 1993, I have offered a list of the best stocks to buy for the year ahead. I select nine from the broader choices of experts that I trust, and I include one of my own. The best performer for 2023 was Nu Holdings (NU), a Latin American fintech company whose shares had recently been added to Warren Buffett 's Berkshire Hathaway equity portfolio . Nu returned a juicy 68%. 

According to tradition, Buffett, as the top picker, gets the first choice for the upcoming year. Among his new purchases in 2023 were three home-building stocks: D.H. Horton (DHI), Lennar (LEN) and my own favorite, NVR (NVR), which serves the Mid Atlantic, Midwest and South. High interest rates have knocked NVR off its peak, but with resale inventory tight (owners hesitate to sell if it means giving up a cheap mortgage), sales of new homes continue to rise. 

Another leading performer last year was Lululemon Athletica (LULU), chosen from the holdings of Fidelity Growth Company fund, which has a stellar record. Steve Wymer , manager for the past 27 years, has lately been buying more shares of Tesla (TSLA), a stock he has owned since 2011. The future of mobility is clearly electric, and Tesla has a huge edge over the legacy automakers. The price is right: down nearly $100 from its mid-summer peak.

In his first appearance on my list, Tobias Fabian Mueller , the manager of the T. Rowe Price European Stock fund, was a big winner last year with LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMUY), the luxury goods conglomerate. The fund, like the continent, has been sluggish for a decade, but the portfolio has some attractive assets, such as ASML Holding (ASML), a Dutch company with a monopoly on the technology used to mass-produce advanced semiconductors. After soaring, share prices have dropped considerably in the past two years, offering a good entry point.

Terry Tillman, the Truist Securities software analyst, was far and away my best source of big winners for nearly a decade. But he has had three tough years in a row. For 2024, I'm trying something different: going with a stock that Tillman rated Buy immediately after an initial public offering ( IPO ) in September. It's Klaviyo (KVYO), a marketing platform that sends personalized e-mails to customers. Klaviyo is a young company with fast-rising revenues. 

At the end of last year, Parnassus Endeavor changed its name to Value Equity , which is a good description of its orientation. The fund's pick last year, Merck (MRK), was a mediocre performer. This year, I am going with one of the fund's top 10 holdings, Bank of America (BAC). There's still considerable risk that consumers and businesses will cause loan losses for the bank if the economy goes into recession , but if the yield curve reverts to its traditional configuration, Bank of America can make rich profits by borrowing short term and lending long term. 

In a sector that has performed poorly, Oberweis Micro-Cap is a standout, outpacing the typical small-company fund by an average of eight percentage points over each of the past five years. One of the fund's top holdings is Blue Bird (BLBD), a school bus manufacturer with a market capitalization (price times shares outstanding) of just $600 million. Recently, the company delivered its 1,500th electric bus – a category that could bring burgeoning profits as school districts convert their fleets. 

Amazon.com (AMZN), the online retail giant, carries a forward price-earnings ratio of 40-plus, based on analysts' profit forecasts for 2024. But Alibaba Group Holding (BABA), its China-based analogue, has a P/E in the single digits. The comparison is far from exact, but Alibaba is definitely cheap, and the main reason is the political risk created by the animosity between the U.S. and China. Shares have fallen by more than two-thirds in three years, and my guess is that all the risk (and more) is already reflected in the price. Alibaba is the number-one holding of Matthews China , managed by an excellent team of Asia specialists. 

Few stocks are given the top ranking ("1") for both timeliness and safety by the Value Line Investment Survey , and I usually choose one for my list each year. For 2024, it's Brown & Brown (BRO), an 85-year-old Florida-based property and casualty insurer that also manages health claims. The mid-cap stock's earnings have risen in what I like to call a beautiful line, year after year. So has the share price, but it's still reasonable.

ARK Innovation , the tech-focused exchange-traded fund, has had its ups and downs (gaining 153% in 2020, losing 67% in 2022), but manager Cathie Wood has lots of good ideas. One is DraftKings (DKNG), the online gaming company, which has gained 75% over the past year. Competition is intense, but this is one of the great businesses of the future. Revenues are soaring, but be aware that the company still loses money. 

My own choice last year, Alphabet, the former Google, was the second-best performer on the 2023 list. For 2024, I'm picking a stock that has been kind to my own portfolio, ONEOK (OKE), the well-managed Oklahoma-based natural gas pipeline and processing company. Natural gas exports are booming, and the fuel will be essential domestically – as a complement to solar and wind – to run the power plants that make electric vehicles run.

Some warnings: I project these stocks will beat the market in the coming 12 months, but I don't advise buying stocks unless you intend to hold them for at least five years. Supplement my brief descriptions with your own research, and please diversify. Happy hunting!

James K. Glassman chairs Glassman Advisory, a public-affairs consulting firm. He does not write about his clients. His most recent book is Safety Net: The Strategy for DeRisking Your Investments in a Time of Turbulence . Of the stocks recommended, he owns NVR, Tesla and ONEOK. You can reach him at [email protected].

Note: This item first appeared in Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine, a monthly, trustworthy source of advice and guidance. Subscribe to help you make more money and keep more of the money you make here .

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  • Today’s best CD rates

CD rate trends: 2023 vs. 2024

Reasons to open a cd now, what to consider when choosing a cd, methodology.

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Today’s Best CD Rates, Jan. 3, 2024: APYs Up to 5.55% Ring in the New Year

Cd rates dipped in 2023. here’s where they’re heading in 2024..

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Kelly is an editor for CNET Money focusing on banking. She has over 10 years of experience in personal finance and previously wrote for CBS MoneyWatch covering banking, investing, insurance and home equity products. She is passionate about arming consumers with the tools they need to take control of their financial lives. In her free time, she enjoys binging podcasts, scouring thrift stores for unique home décor and spoiling the heck out of her dogs.

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Courtney Johnston is a senior editor leading the CNET Money team. Passionate about financial literacy and inclusion, she has a decade of experience as a freelance journalist covering policy, financial news, real estate and investing. A New Jersey native, she graduated with an M.A. in English Literature and Professional Writing from the University of Indianapolis, where she also worked as a graduate writing instructor.

If you want to grow your savings faster , one of your first New Year’s resolutions should be to consider opening a CD. After over a year and a half of increases, CD rates finally peaked in the last months of 2023, with many banks lowering rates across multiple CD terms. And while annual percentage yields, or APYs, remain high going into 2024, experts predict we’ll see further drops as the year goes on.

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Your CD rate is locked in when you open the account. By opening an account now, you can secure an APY up to 5.55% -- roughly three times the national average . And that rate will stay the same even if overall APYs continue to go down. Read on to learn more about where rates have been, where they’re heading and how much you can earn today.

Experts recommend comparing rates before opening a CD account to get the best APY possible. Enter your information below to get CNET’s partners’ best rate for your area.

Today’s best CD rates

Here are some of the top CD rates available right now and how much you could earn if you deposited $5,000 today:

CD rates rose steadily from March 2022 through the end of 2023 in response to the Federal Reserve’s regular rate hikes. The federal funds rate affects how much it costs banks to borrow and lend money to each other. So, when the Fed raises the federal funds rate, banks often follow suit, raising interest rates on consumer products like credit cards, loans and savings products to attract more customers and boost their cash reserves.

As inflation inches closer to the Fed’s 2% target, the last three FOMC meetings resulted in rate hike pauses . In response, banks have slowly dropped their rates across CD terms. Here’s where APYs stand compared to last month:

This may not seem like a drastic decrease overall, but when we look at individual CD rates, we see that earning potential has decreased more markedly. Here’s how the top rates compare for the same period:

CD interest is compounded , which means you earn interest not only on your principal balance but also on the interest you’ve earned to date. So, even a small decrease in APY can make a big difference over time when it comes to how much money you can earn.

The best way to protect yourself from anticipated future rate drops is to lock in a great APY now. But a fixed rate of return isn’t the only perk of opening a CD today.

CDs held by FDIC-insured banks or NCUA-insured credit unions are protected by federal deposit insurance up to $250,000 per person, per institution if the bank fails. This makes them a low-risk way to grow your savings. Plus, early withdrawal penalties can discourage you from dipping into your funds before you need them. Most banks charge a penalty if you withdraw money before the CD matures.

In addition to a competitive APY, you should also consider the following when comparing CD accounts:

  • How soon you’ll need the funds: Early withdrawal penalties can chip away at your interest earnings. So, be sure to choose a term that fits your savings timeline.
  • Minimum deposit requirement: Some CDs require a certain amount to open an account -- typically, $500 to $1,000. Others have no minimum deposit requirement. How much money you have to put away can help you narrow down your account options.
  • Fees: Fees can erode your balance. Many online banks don’t charge maintenance fees. They have lower overhead costs than banks with physical branches, and they pass these savings down to consumers through higher rates and fewer fees. Still, be sure to read the fine print for any account you’re considering.
  • Federal deposit insurance: Confirm that any institution you’re considering is an FDIC or NCUA member to ensure your money is protected in the event of a bank failure.
  • Customer ratings: Read customer reviews and ratings on sites like Trustpilot to make sure the bank is responsive, professional and easy to work with.

CNET reviews CD rates based on the latest APY information from issuer websites. We evaluated CD rates from more than 50 banks, credit unions and financial companies. We evaluate CDs based on APYs, product offerings, accessibility and customer service.

The current banks included in CNET’s weekly CD averages are: Alliant Credit Union, Ally Bank, American Express National Bank, Barclays, Bask Bank, Bread Savings, Capital One, CFG Bank, CIT, Fulbright, Marcus by Goldman Sachs, MYSB Direct, Quontic, Rising Bank, Synchrony, EverBank, Popular Bank, First Internet Bank of Indiana, America First Federal Credit Union, CommunityWide Federal Credit Union, Discover, Bethpage, BMO Alto, Limelight Bank, First National Bank of America, Connexus Credit Union.

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7 pieces of good investment advice to follow

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When you start investing, you’re bound to get a lot of advice. It can be hard to parse through it all, and figure out what information works for you and your situation.

The stock market is volatile, but certain tried-and-true investment principles can help you boost your chance for long-term success. In this article, we’ll discuss good pieces of investment advice, along with how to find help if you need it.

Need expert guidance when it comes to managing your money or planning for retirement? Bankrate’s AdvisorMatch can connect you to a CFP® professional to help you achieve your financial goals.

What is investment advice?

Investment advice is practical guidance provided by financial professionals. It typically involves offering recommendations on investment products as well as advice on how to allocate funds within your portfolio. The aim is to optimize returns and manage risk in alignment with your specific financial goals.

Investment advice looks different for everyone. What works for one investor may not make sense for someone else. But if you’re just getting started, it’s smart to familiarize yourself with the most common investing recommendations from experts.

1. Build your financial foundation first

Before you start investing, it’s important to sit down and get a handle on your entire financial picture.

Here are two essential steps to take before you put money in the stock market:

  • Build an emergency fund : Most experts recommend saving at least three to six months worth of living expenses in a cash account for easy access. This money will act as a cushion if something unexpected arises, like a sudden job loss or costly car repairs. Consider stashing your emergency fund in a high-yield savings account to take advantage of high interest rates.
  • Pay off high-interest credit card debt: Credit card interest rates are well over 20 percent, so if you’re carrying a balance on your card, you’re racking up tons of money in extra charges each month. Work to pay down your balance as quickly as possible. Otherwise, any gains in your investment portfolio will be offset by the debt you’re accumulating on your card. Set up a debt payoff plan and consider using a debt management strategy, such as the snowball method or avalanche method.

2. Invest in your company’s 401(k) — and get the match

Experts often recommend starting your investment journey with an employer-sponsored retirement account, such as a 401(k) plan . These accounts offer a tax advantage way to save for retirement. And since money is deducted from your paycheck, you eliminate the risk of “forgetting to invest.” It happens automatically.

Many employers will match a portion of your retirement contributions , usually up to a certain percentage. For example, an employer might match 100% of your contributions up to 3 percent and then match 50% for the next 2 percent of contributions. Try to contribute at least enough to your 401(k) to earn the company match. It’s essentially free money for your future.

If you’re not sure which investments to pick, target-date funds are a popular option. With a target-date fund, you choose a fund based on the year you plan to retire. For example, if you plan to retire in 2060, you would pick a fund closest to that. Over time, these funds gradually rebalance as you near retirement, typically shifting your assets from stocks to bonds and cash.

Not all workplaces offer a 401(k) plan to employees. If you’re in that boat, consider opening either a traditional or Roth IRA at an online broker so you don’t fall behind in saving for retirement.

3. Create a financial plan

Before you start investing, figure out your goals, time frame and risk tolerance — either on your own or with the help of a financial advisor .

You can set yourself up for success by making your goals specific, measurable and achievable. For example “I want to retire rich” isn’t a specific goal, but “I want to retire with $800,000 by the time I’m 67” is.

Once you’ve defined your goal and time horizon, you can determine how much you need to save and invest each month to achieve your goal.

Your financial plan should also include whether you want to manage your investments yourself or if you want help from a professional.

Financial advising can be expensive — especially when you’re first starting out — but options like robo-advisors have driven costs down considerably. Some robo-advisors, like Wealthfront , offer portfolio management for as low as 0.25 percent of your account balance.

4. Start investing as soon as possible

Time is like an airplane runway for your investments. The longer the runway, the more time your investments have to pick up momentum and grow. That’s why “start investing as soon as you can” is such a popular piece of investment advice.

Consider this example: Sarah starts investing at age 25. She invests $250 a month and nets 8 percent annual returns. Meanwhile, John starts investing at age 35. He invests the same amount and enjoys the same annual returns as Sarah.

But when they both retire at age 65, Sarah’s investments will have amassed $777,169, assuming no taxes or inflation, while John would retire with $339,849, assuming no taxes or inflation.

Sarah was able to accumulate more than twice as much as John, simply by starting her investment journey a decade earlier. When it comes to investing, playing the long game can really pay off.

5. Consider broadly diversified index funds and ETFs

Picking the right investments is important, but thankfully, you don’t have to be a Wall Street whiz to create a low-cost, diversified portfolio.

Index funds essentially bundle dozens, sometimes hundreds, of individual stocks into a single fund that tracks a broader index, such as the S&P 500. Over time, the S&P 500 index has returned an average of about 10 percent annually.

When you buy an S&P 500 index fund , you can gain exposure to the biggest companies in America without researching and picking each individual stock. The diversified nature of index funds also helps mitigate the impact of poor performance from any single company, lowering the overall risk of significant losses.

If building your portfolio with a few cheap funds sounds too easy, or even boring, consider this: Some of the wealthiest Americans use index funds to build their fortunes, including legendary investor Warren Buffet .

Exchange traded funds (ETFs) work very similar to index funds. Some ETFs also track a broader stock market index, while others passively track a specific sector or industry, such as large cap companies or international stocks. However, many of these ETFs charge more than the low-cost funds mentioned earlier and may not deliver the same high performance.

When you invest in an index fund or ETF, make sure to check its expense ratio , or the percent of your investment you’ll pay as a fee to the fund company each year. You can find many index funds with an expense ratio under 0.20 percent, which would cost you $20 for every $10,000 invested.

But some of the most popular broadly-diversified funds are even cheaper than that. Vanguard’s S&P 500 ETF (VOO), for example, charges an expense ratio of just 0.03 percent, or $3 for every $10,000 invested annually.

6. Time in the market beats timing the market

This sage piece of investment advice emphasizes the importance of investing long-term instead of trying to predict short-term market movements.

Predicting the stock market is notoriously difficult, even for experts.The volatility and transaction costs associated with frequent trading can also eat into your returns.

A smarter investment strategy is dollar-cost averaging , or the practice of consistently investing a fixed amount of money over time.

Regularly injecting money into your investments helps you capitalize on market downturns, optimizing your average purchase price and boosting your overall share count. During market upswings, your regular contributions may secure fewer shares, but you’ll already have shares from prior purchases, so you’ll still gain and won’t completely miss out.This helps smooth out market fluctuations over time.

7. Automate as much as possible

It’s easy to get sidetracked by life. Sometimes you invest — but sometimes you forget. Automating your investments ensures you’re consistently working toward your financial goals, without even thinking about it.

One of the easiest automatic investment options is a workplace retirement plan, such as a 401(k). With a 401(k), you can contribute a portion of your salary directly to your retirement plan before your paycheck ever hits your bank account. Contributions reduce your taxable income, which can help you out at tax time, too.

Setting up automatic contributions to your IRA or taxable brokerage account is also fast and simple. Just link your bank account, choose how often you want to contribute money and select your investments.

So, set it, forget it, and let your money do the heavy lifting. Your future self will thank you.

Where to get investment advice

When it comes to investing, you don’t have to go it alone. If you still need help managing your investments, there are several options available.

Online brokers

Many online brokers, such as Charles Schwab , and Fidelity, offer extensive educational resources, which can be especially helpful for new investors. They also provide robust research and screener tools if you decide to take a more hands-on approach to your portfolio. The best part: You can mostly access these articles, videos, tools and webinars for free through your existing brokerage account.

Robo-advisors

Automated platforms such as Betterment or Wealthfront use algorithms to manage investment portfolios based on your preferences and risk tolerance. This option helps make investment decisions more accessible for those who prefer a hands-off approach.

Financial advisors

Financial advisors can help manage your investments but their real value lies in the other services they offer, such as holistic financial planning and estate planning. If you want professional guidance on your entire financial picture, working with an advisor can be a good option.

Bottom line

Investing can feel daunting, but following certain principals can help simplify the process. If you feel stuck or need more personalized guidance, consider working with a financial advisor. For simple portfolio management, using a robo-advisor presents a more affordable alternative. Taking time to research and learn as much as you can about investing will also boost your odds of long-term success.

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Finance influencer Invest with Queenie’s top money saving hacks for 2024

Want to get a jump start on your savings for 2024 but don’t know how? Here’s a guide on how to get started.

Saving money the biggest 2024 New Year’s resolution among Australians

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It has been a hard year for Australians battling inflated prices and soaring interest rates, with millions feeling the pinch in their weekly budget.

Sydney-based finance influencer Invest with Queenie shares her top tips for saving money and beating the cost-of-living crisis in 2024.

The licensed personal financial creator Queenie Tan guided her 224,000 TikTok followers on how to build savings and how to invest.

Ms Tan has offered up her top tips and saving hacks to get started.

Personal finance influencer Queenie Tan shares her top tips for saving in 2024. Picture: Instagram

Making new money habits

Before diving into the nitty gritty, Ms Tan said its important to consider the challenge of building a mindset that is geared towards saving.

Countless people start the new year with ambitious goals and decide to take an axe to the little luxuries they “splurge on”, but Ms Tan suggests taking a breath before cutting them out.

“A lot of people when they look to save money, they always think ‘I better cancel my Netflix subscription’ or ‘I can’t go out for coffee with my friend’,” she said.

While that might save them a small sum each week, there is much more to be saved in looking at the bigger expenses like housing, transport and food.

The new year is a great time to make new money habits, Queenie said. Picture: Instagram

Shopping around for the best deal on insurance or mortgage providers could save you hundreds if not thousands of dollars a year, without having to cut back on life’s pleasures, Ms Tan said.

A great way to start the year is to consider what you need to save for and how to chip away at the goal every week.

“The first thing is to break down big goals into smaller pieces,” Ms Tan said.

If the goal is to save $10,000 by the end of the year, consider breaking it down into smaller instalments to make it seem less overwhelming and more achievable.

If you put away $192 each week for the entire week, you will have $10,000 by the end of 2024. That’s just $27.40 a day.

How to finally start investing

The new year might also have you wanting to tick off an item that has long been on the to-do list, like finally getting started with investing in shares or ETFs.

Ms Tan’s best advice was simple: “just start small”.

“If you’ve never done it before, it can be really scary. Just stick your toes in, and put in maybe $5 or $10 and see how you feel and then build it up from there.”

She suggests that once you start getting comfortable with the process and are not knocked over by the ebb and flow of the market, consider setting up automatic investments.

“I’m just on autopilot now, every month $1,000 comes out of my account, it gets invested and I don’t even have to think about it,” she said.

Checking in with your budget

After the budget blowout of the holiday season, one of the first stops for the new year should be to check in and reassess the budget.

Particularly with soaring prices and interest rates, a budget that worked a year ago likely won’t cut it for 2024.

Ms Tan recommends checking in with your budget once a month to make adjustments and track how you spent over the last month.

“There was three months last year where I didn’t do my budget, and I really fell off the bandwagon,” she said.

“It was crazy. I was spending between $2000 to $4000 a month more, but I wasn’t having a fun time, I was just spending more.”

“Now that I’m doing it every month again, my spending is way back down and I don’t feel like my life has been affected.”

Queenie’s top hacks to beat cost-of-living

1. Shop around

Check out how much you could be saving on your electricity and gas by inputting your bills into the Energy Made Easy website created by the federal government.

“You can see whether it’s competitive and it recommends different providers that could cut down on your bills every month,” Ms Tan said.

NSW residents are lucky enough to get two handy apps to help them save cash on their car expenses.

The first is, Green Slip Price Check which Ms Tan said helped her save $200 a month on her green slip.

The second is Fuel Check which allows drivers to compare the price of every type of fuel at petrol stations across the state.

2. Cashback apps

You may have seen ads for Cashback applications on social media, and Ms Tan said they are definitely worth taking advantage of.

ShopBack , Cash Rewards and Honey are all apps that offer to pay you just for using their portal to online shop at a range of retailers.

“It might not earn you a huge amount of money but by next Christmas, you’ll have some money saved that you can buy presents with,” Ms Tan said.

3. Support your local takeaway

Next time you think about ordering take away through a delivery app like Uber Eats or DoorDash, consider ordering directly through the restaurant or better yet, turn it into a night out and eat inside the venue.

“It’s kind of sneaky but they mark up the prices of the menu items,” Ms Tan said.

“You’ll save like 20 to 30 per cent off plus the delivery fee and you get the experience of eating with the atmosphere of the restaurant.”

4. Put your money in a high-interest savings account

Again shopping around for a competitive high-interest rate savings account can help grow your money with very little effort.

“Any account with an interest rate higher than 5 per cent is great,” Ms Tan said.

Although she also said to keep an eye on the conditions of the account, with most high interest rates requiring customers to follow certain guidelines to make them eligible for the rate. However, most of them are easy enough to get a hang of, so don’t let this turn you away.

5. Sign up for rewards programs

Making the most of discount and voucher offers by signing up for a stores Rewards program can make a small difference to the cost of everyday items.

A hack for keeping your inbox clear of the inevitable surge of promotional materials that come with it, is to create a separate email account for the sole purpose of giving out to stores. It also keeps them all in the same place to make it easier when searching for a coupon.

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A young Aussie couple have revealed how they earn a combined income of $180k and why it doesn’t always go “far.”

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COMMENTS

  1. Bogleheads Investing Advice and Info

    The Bogleheads® emphasize starting early, living below one's means, regular saving, broad diversification, simplicity, and sticking to one's investment plan regardless of market conditions. This site is composed of two primary resources: our Wiki and our Forum. Getting Started and the Bogleheads' investment philosophy.

  2. Personal Investment Advice

    Joined: Tue Dec 12, 2023 5:04 am Personal Investment Advice by ajamest » Tue Dec 12, 2023 6:08 am I am looking to ask a few questions to make sure I am not making any obvious mistakes in my personal investment program. I'll be a bit verbose, mostly with the hope that if I say something stupid, someone will point it out.

  3. Prioritizing investments

    Figure 1. Prioritizing investments Establish an emergency fund to your satisfaction. If you have many other high financial priorities (like paying off high-interest debt), start with a smaller emergency fund, and grow it later over time, as those other priorities are satisfied.

  4. Getting started

    Bogleheads emphasize regular saving, broad diversification, and sticking to an investment plan regardless of market conditions. We follow a small number of simple investment principles that proved over time to produce risk-adjusted returns far greater than those achieved by the average investor.

  5. Bogleheads® investment philosophy

    The Bogleheads follow a few simple investment principles that have historically produced risk-adjusted returns that are better than the returns of average investors. These principles are the results of Nobel prize-winning research on Modern Portfolio Theory and the Capital Asset Pricing Model.

  6. A Boglehead explains the simplest way to manage your money

    -2.05% Taylor Larimore is a big advocate of keeping investing simple — simple enough to be handled with just three mutual funds. He says it means he doesn't need to spend more than about an hour...

  7. Resources

    The Bogleheads forum is a great place to give and get free, unbiased advice. Members discuss various topics such as personal investing, investing theory, personal finance, personal consumer issues, non-U.S. investing, and local chapters news and events. Registration is free.

  8. Bogleheads On Investing Podcast bogleheads

    58 min NOV 24, 2023 Episode 64: Victor Haghani and James White, "The Missing Billionaires", host Rick Ferri Victor Haghani and James White are co-authors of "The Missing Billionaires, A Guide to Better Financial Decisions."

  9. The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing (a review)

    The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing covers a wide range of topics, including insurance, behavioral economics, modern portfolio theory, and tips on saving money. Analytical tools (e.g., bond duration) are explained conceptually and without the use of formulas.

  10. Bogleheads, Baby Steps, and Other Personal Financial ...

    Bogleheads. Named after Vanguard Group founder John Bogle, this strategy advocates for saving at least 20% of your income, investing early and often, never trying to "time the market," finding ...

  11. personal investing

    Jimbo Dean Posts: 3 Joined: Sat Feb 01, 2020 12:54 am personal investing by Jimbo Dean » Sat Feb 01, 2020 1:18 am Why can't I pull the trigger? 65 years old, old enough to know better! New to Bogleheads, love the concept, read the books and would advise younger people to go with VTSAX.

  12. Bogleheads On Investing Podcast

    65 Episodes Podcast weblog featuring the investment wisdom and principles of John C. Bogle Episode 65: Dr. Qian Wang, Vanguard economic and market outlook of 2024, host Rick Ferri Thursday Dec 21, 2023

  13. Investing Lessons From Vanguard's Bogleheads

    investing mutual funds Investing Lessons From Vanguard's Bogleheads Their zealous devotion to the principles espoused by John Bogle means a nearly exclusive reliance on index funds and close...

  14. Bogleheads University

    Bogleheads University is a collection of presentations illustrating Bogleheads Principles of Investing which provide a framework for understanding the basics, in addition to coverage of more advanced topics such as Social Security, retirement tax planning and real estate and factor investing. 2023 - Bogleheads 101: Basics

  15. The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing

    Praise for The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing "If you master the concepts laid out in this book, you'll do very well." Reuters News "Kindness, integrity, and common sense can be scarce on Wall Street, but the Bogleheads have each in abundance. Reading The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing is like learning investing from your grandfather.

  16. The Bogleheads Guide to Investing

    Bogleheads encourage mixing things up with bonds, stocks and other asset classes. Invest for the Long Term: Many investors try to time the market, taking advantage of when it is at the top or bottom. However, this can be exceptionally risky, so Bogleheads recommend investing for the long term.

  17. What Is A Boglehead And What Investing Lessons Can You Learn?

    Bogleheads follow several simple investing philosophies: 1. Live Below Your Means. This is a simple strategy - spend less than you earn. Live below what you need. Save the rest. Frugality is important, but so is earning more. 2. Invest Early And Often.

  18. Can this be done? Custodial account for elderly

    Non-investing personal finance issues including insurance, credit, real estate, taxes, employment and legal issues such as trusts and wills. 1 post • Page 1 of 1. ... Can this be done? Custodial account for elderly. Post by bendix » Sat Jan 06, 2024 10:48 pm. Bogleheads! I am wondering if this can be done and appreciate everyone´s ideas. My ...

  19. Should I remove college age son as dependent so that ...

    Non-investing personal finance issues including insurance, credit, real estate, taxes, employment and legal issues such as trusts and wills. 1 post • Page 1 of 1. ... ↳ Spain - Bogleheads® España; ↳ Spain; ↳ United Arab Emirates; Wiki; ↳ The Bogleheads® Wiki: a collaborative work of the Bogleheads community;

  20. What is a Boglehead and What Can You Learn From One?

    What is Boglehead Investing? Index funds are Bogleheads favorite investment option. These passive investing funds have low fund fees and are easy-to-own. Also, they are an easy-to-understand investment. Jack Bogle receives the credit for launching the first index fund in 1976.

  21. What is the Bogleheads Guide to Investing

    The Bogleheads recommend spreading your investments across different asset classes to reduce risk. This means investing in a variety of stocks, bonds, and other securities. The Bogleheads believe that diversification can help to reduce risk and increase returns over the long term.

  22. Bogleheads Stay the Course

    Bogle, who died in January 2019, founded Malvern, Pa.-based Vanguard in 1974. Two years later, he launched the first publicly available index fund, which followed the S&P 500 index. Wall Street ...

  23. The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing, 2nd Edition

    The irreverent guide to investing, Boglehead style The Bogleheads Guide to Investing is a DIY handbook that espouses the sage investment wisdom of John C. Bogle. This witty and wonderful book offers contrarian advice that provides the first step on the road to investment success, illustrating how relying on typical common sense promoted by Wall Street is destined to leave you poorer.

  24. 10 2024 Stock Picks From An Investing Expert

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  27. How to save money: TikTok influencer Invest with Queenie shares her top

    Sydney-based finance influencer Invest with Queenie shares her top tips for saving money and beating the cost-of-living crisis in 2024. The licensed personal financial creator Queenie Tan guided ...